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Surveillance for Certain Health Behaviors Among States and Selected Local Areas — United States, 2010

Fang Xu, PhD1,2

Machell Town, PhD1

Lina S. Balluz, ScD1

William P. Bartoli, MS1,2

Wilmon Murphy1,2

Pranesh P. Chowdhury, MD1

William S. Garvin1

Carol Pierannunzi, PhD1

Yuna Zhong, MD1,2

Simone W. Salandy, PhD1,2

Candace K. Jones, MA1,2

Carol A. Crawford, PhD1

1Division of Behavioral Surveillance, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, CDC

2Northrop Grumman Corporation, Atlanta, GA

Corresponding author: Carol A. Crawford, PhD, Division of Behavioral Surveillance, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, CDC. Telephone: 404-498-6023; E-mail: cdg7@cdc.gov.

Abstract

Problem: Chronic diseases (e.g., heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Engaging in healthy behaviors (e.g., quitting smoking and tobacco use, being more physically active, and eating a nutritious diet) and accessing preventive health-care services (e.g., routine physical checkups, screening for cancer, checking blood pressure, testing blood cholesterol, and receiving recommended vaccinations) can reduce morbidity and mortality from chronic and infectious disease and lower medical costs. Monitoring and evaluating health-risk behaviors and the use of health services is essential to developing intervention programs, promotion strategies, and health policies that address public health at multiple levels, including state, territory, metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA), and county.

Reporting Period: January–December 2010.

Description of the System: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based, random-digit–dialed telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years residing in the United States. BRFSS collects data on health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, access to health care, and use of preventive health services and practices related to the leading causes of death and disabilities in the United States. This report presents results for 2010 for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, 192 MMSAs, and 302 counties.

Results: In 2010, the estimated prevalence of high-risk health behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, access to health care, and use of preventive health services varied substantially by state and territory, MMSA, and county. In the following summary of results, each set of proportions refers to the range of estimated prevalence for the disease, condition, or behaviors, as reported by survey respondents. Adults reporting good or better health: 67.9%–89.3% for states and territories, 72.2%–92.1% for MMSAs, and 72.8%–95.8% for counties. Adults with health-care coverage: 69.4%–95.7% for states and territories, 45.7%–97.0% for MMSAs, and 45.7%–97.2% for counties. Adults who had a dental visit in the past year: 57.2%–81.7% for states and territories, 47.1%–83.5% for MMSAs, and 47.1%–88.2% for counties. Adults aged ≥65 years having had all their natural teeth extracted (edentulism): 7.4%–36.0% for states and territories, 4.8%–34.8% for MMSAs, and 2.4%–39.3% for counties. A routine physical checkup during the preceding 12 months: 53.8%–80.0% for states and territories, 49.5%–82.6% for MMSAs, and 49.5%–85.3% for counties. Influenza vaccination received during the preceding 12 months among adults aged ≥65 years: 26.9%–73.4% for states and territories, 51.7%–77.1% for MMSAs, and 49.3%–87.8% for counties. Pneumococcal vaccination ever received among adults aged ≥65 years: 24.7%–74.0% for states and territories, 48.6%–79.9% for MMSAs, and 47.6%–83.1% for counties. Sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy ever received among adults aged ≥50 years: 37.8%–75.7% for states and territories, 37.3%–79.9% for MMSAs, and 37.3%–82.5% for counties. Blood stool test received during the preceding 2 years among adults aged ≥50 years: 8.5%–27.0% for states and territories, 6.7%–51.3% for MMSAs, and 6.8%–57.2% for counties. Women who reported having had a Papanicolaou test during the preceding 3 years: 67.8%–88.9% for states and territories, 63.3%–91.2% for MMSAs, and 63.2%–95.7% for counties. Women aged ≥40 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years: 63.8%–83.6% for states and territories, 60.3%–86.2% for MMSAs, and 59.3%–89.7% for counties. Current cigarette smokers: 5.8%–26.8% for states and territories, 5.8%–28.5% for MMSAs, and 5.9%–29.8% for counties. Binge drinking during the preceding month: 6.6%–21.6% for states and territories, 3.6%–23.0% for MMSAs, and 3.8%–24.0% for counties. Heavy drinking during the preceding month: 2.0%–7.2% for states and territories, 1.0%–10.0% for MMSAs, and 1.0%–14.2% for counties. Adults reporting no leisure-time physical activity: 17.5%–42.3% for states and territories, 13.1%–37.6% for MMSAs, and 8.5%–39.0% for counties. Adults who were overweight: 32.6%–40.7% for states and territories, 28.5%–42.5% for MMSAs, and 27.2%–46.4% for counties. Adults aged ≥20 years who were obese: 22.1%–35.0% for states and territories, 17.1%–42.1% for MMSAs, and 13.3%–42.1% for counties. Adults with current asthma: 5.2%–11.1% for states and territories, 3.4%–14.5% for MMSAs, and 3.3%–14.6% for counties. Adults with diagnosed diabetes: 5.3%–13.2% for states and territories, 4.6%–15.4% for MMSAs, and 2.6%–18.8% for counties. Adults with limited activities because of physical, mental or emotional problems: 10.8%–28.2% for states and territories, 13.5%–38.3% for MMSAs, and 11.7%–32.0% for counties. Adults using special equipment because of any health problem: 2.8%–10.6% for states and territories, 4.5%–15.5% for MMSAs, and 1.3%–15.5% for counties. Adults aged ≥45 years who have had coronary heart disease: 5.3%–16.7% for states and territories, 6.5%–19.6% for MMSAs, and 4.9%–19.6% for counties. Adults aged ≥45 years who have had a stroke: 2.4%–7.1% for states and territories, 2.3%–8.8% for MSMAs, and 1.7%–8.8% for counties.

