Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
To maximize protection from the Delta variant and prevent possibly spreading it to others, get vaccinated as soon as you can and wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.
Covid Tracker Weekly Review

Keep Variants at Bay. Get Vaccinated Today.

Keep Variants at Bay. Get Vaccinated Today.
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Interpretive Summary for June 25, 2021  

Keep Variants at Bay. Get Vaccinated Today.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is constantly changing through mutation, leading to new variants, including ones classified as variants of concern (VOCs). VOCs have the potential to spread more easily and quickly than other variants, which could lead to more cases of COVID-19. A recent CDC study found that the circulation of SARS-CoV-2 variants in the United States changed rapidly from December 2020 to May 2021, demonstrating how quickly a new variant can emerge, spread, and become the dominant strain.

Currently, several variants are found around the world, including in the United States. On June 15, 2021, the B.1.617.2 (Delta)* variant was classified as a VOC because it spreads from person to person more easily than other variants and may cause more severe disease. B.1.617.2 has been reported in 77 countries and in the United Kingdom has become the main variant in COVID-19 cases. In the United States, the proportion** of B.1.617.2 for the 2-week period ending June 19, 2021, is predicted to increase to 20.6% nationally and be higher in regions 2, 6, 7, 8, and 9.

The more a virus circulates in a population, the more opportunities it has to transform itself and can reduce the effectiveness of our vaccines. Recent studies have shown that the vaccines available in the United States are effective against variants currently circulating, including B.1.617.2. Vaccines interrupt the ability of the virus that causes COVID-19 to move between people and mutate, so it is important for everyone to get vaccinated as soon as they’re eligible. If you have questions or concerns about vaccines, please contact your healthcare professional, state or local health department, or local pharmacist or visit the CDC website. To find a place in your community to get a vaccine, visit Vaccines.gov or your local public health department website.

* To assist with public discussions of variants, the World Health Organizationexternal icon (WHO) recently proposed using labels consisting of the Greek Alphabet (e.g., Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta) as a practical way to discuss variants by non-scientific audiences. CDC supports WHO’s effort to a develop simple, non-stigmatizing variant naming system and is now indicating the WHO label for each key variant of interest (VOI) and variant of concern.

** The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

Note to readers: On June 17, 2021, President Biden signed into law the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act, establishing June 19, also called Juneteenth, as the 12th Federal holiday. This day serves to honor the end of slavery in the United States and is also a day to emphasize education and progress in our march toward justice. Still, so much more needs to be done. The mission at CDC is to protect the nation from health, safety, and security threats. Racism is a serious public health threat that directly affects the well-being of millions of Americans. CDC is committed to addressing the impact of racism in all we do. Please visit CDC’s Racism and Health website for updates on our progress and discussion of the work we are doing with partners across public health.

Reported Cases

The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (11,343) decreased 4.4% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (11,867). Compared with the highest peak on January 10, 2021 (252,166), the current 7-day average decreased 95.5%. A total of 33,409,895 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of June 23.

33,409,895
Total Cases Reported

11,343
Current 7-Day Average*

11,867
Prior 7-Day Average

-4.4%
Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week 

*Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 80,593 historical cases reported retroactively, 1,364 were reported in the current week and 1,165 were reported in the prior week.

Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

red line

7-Day moving average

chart showing Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

SARS-CoV-2 Variants

Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, six variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending June 19 are summarized here. Nationally, B.1.1.7 (Alpha) proportion is predicted to decrease to 52.2%; B.1.617.2 (Delta) proportion is predicted to increase to 20.6%; and P.1 (Gamma) proportion is predicted to increase to 16.4%. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.1.7 (Alpha) proportions will be more than 50% in HHS regions 3, 4, 5, and 6. B.1.617.2 (Delta) is predicted to increase in all regions and to be more than 45% in regions 7 and 8. P.1 (Gamma) is predicted to be more than 20% in regions 1, 4, 5, and 10; and B.1.526 (Iota) is predicted to be more than 10% in regions 1, 2, and 3.

*The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

chart showing SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States Map with pie charts overlay Regional Variant Proportions More Variants Data

Testing

The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has increased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 1.7%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for June 11-June 17 was 641,921, down 10.2% from 714,638 for the prior 7 days.

463,752,907
Total Tests Reported

463,752,907
Total Tests Reported

641,921
7-Day Average Tests Reported

1.7%
7-Day Average % Positivity

463,752,907
Total Tests Reported

1.7% 
Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

+4.3%
Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

Map showing COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

Vaccinations

The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of June 24, 320.7 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 178.3 million people, or 53.7% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 151.3 million people, or 45.6% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of June 24, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported (by date administered) to CDC per day was 0.37 million, a 55.3% decrease from the previous week.

The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of June 24, 87.5% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 77.4% are fully vaccinated. Over half (65.7%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 56.2% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 12 or older, 62.8% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 53.3% are fully vaccinated.

320,687,205
Vaccines Administered

178,331,677
People who received at least one dose

151,252,034
People who are fully vaccinated*

53.7%
Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

45.6%
Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

+1.8
Percentage point increase from last week

+3.0
Percentage point increase from last week

*People who are fully vaccinated represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC

red line

7-Day moving average

chart showing Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC

Hospitalizations

New Hospital Admissions

The current 7-day average for June 16–June 22 was 1,843. This is a 7.9% decrease from the prior 7-day average (2,001) from June 9–June 15. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has been generally decreasing since April 19.

2,270,417
Total New Admissions

1,843
Current 7-Day Average

2,001
Prior 7-Day Average

-7.9%
Change in 7-Day Average

The start of consistent reporting of hospitalization data was August 1, 2020.

Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

Chart showing New Admissions of Patients with Confirmed COVID-19, United States August 01 2020-Junw 21, 2021

New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 85 Years and Older

CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that across the entire COVID-19 pandemic, rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations have consistently been the highest in adults 85 years of age and older. Rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations for this group peaked at 140.4 per 100,000 people in early January 2021. Since then, rates in this group have fallen dramatically. For the week ending May 22, 2021, the rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalization was 14.1 per 100,000 people. For this age group, this is the lowest rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations since March 2020.

Rate of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 85 Years and Older

Rate of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 85 Years and Older

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

More COVID-NET Data

Deaths

The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (287) has increased 5.2% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (273). As of June 23, a total of 600,442 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

600,442
Total Deaths Reported

287
Current 7-Day Average*

273
Prior 7-Day Average

+5.2%
Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

*Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 6,377 historical deaths reported retroactively, 50 were reported in the current week and 100 were reported in the prior week.

Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

red line

7-Day moving average

Chart showing Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC
More Death Data

Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates

  • New Vaccination and Case Trends tab displays trends in people receiving at least 1 dose of vaccine and being fully vaccinated along with trends in cases, by age group
  • Users can now filter all maps on County View tab to display only metropolitan counties or only non-metropolitan counties
  • The County View tab now includes expanded vaccination coverage maps with the addition of percent of each population of interest who has received at least one dose of vaccine
  • The stats bar at the top of the site now includes level of community transmission and enhanced visualizations
  • Users can now stratify Trends in Emergency Department Visits by age group