Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.
UPDATE
The White House announced that vaccines will be required for international travelers coming into the United States, with an effective date of November 8, 2021. For purposes of entry into the United States, vaccines accepted will include FDA approved or authorized and WHO Emergency Use Listing vaccines. More information is available here.
UPDATE
Travel requirements to enter the United States are changing, starting November 8, 2021. More information is available here.

Infographic: Basic do’s and don’ts for employees to prevent workplace violence

Infographic: Basic do’s and don’ts for employees to prevent workplace violence
Updated Sept. 16, 2020, 12:00 AM

Text version

infographic: Basic do’s and don’ts for employees to prevent workplace violence

Basic do’s and don’ts for employees to prevent workplace violence

Do

Do attend all employer-provided training on how to recognize, avoid, and respond to potentially violent situations.

Do report perceived threats or acts of violence to your manager or supervisor, following any existing policies that may be in place.

Do remain aware of and support coworkers and customers if a threatening or violent situation occurs.

Don’t

Don’t argue with a customer if they make threats or become violent. If needed, go to a safe area (ideally, a room that locks from the inside, has a second exit route, and has a phone or silent alarm).

Don’t attempt to force anyone who appears upset or violent to follow COVID-19 prevention policies or other policies or practices related to COVID-19 (e.g., limits on number of household or food products).