Interpretation: The findings in this report indicate substantial variations in the health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, access to health-care services, and the use of the preventive health services among U.S. adults at the state and territory, MMSA, and county levels. Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objectives were established to monitor health behaviors, conditions, and the use of preventive health services for the first decade of the 2000s. The findings in this report indicate that many of the HP 2010 objectives were not achieved by 2010. The findings underscore the continued need for surveillance of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases, and conditions and of the use of preventive health-care services.

Public Health Action: Local and state health departments and federal agencies use BRFSS data to identify populations at high risk for certain health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases, and conditions and to evaluate the use of preventive health-care services. BRFSS data also are used to direct, implement, monitor, and evaluate public health programs and policies that can lead to a reduction in morbidity and mortality from chronic conditions and corresponding health-risk behaviors.

Introduction

Chronic diseases (e.g., heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States (1,2). Engaging in healthy behaviors (e.g., quitting smoking and tobacco use, being more physically active, and eating a nutritious diet) and accessing preventive health-care services (e.g., routine physical checkups, screening for cancer, checking blood pressure, testing blood cholesterol, and receiving recommended vaccinations) can reduce morbidity and mortality from chronic and infectious disease and lower medical costs (3). Ongoing state-based surveillance is essential to identify health issues and disparities and to design, implement, and evaluate health programs and policies; surveillance data indicate that the estimated prevalence of health-risk factors, chronic conditions, and use of preventive services varies substantially across the United States (4,5).

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the world's largest ongoing telephone survey. Since 1984, CDC has assisted state and territorial health departments in conducting the BRFSS survey to track health conditions and health-risk behaviors. BRFSS is the one of the main sources of health information in the United States on chronic disease conditions, health-risk behaviors, emerging health problems, and the use of preventive health services. The data are used to set health goals and monitor public health progress at national, state, and local levels. Since 2002, the sufficient sample size in BRFSS has facilitated analysis of prevalence estimates from selected metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs), metropolitan divisions, and their counties.

Healthy People objectives represent national goals to prevent diseases, decrease morbidity and mortality, and promote health. These objectives include specific objectives to be achieved by the end of each decade and can be used to monitor and develop health promotions and disease prevention programs at the state and local levels (6). Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010) objectives were based on several national data sources. This analysis used BRFSS data to track health-risk behaviors during 2010 to determine if HP 2010 objectives were met by states and localities. Healthy People 2020 (HP 2020) is available at http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/default.aspx. Many of the HP 2020 objectives are continued from HP 2010. BRFSS provides data for state and local areas that might not be available from national data sources for these objectives. This report contains comparisons between 2010 BRFSS data and certain HP 2010 objectives related to chronic diseases, health-risk behaviors, and use of preventive health care services.

Methods

BRFSS is a cross-sectional, random-digit–dialed, state-based survey that includes annual data on approximately 400,000 adults aged ≥18 years who completed interviews (7). BRFSS uses a multistage sampling design to select a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population in each state and territory. Details of the validity and reliability of the BRFSS survey methodology have been described previously (8). This report provides comparable unweighted sample size, weighted prevalence estimates with standard errors and 95% confidence intervals for prevalence of selected risk behaviors, chronic conditions, use of preventive health-care services by states and territories, MMSAs, and counties.

Questionnaire

The standard BRFSS questionnaire comprises three parts: 1) core questions, 2) optional modules, and 3) state-added questions. Data collectors from all states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories ask the same core questions. The 2010 core questions included sections on demographics, health status, number of healthy days, health-care access, number of days feeling unrested, exercise, diagnosed diabetes, oral health, asthma, cardiovascular disease prevalence, disability (limited activity and use of special equipment), tobacco use, alcohol consumption, falls, seat belt use, drinking and driving, women's health, cancer screenings (colorectal cancer and breast cancer), immunization (seasonal influenza and pneumococcal vaccination), human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), emotional support, and life satisfaction. Optional modules were chosen on the basis of the needs of state health departments and specific state programs to address specific health-related topics. State-added questions were designed to address state-specific health issues or track a state's health objectives.

In 2010, the following optional modules were included to address specific health issues: diagnosed prediabetes (35 states), diagnosed diabetes (38 states), healthy day–related symptoms (one state), visual impairment and access to eye care (five states), excess sun exposure (four states), inadequate sleep (nine states), family planning (five states), adult asthma history (five states), arthritis burden (five states), high-risk/health-care worker (three states), shingles (six states), adult tetanus diphtheria (four states), adult human papilloma virus (HPV) (five states), cancer survivorship (10 states), caregiver (two states), reactions to race (three states), anxiety and depression (13 states), social context (two states), general preparedness (two states), veterans' health (two states), adverse childhood experience (five states), random child selection (42 states), childhood asthma prevalence (34 states), childhood immunization (24 states), and child HPV (six states).

