Important update: Healthcare facilities
CDC has updated select ways to operate healthcare systems effectively in response to COVID-19 vaccination. Learn more
To maximize protection from the Delta variant and prevent possibly spreading it to others, get vaccinated as soon as you can and wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.
UPDATE
Given new evidence on the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC has updated the guidance for fully vaccinated people. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.

Estimated COVID-19 Burden

Estimated COVID-19 Burden

To better reflect the full burden of COVID-19, CDC provides estimates of COVID-19 infections, symptomatic illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths using statistical models to adjust for cases that national surveillance networks do not capture for a number of reasons. These estimates and the methodologies used to calculate them are published in Clinical Infectious Diseasesexternal icon and The Lancet Regional Health – Americasexternal icon. These estimates will be updated periodically.

Estimated COVID-19 Infections, Symptomatic Illnesses, Hospitalizations, and Deaths in the United States

CDC estimates that from February 2020–May 2021:

1 in 4.2 (95% UI* 3.6 – 4.9) COVID–19 infections were reported.
1 in 3.8 (95% UI* 3.4 – 4.3) COVID–19 symptomatic illnesses were reported.
1 in 1.8 (95% UI* 1.6 – 2.0) COVID–19 hospitalizations were reported.
1 in 1.3 (95% UI* 1.30 – 1.34) COVID-19 deaths were reported.

These estimates suggest that during this period, there were approximately:

120.2 Million

Estimated Total Infections

101.8 Million

Estimated Symptomatic Illnesses

6.2 Million

Estimated Hospitalizations

767,000

Estimated Total Deaths

Last Updated: May 29, 2021

Table 1: Preliminary estimated COVID-19 cumulative incidence, by age group — United States, February 2020-May 2021
Infections Symptomatic Illness Hospitalizations Deaths
Age group Estimate 95% UI* Estimate 95% UI* Estimate 95% UI* Estimate 95% UI*
0-17 years 26,838,244 21,966,492 – 33,109,862 22,895,857 19,681,278 – 27,181,718 209,264 169,035 – 256,472 332 310-449
18-49 years 60,461,355 50,372,115 – 73,172,038 51,581,445 45,181,664 – 59,344,624 1,533,679 1,313,618 – 1,796,098 34,171 31,355 – 37,360
50-64 years 20,375,641 17,043,764 – 24,561,779 17,377,602 15,329,878 – 19,854,568 1,604,612 1,411,704 – 1,831,326 116,284 112,590 – 120,005
65+ years 12,298,890 9,934,247 – 15,460,317 10,005,696 8,872,135 – 11,338,584 2,808,089 2,474,510 – 3,218,931 615,824 607,666 – 623,771
All ages 120,259,370 103,321,791 – 140,873,869 101,886,269 90,959,297 – 115,248,191 6,156,065 5,502,505 – 6,954,083 766,611 754,944 – 778,170

* Adjusted estimates are presented in two parts: an uncertainty interval [UI] and a point estimate. The uncertainty interval provides a range in which the true number or rate of COVID-19 infections, symptomatic illnesses, hospitalizations, or deaths would be expected to fall if the same study was repeated many times, and it gives an idea of the precision of the point estimate. A 95% uncertainty interval means that if the study were repeated 100 times, then 95 out of 100 times the uncertainty interval would contain the true point estimate. Conversely, in only 5 times out of a 100 would the uncertainty interval not contain the true point estimate.

These are preliminary estimates that may fluctuate up or down as more data become available and as we improve our understanding of the detection and reporting of COVID-19. CDC will continue to update these estimates periodically.

Table 2: Estimated rates of COVID-19 disease outcomes per 100,000, by age group — United States, February 2020-May 2021
Infection rate per 100,000 Symptomatic Illness rate per 100,000 Hospitalization rate per 100,000 Death rate per 100,000
Age group Estimate 95% UI* Estimate 95% UI* Estimate 95% UI* Estimate 95% UI*
0-17 years 36,746 30,075 – 45,332 31,348 26,947 – 37,216 287 231 – 351 0.5 0.4-0.6
18-49 years 44,116 36,754 – 53,391 37,637 32,967 – 43,301 1,119 958 – 1,311 25 23-27
50-64 years 32,391 27,094 – 39,045 27,625 24,369 – 31,562 2,551 2,244 – 2,911 85 179-191
65+ years 22,751 18,377 – 28,599 18,509 16,412 – 20,975 5,195 4,577 – 5,955 1139 1124-1154
All ages 36,771 31,592 – 43,074 31,153 27,812 – 35,238 1,882 1,682 – 2,126 234 230-327

* Adjusted rates are presented in two parts: an uncertainty interval [UI] and a point estimate. The uncertainty interval provides a range in which the true number or rate of COVID-19 infections, symptomatic illnesses, hospitalizations, or deaths would be expected to fall if the same study was repeated many times, and it gives an idea of the precision of the point estimate. A 95% uncertainty interval means that if the study were repeated 100 times, then 95 out of 100 times the uncertainty interval would contain the true point estimate. Conversely, in only 5 times out of a 100 would the uncertainty interval not contain the true point estimate.

Percentage of COVID-19 infections, symptomatic illness, and hospitalizations, and deaths, by age group—United States, February 2020-May 2021