After You Travel

After You Travel

You may have been exposed to COVID-19 on your travels. You may feel well and not have any symptoms, but you can be contagious without symptoms and spread the virus to others. You and your travel companions (including children) pose a risk to your family, friends, and community for 14 days after you travel.

Get Tested and Stay Home After Travel

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days after travel.
    • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
    • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.
  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.

Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements after travel.

Also, take these actions after you return from travel to protect others from getting COVID-19:

  • Avoid crowds and stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who did not travel with you. It’s important to do this everywhere — both indoors and outdoors.
  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth when in public settings. Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.
  • If there are people in the household who did not travel with you, wear a mask and ask everyone in the household to wear masks in shared spaces inside your home for 14 days after travel.
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness.
  • Watch your health: Look for symptoms of COVID-19.

Getting tested after travel is especially important if you did any of these activities that put you at higher risk for COVID-19:

  • Going to a large social gathering like a wedding, funeral, or party.
  • Attending a mass gathering like a sporting event, concert, or parade.
  • Being in crowds like in restaurants, bars, fitness centers, or movie theaters.
  • Taking public transportation like planes, trains or buses or being in transportation hubs like airports.
  • Traveling on a cruise ship or riverboat.
What to Do if You Get Sick After Travel or Test Positive

If you get sick with fever, cough, or other symptoms of COVID-19, or test positive:

  • Isolate if you are sick. Stay home and take other precautions. Avoid contact with others until it’s safe for you to end home isolation.
  • Don’t travel when you are sick.
  • You might have COVID-19. If you do, know that most people are able to recover at home without medical care.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room and let them know you might have COVID-19.
  • If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), get emergency medical care immediately.
  • If you live in close quarters with others, take additional precautions to protect them.

If you have a medical appointment that cannot be postponed, call your doctor’s office and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help people in the office protect themselves and other patients. See CDC’s page on What to Do If You Are Sick for more details.