To compare 2010 BRFSS results with the HP 2010 objectives, this report focuses on six areas: 1) health status indicators (reported good or better health, health-care coverage, and oral health), 2) preventive practices (routine checkup, influenza vaccination, and pneumococcal vaccination for persons aged ≥65 years), 3) cancer screening (sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy and blood stool test for persons aged ≥50 years and a Papanicolaou [Pap] test and a mammogram for women aged ≥40 years, 4) health-risk behaviors (current smoking, binge drinking, heavy drinking, and no leisure-time physical activity), 5) chronic conditions and disabilities (overweight or obesity for persons aged ≥20 years, current asthma, diagnosed diabetes, limited activities, and use of special equipment because of physical, mental, or emotional problems), and 6) cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease and stroke for persons aged ≥45 years). The details are in the 2010 BRFSS questionnaire; all the other documents are available on the BRFSS website (9).

Data Collection and Processing

Since 2007, BRFSS data have been collected monthly in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam. Trained interviewers administer the BRFSS survey using a computer-assisted telephone interviewing system. After the interview is conducted, data are submitted to CDC for editing, processing, weighting, reliability-checking, and analysis.

Data Weighting

At the end of the survey year, CDC edits and aggregates the monthly data files to create yearly samples for each state and territory. Each sample is weighted to the respondent's probability of selection and the age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-specific distribution of the population using 2010 postcensus projections for each state and territory. State-level weights are adjusted to produce MMSA- and county-level weights. These sampling weights are used to calculate BRFSS state-, territory-, MMSA-, and county-level prevalence estimates. MMSAs were defined by the Office of Management and Budget. Respondents were assigned to a particular MMSA on the basis of their Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) county code. Aggregated data at the state level were used to produce national prevalence estimates. Detailed weighting and analytic methodologies have been documented (10).

Statistical Analyses

Prevalence estimates, standard errors, and 95% confidence intervals were computed on the basis of a statistical analysis using weights and strata to account for the complex survey design. To avoid presenting unstable estimates, statistics for certain MMSAs and counties were not reported if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or the half-width of the 95% confidence interval was >10. MMSAs were included only if there were ≥500 respondents and ≥19 respondents in all the final weighting classes and counties. Within each MMSA or county, weighting classes were based on age and sex cross-classification totals or age, sex, and race cross-classification totals. Responses coded as "do not know" or "refused" were excluded from the analysis. The analysis was conducted using SAS-Callable SUDAAN Version 10.0.1 (Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina).

Results

In 2010, a total of 54 states and territories, 192 MMSAs and 302 counties with sufficient sample sizes were reported. A total of 451,075 respondents completed (n = 425,013) or partially completed (n = 26,062) interviews (range: 784 in Guam to 35,109 in Florida; median: 6,898). On the basis of the Council of American Survey and Research Organizations (CASRO) standards (11), the 2010 BRFSS cooperation rate (defined as the proportion of respondents interviewed of all eligible units in which a respondent was contacted and selected) ranged from 56.8% in California to 86.1% in Minnesota (median: 76.9%). The 2010 BRFSS CASRO rate (defined as the number of complete and partial interviews divided by an estimate of the number of eligible units) ranged from 39.1% in Oregon to 68.8% in Nebraska (median: 54.6%) (12). This report presents weighted prevalence estimates with 95% confidence intervals at the state, MMSA, and county levels in the following sections.

Health Status Indicators

Health Status

Respondents were asked to rate their general health as excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. The answers were then categorized into two groups: those who reported that their health was excellent, very good, or good and those who reported that their health was fair or poor. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 67.9% in Puerto Rico to 89.3% in Alaska (median: 85.0%) (Table 1). Among selected MMSAs, the self-reported prevalence estimate of good or better health ranged from 72.2% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio to 92.1% in Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts (median: 85.2%) (Table 2). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health ranged from 72.8% in Hinds County, Mississippi, to 95.8% in Douglas County, Colorado (median: 85.6%) (Table 3).

Health-Care Coverage

Health-care coverage was defined as any kind of coverage including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plan (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid). In 2010, the estimated prevalence of health-care coverage among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 69.4% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 95.7% in Massachusetts (median: 85.0%) (Table 4). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 45.7% in McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas, to 97.0% in Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts (median: 85.9%) (Table 5). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 45.7% in Hidalgo County, Texas, to 97.2% in Norfolk County, Massachusetts (median: 87.2%) (Table 6).

Oral Health

Dental Visit

Time since the most recent visit to a dentist or a dental clinic for any reason was measured. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of a dental visit within the previous year among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 57.2% in Oklahoma to 81.7% in Massachusetts (median: 69.7%) (Table 7). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 47.1% in Arcadia, Florida, to 83.5% in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota (median: 70.2%) (Table 8). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 47.1% in DeSoto County, Florida, to 88.2% in Middlesex County, Connecticut (median 72.4%) (Table 9).

All Natural Teeth Extracted

Oral health status was measured as the percentage of adults aged ≥65 years who had all of their permanent teeth removed (edentulism) because of tooth decay or gum diseases. In 2010, the estimated prevalence ranged from 7.4% in Hawaii to 36.0% in West Virginia (median: 17.1%) (Table 10). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.8% in San José-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California, to 34.8% in Charleston, West Virginia (median: 15.2%) (Table 11). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.4% in Santa Clara County, California, to 39.3% in Sullivan County, Tennessee (median: 14.4%) (Table 12).

