Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
To maximize protection from the Delta variant and prevent possibly spreading it to others, get vaccinated as soon as you can and wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.

After International Travel

After International Travel

You may have been exposed to COVID-19 on your travels. You may feel well and not have any symptoms, but you can still be infected and spread the virus to others. You and your travel companions (including children) pose a risk to your family, friends, and community for 14 days after you travel.

After travel information for people fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine or a vaccine authorized for emergency use by the World Health Organization:

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel.
    • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.
  • Self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms; isolate and get tested if you develop symptoms.
  • Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements after travel.

After travel information for people who are not fully vaccinated:

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days after travel.
    • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.
    • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.
  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.
  • Self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms; isolate and get tested if you develop symptoms.
  • Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements.

Information for people who recently recovered from COVID-19

If you recovered from a documented COVID-19 infection within the last 3 months, follow all requirements and recommendations for fully vaccinated travelers except you do NOT need to get a test 3-5 days after travel unless you are symptomatic. People can continue to test positive for up to 3 months after diagnosis and not be infectious to others.

Have You Been Fully Vaccinated?

People are considered fully vaccinated*:

  • 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or
  • 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine

If you don’t meet these requirements, you are NOT fully vaccinated.

What to Do if You Get Sick After Travel or Test Positive

Regardless of your vaccination status, if you get sick with fever, cough, or other symptoms of COVID-19, or test positive:

  • Isolate if you are sick. Stay home and take other precautions. Avoid contact with others until it’s safe for you to end home isolation.
  • Don’t travel when you are sick.
  • You might have COVID-19. If you do, know that most people are able to recover at home without medical care.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room and let them know you might have COVID-19.
  • If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), get emergency medical care immediately.
  • If you live in close quarters with others, take additional precautions to protect them.

If you have a medical appointment that cannot be postponed, call your doctor’s office and tell them you have or may have COVID-19. This will help people in the office protect themselves and other patients. See CDC’s page on What to Do If You Are Sick for more details.

* This guidance applies to COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for emergency use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson (J&J)/Janssen COVID-19 vaccines.  This guidance can also be applied to COVID-19 vaccines that have been listed for emergency use by the World Health Organization (e.g. AstraZeneca/Oxford). See WHO’s website external iconfor more information about WHO-authorized COVID-19 vaccines.