Infographic: COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalization, and Death by Race/Ethnicity

Infographic: COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalization, and Death by Race/Ethnicity
Updated Dec. 10, 2020
Text Version
Infographic presenting table of COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations, and Deaths, by Race/Ethnicity.

As of November 27, 2020, compared to non-Hispanic White persons, age-adjusted case rates reported by state and territorial jurisdictions were 1.8 times higher among American Indian or Alaska Native, Non-Hispanic persons; 0.6 times higher among Asian, Non-Hispanic persons; 1.4 times higher among Black or African American, Non-Hispanic persons; and 1.7 times higher among Hispanic or Latino persons.

As of November 25, 2020, compared to non-Hispanic White persons, age-adjusted hospitalization rates were 4.0 times higher among American Indian or Alaska Native, Non-Hispanic persons; 1.2 times higher among Asian, Non-Hispanic persons; 3.7 times higher among Black or African American, Non-Hispanic persons; and 4.1 times higher among Hispanic or Latino persons.

As of November 27, 2020, compared to non-Hispanic White persons, age-adjusted death rates were 2.6 times higher among American Indian or Alaska Native, Non-Hispanic persons; 1.1 times higher among Asian, Non-Hispanic persons; 2.8 times higher among Black or African American, Non-Hispanic persons; and 2.8 times higher among Hispanic or Latino persons.

Age-adjusted death rates (deaths per 100,000) after 1998 are calculated based on the 2000 U.S. standard population. Populations used for computing death rates for 2011–2018 are postcensal estimates based on the 2010 census, estimated as of July 1, 2010. Rates for census years are based on populations enumerated in the corresponding censuses. Rates for non-census years between 2000 and 2010 are revised using updated intercensal population estimates and may differ from rates previously published. Data on age-adjusted death rates prior to 1999 are taken from historical data.

Race and ethnicity are risk markers for other underlying conditions that affect health, including socioeconomic status, access to health care, and exposure to the virus related to occupation, e.g., among frontline, essential, and critical infrastructure workers.

How to slow the spread of COVID-19: wear a mask, stay 6 feet apart, wash your hands.

  1. Cases data source: reported by state and territorial jurisdictions (accessed 11/27/2020). Numbers are ratios of age-adjusted rates standardized to the 2000 US standard population. Calculations use only the 52% of reports with race/ethnicity; this can result in inaccurate estimates of the relative risk among groups.
  2. Hospitalization data source: COVID-NET (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covid-net/purpose-methods.html, accessed 11/25/2020). Numbers are ratios of age-adjusted rates standardized to the 2000 US standard COVID-NET catchment population.
  3. Death data source: NCHS provisional death counts (https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Deaths-involving-coronavirus-disease-2019-COVID-19/ ks3g-spdg, accessed 11/27/2020). Numbers are ratios of age-adjusted rates standardized to the 2000 US standard population.