Preventive Practices

Recent Routine Physical Checkup

A routine physical checkup was defined as a visit to a doctor for a general physical examination rather than for a specific injury, illness or condition. A recent routine checkup was categorized as one that occurred within the preceding 12 months. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of having a recent routine checkup among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 53.8% in Oregon to 80.0% in Massachusetts (median: 66.7%) (Table 13). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 49.5% in Eugene-Springfield, Oregon, to 82.6% in Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts (median: 67.0%) (Table 14). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 49.5% in Lane County, Oregon, to 85.3% in Plymouth County, Massachusetts (median: 68.0%) (Table 15).

Influenza Vaccination

In 2010, the estimated prevalence of receiving an influenza vaccination among adults aged ≥65 years during the preceding 12 months at the state level ranged from 26.9% in Puerto Rico to 73.4% in Colorado (median: 67.4%) (Table 16). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 51.7% in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida, to 77.1% in Barre, Vermont (median: 67.9%) (Table 17). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 49.3% in Miami-Dade County, Florida, to 87.8% in Douglas County, Colorado (median: 68.6%) (Table 18).

Pneumococcal Vaccination

In 2010, the estimated prevalence of ever having received a pneumonia injection or pneumococcal vaccine among adults aged ≥65 years ranged from 24.7% in Puerto Rico to 74.0% in Oregon (median: 68.6%) (Table 19). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 48.6% in Laredo, Texas, to 79.9% in Naples-Marco Island, Florida (median: 70.0%) (Table 20). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 47.6% in Hudson County, New Jersey, to 83.1% in Potter County, Texas (median: 70.6%) (Table 21).

Cancer Screening

Sigmoidoscopy or Colonoscopy

Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are examinations in which a tube is inserted into the rectum to view the colon and rectum for the signs of precancerous polyps and colorectal cancer. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of ever having sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy among adults aged ≥50 years ranged from 37.8% in Guam to 75.7% in Connecticut (median: 64.2%) (Table 22). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 37.3% in Laredo, Texas, to 79.9% in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota (median: 67.7%) (Table 23). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 37.3% in Webb county, Texas, to 82.5% in Washington County, Rhode Island (median: 68.8%) (Table 24).

Blood Stool Test

A blood stool test is one in which a special kit is used to determine whether the stool contains blood. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥50 years who had a blood stool test during the preceding 2 years ranged from 8.5% in Guam to 27.0% in California (median: 16.8%) (Table 25). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.7% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 51.3% in Tallahassee, Florida (median: 17.6%) (Table 26). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.8% in Utah County, Utah, to 57.2% in Leon County, Florida (median: 17.8%) (Table 27).

Papanicolaou Test

A Papanicolaou (Pap) test is a test for cancer of the cervix. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of women aged ≥18 years who had a Pap test during the preceding 3 years ranged from 67.8% in Guam to 88.9% in Massachusetts (median: 81.0%) (Table 28). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 63.3% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 91.2% in Peabody, Massachusetts (median: 82.4%) (Table 29). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 63.2% in Utah County, Utah, to 95.7% in Johnston County, North Carolina (median: 83.1%) (Table 30).

Mammogram

A mammogram is a radiograph of each breast to test for breast cancer. The state-specific estimated prevalence of having a mammogram during the preceding 2 years among women aged ≥40 years ranged from 63.8% in Idaho to 83.6% in Massachusetts (median: 75.2%) (Table 31). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 60.3% in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to 86.2% in Bangor, Maine (median: 76.5%) (Table 32). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 59.3% in Tooele County, Utah, to 89.7% in Queen Anne's County, Maryland (median: 77.1%) (Table 33).

Health-Risk Behaviors

Current Smoking

Current smoking was defined as having smoked at least 100 cigarettes in one's lifetime and reporting smoking every day or some days at the time of survey participation. The estimated prevalence of current smoking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 5.8% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 26.8% in West Virginia (median: 17.3%) (Table 34). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.8% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 28.5% in Tuscaloosa, Alabama (median: 17.4%) (Table 35). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.9% in Utah County, Utah, to 29.8% in Valencia County, New Mexico (median: 16.1%) (Table 36).

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking was defined for men aged ≥18 years as having on average five or more drinks during one occasion and for women aged ≥18 years as having on average four or more drinks on one occasion during the preceding month. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of binge drinking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 6.6% in Tennessee to 21.6% in Wisconsin (median: 15.1%) (Table 37). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.6% in Knoxville, Tennessee, to 23.0% in Kappa, Hawaii, and Key West-Marathon, Florida (median: 14.7%) (Table 38). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.8% in Utah County, Utah, to 24.0% in Suffolk County, Massachusetts (median: 15.1%) (Table 39).

Heavy Drinking

Heavy drinking was defined for men aged ≥18 years as having, on average, more than two drinks per day and for women aged ≥18 years as having, on average, more than one drink per day during the preceding month. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of heavy drinking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 2.0% in Tennessee to 7.2% in Vermont (median: 5.0%) (Table 40). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.0% in Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, Tennessee, to 10.0% in Key West-Marathon, Florida (median: 5.1%) (Table 41). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.0% in Tolland County, Connecticut, to 14.2% in Hampshire County, Massachusetts (median: 5.0%) (Table 42).

