Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.
UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

Considerations for Non-emergency Vehicle Transportation for Tribal Communities During COVID-19

Considerations for Non-emergency Vehicle Transportation for Tribal Communities During COVID-19

Tribal community members may need to regularly share personal vehicles with members outside of their own households. They may also need to use personal vehicles to transport people who are visibly sick. In addition, tribal organizations may provide medical transportation to their community members using non-emergency vehicles (cars or vans, for example). The following precautions can be considered to minimize risk of spreading COVID-19 when sharing personal vehicles.

If the driver and passengers are not sick (everyday practices for safe transportation)

Wear a mask

  • Wear a mask. This is especially important when it’s hard to stay at least 6 feet away from people.

Note: Masks should not be placed on:

  • Babies and children younger than 2 years old
  • Anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious
  • Anyone who is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without help
  • Masks are meant to protect other people in case the wearer is unknowingly infected but does not have symptoms.

Practice social distancing (also called physical distancing) to the extent possible

  • The passengers should sit as far away as possible from the driver and each other.
  • Travel with windows open or use the vehicle’s vents for fresh air circulation.

Limit close contact

  • The passenger should sit as far away as possible from the driver.
  • The bigger the vehicle, the better, to allow distancing. Vans are better than cars since they allow for better distancing between the passenger and driver.
  • Travel with windows open or use the vehicle’s vents for fresh air circulation.
  • Avoid picking up other passengers.

When to Clean

Cleaning high touch surfaces and shared objects regularly (for example, once a day) is usually enough to remove virus that may be on surfaces unless someone with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 has been in your facility.

Cleaning with products containing soap or detergent reduces germs on surfaces and objects by removing contaminants and may also weaken or damage some of the virus particles, which decreases risk of infection from surfaces.

If there has been a sick person or someone who has COVID-19 in your facility within the last 24 hours, you should clean and disinfect the spaces they occupied.

For more information on cleaning your facility regularly and cleaning your facility when someone is sick, see Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility.

Digital Resources
Image of two passenger in a car wearing a mask
Image of two passenger in a car wearing a mask and social distancing
An image of a driver and a passenger in a car. Both are wearing masks and are separated as far as possible in the car.
Image of passengers in a car practicing social distancing
Image of two women cleaning surfaces in a vehicle
Image of two women cleaning surfaces in a vehicle