IF YOU ARE FULLY VACCINATED
CDC has updated its guidance for people who are fully vaccinated. See Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People.
IMPORTANT UPDATE FOR SCHOOLS
CDC recommends schools continue to use the current COVID-19 prevention strategies for the 2020-2021 school year. Learn more
Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
UPDATE
Getting vaccinated prevents severe illness, hospitalizations, and death. Unvaccinated people should get vaccinated and continue masking until they are fully vaccinated. With the Delta variant, this is more urgent than ever. CDC has updated guidance for fully vaccinated people based on new evidence on the Delta variant.
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.

Different COVID-19 Vaccines

Different COVID-19 Vaccines
CDC Monitoring Reports of Myocarditis and Pericarditis

CDC has received increased reports of myocarditis and pericarditis in adolescents and young adults after COVID-19 vaccination. The known and potential benefits of COVID-19 vaccination outweigh the known and potential risks, including the possible risk of myocarditis or pericarditis. We continue to recommend COVID-19 vaccination for anyone 12 years of age and older.

Learn When to Seek Medical Care

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Authorized and Recommended Vaccines

Currently, three vaccines are authorized and recommended in the United States to prevent COVID-19:

Pfizer-BioNTech
Moderna
Johnson & Johnson / Janssen

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Different COVID-19 Vaccines

The best COVID-19 vaccine is the first one that is available to you. Do not wait for a specific brand. All currently authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines:

CDC does not recommend one vaccine over another.

Vaccine Brand Name

Who Can Get this Vaccine [ 1 ]

How Many Shots You Will Need

When Are You Fully Vaccinated?

Vaccine Brand Name

Pfizer-BioNTech

Who Can Get this Vaccine [ 1 ]

People 12 years and older

How Many Shots You Will Need

2 shots
Given 3 weeks (21 days) apart [ 2 ]

When Are You Fully Vaccinated?

2 weeks after your second shot

Vaccine Brand Name

Moderna

Who Can Get this Vaccine [ 1 ]

People 18 years and older

How Many Shots You Will Need

2 shots
Given 4 weeks (28 days) apart [ 2 ]

When Are You Fully Vaccinated?

2 weeks after your second shot

Vaccine Brand Name

Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen

Who Can Get this Vaccine [ 1 ]

People 18 years and older

How Many Shots You Will Need

1 shot

When Are You Fully Vaccinated?

2 weeks after your shot

Vaccine Brand Name
Pfizer-BioNTech

Who Can Get this Vaccine [ 1 ]
People 12 years and older

How Many Shots You Will Need
2 shots given 3 weeks (21 days) apart [ 2 ]

When Are You Fully Vaccinated?
2 weeks after your second shot

Vaccine Brand Name
Moderna

Who Can Get this Vaccine [ 1 ]
People 18 years and older

How Many Shots You Will Need
2 shots given 4 weeks (28 days) apart [ 2 ]

When Are You Fully Vaccinated?
2 weeks after your second shot

Vaccine Brand Name
Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen

Who Can Get this Vaccine [ 1 ]
People 18 years and older

How Many Shots You Will Need
1 shot

When Are You Fully Vaccinated?
2 weeks after your shot

1 If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction to any ingredient in the vaccine you are scheduled to receive, you should not get that vaccine. If you have been instructed not to get one type of COVID-19 vaccine, you may still be able to get another type. Learn more information for people with allergies.

2 You should get your second shot as close to the recommended 3-week or 4-week interval as possible. However, your second shot may be given up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose, if necessary.

Vaccine Types

  • Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work
    Learn how the body fights infection and how COVID-19 vaccines protect people by producing immunity. Also see the different types of COVID-19 vaccines that currently are available or are undergoing large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials in the United States.​
  • COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines
    Information about mRNA vaccines generally and COVID-19 vaccines that use this new technology specifically.
  • Viral Vector COVID-19 Vaccines
    Information about viral vector vaccines generally and COVID-19 vaccines that use this new technology specifically.

Vaccines in Phase 3 Clinical Trials

As of February 27, 2021, large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for two COVID-19 vaccines in the United States:

  • AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine
  • Novavax COVID-19 vaccine​

Learn more about U.S. COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials, including vaccines in earlier stages of development, by visiting clinicaltrials.govexternal icon.

This page will be updated as additional information is available.

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For Healthcare Professionals

COVID-19 Clinical Resources