No Leisure-Time Physical Activity

No leisure-time physical activity was defined as nonparticipation in any physical activities (other than what is done during one's regular job) or exercises, such as running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking during the preceding month. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 17.5% in Oregon to 42.3% in Puerto Rico (median: 24.0%) (Table 43). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 13.1% in Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado, to 37.6% in Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 23.7%) (Table 44). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 8.5% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 39.0% in Caddo Parish, Louisiana (median: 22.8%) (Table 45).

Chronic Conditions and Disabilities

Overweight

Self-reported weight and height were used to calculate body mass index (BMI) (weight [kg]/height [m2]). Overweight was defined as BMI ≥25.0 and <30.0. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who were overweight ranged from 32.6% in Guam to 40.7% in Alaska (median: 36.2%) (Table 46). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 28.5% in Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado, to 42.5% in Atlantic City, New Jersey (median: 36.0%) (Table 47). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 27.2% in Dallas County, Texas, to 46.4% in Tolland County, Connecticut (median: 36.6%) (Table 48).

Obesity

Obesity was defined as BMI ≥30 among adults aged ≥20 years to compare with HP 2010 objectives. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥20 years who were obese ranged from 22.1% in Colorado to 35.0% in Mississippi (median: 28.5%) (Table 49). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 17.1% in Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut, and Key West-Marathon, Florida, to 42.1% in Wauchula, Florida (median: 28.3%) (Table 50). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 13.3% in Westchester County, New York, to 42.1% in Hardee County, Florida (median: 27.4%) (Table 51).

Current Asthma

Respondents aged ≥18 years were categorized as currently having asthma if they reported having ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had asthma and still had it during the survey. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of current asthma among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 5.2% in Guam to 11.1% in Vermont (median: 9.0%) (Table 52). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.4% in Laredo, Texas, to 14.5% in Rutland, Vermont (median: 9.0%) (Table 53). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.3% in Washington County, Arkansas, and Davidson County, Tennessee, to 14.6% in Bronx County, New York (median: 8.9%) (Table 54).

Diabetes

Diagnosed diabetes was defined as having ever been told by a doctor that respondents had diabetes, excluding gestational diabetes, pre-diabetes, or borderline diabetes. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 5.3% in Alaska to 13.2% in Alabama (median: 8.7%) (Table 55). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.6% in Gainesville, Florida, to 15.4% in Wauchula, Florida (median: 8.9%) (Table 56). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.6% in Summit County, Utah, to 18.8% in Gadsden County, Florida (median: 8.6%) (Table 57).

Limited Activities

The estimated prevalence of reported limited activities in any way because of physical, mental, or emotional problems among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 10.8% in Guam to 28.2% in West Virginia (median: 20.8%) (Table 58). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 13.5% in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota, to 38.3% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 20.6%) (Table 59). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 11.7% in Cass County, North Dakota, to 32.0% in Lane County, Oregon (median: 20.3%) (Table 60).

Use of Special Equipment

Respondents were asked whether any of their health problems required them to use special equipment (cane, wheelchair, special bed, or special telephone). The estimated prevalence of use of special equipment as a result of any health problems among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 2.8% in Guam to 10.6% in Mississippi (median: 7.5%) (Table 61). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.5% in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota, to 15.5% in Homosassa Springs, Florida (median: 7.5%) (Table 62). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.3% in Summit County, Utah, to 15.5% in Citrus County, Florida (median: 7.4%) (Table 63).

Cardiovascular Diseases

Coronary Heart Disease

Respondents were classified as having coronary heart disease if they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had coronary heart disease including heart attack (myocardial infarction) and angina. The estimated prevalence of coronary heart disease among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 5.3% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 16.7% in Puerto Rico (median: 10.9%) (Table 64). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.5% in Honolulu, Hawaii, to 19.6% in Homosassa Springs, Florida (median: 10.7%) (Table 65). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.9% in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, to 19.6% in Citrus County, Florida (median: 10.4%) (Table 66).

Stroke

Respondents were classified as having had a stroke if they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health-care professional that they had a history of stroke. In 2010, the estimated prevalence of stroke among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 2.4% in the U.S. Virgin Islands to 7.1% in Oklahoma (median: 4.5%) (Table 67). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.3% in Rutland, Vermont, to 8.8% in Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida (median: 4.4%) (Table 68). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.7% in Benton County, Arkansas, and Queen Anne's County, Maryland, and Catawba County, North Carolina, to 8.8% in Polk County, Florida, and Buncombe County, North Carolina (median: 4.3%) (Table 69).

Discussion

Substantial variations exist in the estimated prevalence of health status and risk behaviors, the use of preventive practices and cancer preventions, chronic conditions, cardiovascular diseases, and disability among U.S. adults at the levels of state and territory, MMSA, and county. The geographic variations in these estimates might reflect differences in demographics, socioeconomic status, spatial variation in social desirability, state laws or local ordinances, the availability of access to health-care facilities, the use of preventive health-care services, and the coverage of preventive screenings by insurance providers. These estimates can be used by local health-care policymakers and public health advisors to identify the burdens of health risks, monitor the change in the health-risk behaviors and diseases, and implement prevention strategies. Of note, the findings in this report reflect the direct (nonmodel-based) estimation methods selected, and the use of other methods might yield different results for certain variables.

HP 2010 set out the objectives of improvement in health status and public awareness of reduction in health-risk behavior to be achieved by 2010. However, the measures of some of the variables in BRFSS might be different from the other databases used to develop the HP 2010 objectives, and therefore some of the HP 2010 objective targets might not apply directly to the BRFSS data. Overall, the findings provided in this report indicate that certain HP 2010 goals (e.g., health-care insurance coverage and vaccination against influenza and pneumococcal diseases) were not met at any state or local level.

Health Status Indicators

Health Status

Self-reported health status usually rates the participant's own general health as excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. Although it is a simple measure, it encompasses multidimensional health conditions and behaviors including physical and mental health, activity limitation, and health behavior risks (13). The measure of the overall health has been proved to be valid (14,15). Poor self-assessed general health has been found to be linked with socioeconomic status and subsequent mortality in a U.S. multiethnic cohort (16). In this report, self-reported health status measured respondents who reported that their health was excellent, very good, or good compared with those who reported that their health was fair or poor. The estimated prevalence of good or better health varied across states, territories, MMSAs, and counties, suggesting the geographic variations in the patterns of health-care access, treatment, and severity of chronic conditions.

Health-Care Coverage

In 2009, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 50.7 million persons in the United States were without health-care coverage (17), and in 2010, one in four adults aged 18–64 years was not insured (18). This problem affects not only persons living in poverty but also middle-class persons. Persons without health-care coverage are less likely to receive preventive services or have adequate access to health care, and the uninsured also are more likely than their insured counterparts to receive a diagnosis of advanced-stage cancer, suffer from chronic-condition complications, and require emergency care. The advanced stages of these illnesses are associated with elevated mortality rates and increased medical costs (18,19). By 2010, no state or territory, MMSAs, or county achieved the HP 2010 objective (objective no. 1-1) (6) of 100% health-care coverage among residents (Table 70).

Oral Health

Dental caries is a demineralization of the tooth caused by bacterial infection. More than 25% of children aged 2–5 years and 50% of those aged 12–15 years have tooth decay (20). Routine dental visits and treatments can help prevent and control the most common oral diseases, which are dental caries (tooth decay) and periodontal diseases. The HP 2010 objective was to increase the proportion of children and adults who use the oral health-care system each year to 56% (objective no. 21-10) (Table 70). In 2010, a total of 4.2% of MMSAs and 4.6% of counties did not meet the target. However, BRFSS data on dental visits in the past year might be underestimated because children aged <18 years were not included in the questionnaire. Periodontal disease and dental caries are the leading causes for tooth loss and edentulism (21–23). Edentulism also is associated with poor oral hygiene, lack of access to oral health care, and lower socioeconomic status (24). Persons with complete edentulism are more likely to be smokers and to face elevated risk for poor nutrition and comorbidities such as diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis (25,26). The HP 2010 objective was to reduce the percentage of persons having had all their natural teeth extracted to less than 22% among adults aged ≥65 years (objective no. 21-4) (Table 70). In 2010, a total of 16.7% of the states and territories, 14.6% of MMSAs, and 10.6% of counties did not achieve that goal.

Preventive Practices

Routine Physical Checkup

A routine physical checkup is an important tool to help maintain good health, diagnose health problems in early stages, and prevent or control chronic diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Being a younger adult, being unmarried, having a lower household income, lacking health insurance, and not participating in regular physical activity usually are associated with being less likely to receive a recent routine checkup (27). In 2010, a substantial geographic variation existed in the estimated prevalence of recent routine checkups in states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. Addressing health disparity and access to health care can improve the rates of routine checkups (28).

Pneumococcal and Influenza Vaccination

Pneumococcal disease is a type of bacterial infection that can cause pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia, which is a major source of morbidity and mortality among the very young and elderly (29,30). Overall, the case-facility rate is 15%–20% (31) and 30%–40% among the elderly, especially those with chronic conditions (32–34). Influenza also is a major cause of mortality and morbidity among the same groups at high risk for pneumococcal disease: the very young, the elderly, and those with high-risk conditions. Influenza-related complications are responsible for approximately 200,000 hospitalizations every year (35). Influenza epidemics caused approximately 3,000 deaths in 1976 and approximately 49,000 deaths in 2007. During this period, 90% of influenza-caused mortality occurred among the elderly (36). Pneumococcal disease, influenza, and the medical cost caused by the diseases can be largely reduced and controlled by vaccinations, especially among the elderly population, which is a high-risk group (37,38). The HP 2010 objectives set out to increase the proportion of adults vaccinated against influenza and pneumococcal diseases to 90% among persons aged ≥65 years (objective nos. 14-29a and 14-29b) (Table 70). This direct estimate might yield different results from season-specific estimates generated by CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (39). In 2010, no state or territory, MMSA, or county achieved the objective. Strategies that continue to improve immunization rates could be helpful at state and local levels (40).

Cancer Prevention

Colorectal Cancer Screening

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States. In 2008, a total of 142,950 new cases and 52,857 deaths from colorectal cancer occurred (41). Over the last 2 decades, incidence and mortality have decreased, especially during 1998–2007, primarily because of the increase in screenings that detect and remove adenomatous polyps before cancer develops (42). The guidelines recommend that persons aged ≥50 years receive a colonoscopy, preferably a flexible sigmoidoscopy, if available, or a fecal occult blood test (43). The HP 2010 objective is to increase the number of persons who have had a fecal occult blood test within the previous 2 years to 33% (objective no. 3-12a) (Table 70). No state or territory achieved the goal in 2010; 2.1% of MMSAs and 3.6% of counties did. The target for sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy is 50% (objective no. 3-12b) (Table 70). The goal was achieved by all states and territories except for Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands; all MMSAs except for Laredo, Texas, and Del Rio, Texas; and all counties except for Webb County, Texas, Val Verde County, Texas, and Passaic County, New Jersey.

Cervical Cancer Screening

Cervical cancer continues to be a public health issue with 12,410 new cases and 4,008 deaths in 2008 (44). The primary cause of cervical cancer is HPV. All women are at risk for developing cervical cancer with the highest incidence in women aged >30 years (45). Racial/ethnic and age disparities exist in the late stage of diagnosis and the incidence rate (46,47). Cervical cancer can be detected early with Pap tests. By detecting precancerous lesions, Pap tests have contributed to the decreasing incidence and mortality rates over the previous 2 decades (47). Since 2003, the rates have remained stable (42). In 2008, the age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer were 8.0 and 2.6 per 100,000 females (48). Women aged ≥21 years should receive the Pap test to screen for cervical cancer at least every 3 years until age 65 years (49). The HP 2010 objective is to increase the use of Pap test within the preceding 3 years to 90% among women aged ≥18 years (objective no. 3-11b) (Table 70). In 2010, no state or territory achieved the target; 3.1% of MMSAs and 7.6% of counties achieved this goal.

Breast Cancer Screening

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer (excluding skin cancer) and second leading cause of cancer mortality in women. In 2008, a total of 210,203 women had breast cancer diagnosed, and 40,589 women died of this cancer (50). In 2012, an estimated 226,870 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women and an estimated 2,190 new cases are expected to occur among men in the United States; approximately 39,920 breast cancer-specific deaths are estimated to occur (42). There are varieties of risk factors for breast cancer. Older age is associated with the higher likelihood of having breast cancer (51). Women with a family history of breast cancer might carry genetic mutations that contribute to elevated risk for the disease (52). Mammograms are an important diagnostic tool for early detection of breast cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force currently recommends biennial screening mammography for women aged 50–74 years. During 1975–2000, the breast cancer specific mortality rate declined approximately 46% at least in part as a result of the use of mammograms (53). The HP 2010 objective is to increase the mammography rate to 70% (objective no. 3-13) (Table 70). In 2010, approximately 79.6% of states and territories, 87.5% of MMSAs, and 89.1% of counties achieved this goal.

Health-Risk Behaviors

Cigarette Smoking

Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of disease and deaths in the United States (54,55). Many diseases (including many types of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and COPD) are attributable to smoking (54). Cigarette smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals; hundreds of them are toxic, and many cause cancer (56). During 1965–2005, the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults aged ≥18 years declined from 42.4% (57) to 20.9%; during 2005–2010, prevalence declined from 20.9%–19.3% (58). Smokers are more likely to be men, aged <65 years, and non-Hispanic American Indians or Alaska Natives as well as to have a low educational level and to live below the poverty level (58). The HP 2010 objective was to reduce the overall prevalence of cigarette smoking to 12% (objective no. 27-1a) (Table 70). Not all states and territories, MMSAs, or counties achieved the goal: 5.6% of states and territories, 10.9% of MMSAs, and 15.9% of counties met the goal. These findings suggest a need for continuing sustained and adequately funded tobacco control efforts at the state and local level (58,59).

Binge and Heavy Drinking

Excessive alcohol consumption, including binge and heavy drinking, is a leading preventable cause of death in the United States and accounted for an estimated average of 80,000 deaths and >2.3 million years of potential life lost (YPLL) each year during 2001–2005 (60) and for an estimated $223.5 billion in lost productivity, criminal justice costs, and health-care expenditures (61). Excessive alcohol use is a risk factor for many adverse health and social outcomes, including unintentional injuries (e.g., motor-vehicle accidents), violence, suicide, hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, certain cancers, sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy, fetal alcohol syndrome, and sudden infant death (62). The differences in binge and heavy drinking among states and territories, MMSAs, and counties might reflect cultural factors (63) and differences in state and local laws that affect the price, availability, and marketing of alcoholic beverages (64). Evidence-based population-level strategies to reduce and prevent excessive alcohol use and its related harms (e.g., measures to control access to alcohol and to increase prices) have been recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force (65).

No Leisure-Time Physical Activity

The risk for many chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and some types of cancers can be reduced by engaging in physical activity. Physical activity also aids in weight control (66). The HP 2010 objective measures the proportion of adults aged ≥18 years who never or were unable to engage in light or moderate or vigorous exercise for at least 20 minutes. The objective is to reduce the proportion of adults aged ≥18 years engaging in no leisure-time physical activity to 20%. The 2010 BRFSS survey measured the proportion of adults aged ≥18 years who never engaged in any physical activity during the previous month. Because these two data sources used different questions and time frames to assess participation in leisure time physical activity, BRFSS prevalence estimates cannot be compared directly with the HP 2010 objective. However, BRFSS data indicate that continued efforts are required to increase the leisure-time physical activity of the population at state and territory, and local levels. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services published recommended amounts of physical activity for older adults, adults, children and adolescents, women during pregnancy, adults with disabilities, and persons with chronic medical conditions (66). Strategies to encourage persons to become more physically active are identified by the Community Guide (67) and by the U.S. National Physical Activity Plan (68).

Chronic Conditions

Overweight and Obesity

Recent data using participants' measured weight and height indicate that among adults aged ≥20 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥30) and overweight and obesity combined (BMI ≥25) are 35.7% and 68.8%, respectively (69). There are also racial and ethnic disparities in the temporal trend of prevalence of obesity in the United States (69). The prevalence of overweight and obesity remains a critical public health problem. Obesity is also an economic burden in the United States. In 2008, the associated medical cost of obesity was estimated to be $147 billion. Obesity is associated with numerous chronic conditions, diseases, and events including high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, stroke, type II diabetes, certain types of cancer, sleep apnea, osteoarthritis, infertility, and mental health conditions (70). Overweight and obesity are associated with mortality from diabetes (71). Obesity is associated with mortality from obesity-related cancers (72). A large prospective study demonstrated that obesity is strongly associated with risk for death regardless of sex, race, or ethnic group (73). The HP 2010 objective is to reduce the proportion of adults aged ≥20 years who are obese to 15% (objective no. 19-2). No state or territory or MMSA achieved this goal in 2010 (Table 70). Only three counties (Westchester County, New York; New York County, New York; and San Francisco County, California) met the target goal. However, the HP 2010 goal is based on measured weight and height whereas BRFSS is a self-reported survey. The obesity prevalence from self-reported data tends to be underestimated (74). Comprehensive strategies to improve nutrition and increase physical activity are needed and should be implemented across multiple settings and sectors to address the high prevalence of overweight and obesity and their public health burden (75,76).

Asthma

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects persons of all ages and is characterized by episodic and reversible attacks of wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing (77). In 2001, a total of 20.3 million persons in the United States had received a diagnosis of asthma. By 2010, 25.7 million U.S. residents had received an asthma diagnosis (78,79). Certain environmental factors exacerbate asthma, including exposure to tobacco smoke, allergens, air pollution, microbial substances, infection, and diet (80). Although asthma cannot be cured, symptoms can be controlled with appropriate medical treatment, self-management education, and avoidance of exposure to environmental allergens and irritants that can trigger an attack (81). In 2010, the overall median prevalence of current asthma was 9.0% (interquartile range: 5.2%–11.1%). The variability in the estimated prevalence of asthma existed at MMSAs and county levels.

Diabetes

Diabetes is caused by lack of insulin in the body (Type I diabetes) and insulin resistance (Type II diabetes). The complications of diabetes are serious and extensive; they include vision loss, lower-extremity amputation, skin complications (e.g., itching and bacterial and fungal infection), heart and kidney diseases, periodontitis, poor mental health, neuropathy, and stroke, and they involve many other organs and tissues (82). Diabetic patients face elevated risks of developing cancer (83). An estimated 25.8 million persons in the United States have diabetes, including 7.0 million persons who have not received a diagnosis (84). In 2010, approximately 1.9 million adults aged ≥20 years received a new diagnosis of diabetes. In 2010, the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes at the state level ranged from 5.3%–13.2%. Persons with diabetes have shorter life expectancy and increased mortality compared with persons without diabetes. By 2050, new incidence of diabetes is expected to be 15 cases per 1,000 persons (85). In 2007, diabetes cost the United States approximately $174 billion (86). Eating right and being active can help to prevent type II diabetes. Given the high prevalence of diabetes and its likely future burden, implementation of effective interventions and strategies that can reduce risk for obesity and encourage physical activity, particularly among high-risk populations, can help to lower diabetes rates and keep existing diagnosed cases of the disease in better control. The National Diabetes Prevention Program aims to prevent or delay diabetes by bringing the evidence-based lifestyle change program to the community level (87).

Disability

Approximately 50 million persons in the United States live with a disability, which includes mental impairment or difficulties with hearing, vision, movement, thinking, remembering, learning, communication, and social relationships (88). Physical limitations can require the use of special equipment. Disability usually is associated with low socioeconomic status. Persons with disabilities are more likely to be poor and have barriers to education and employment (89). There is a racial disparity of self-reported health status among persons with disabilities (90). Many persons with disabilities also have at least one chronic condition (e.g., obesity, diabetes, depression, or mental illness). They are more likely to use an emergency department, to be hospitalized, and to have limited health-care access (91,92). Persons with disabilities account for 43% of Medicaid health-care expenditures (93). In 2005, among the total population, 18.7% had some level of disability, and 12.0% had a severe disability (94). Although the severe disability rate declined among the elderly population during the last 2 decades, the disability rate has increased among working-aged persons, especially among the obese population (95). Compared with the medians of prevalence of use of special equipment in 2008 (7.2%) and 2009 (7.0%), the rate did not decline in 2010 (7.5%). As the U.S. population ages, the need to improve quality of life, increase access to special equipment, and prevent hospital-associated disability complications among the disabled population will continue to be important (96).

Cardiovascular Diseases

Coronary Heart Disease

The most common type of heart disease is coronary heart disease, which is caused by the buildup of plaque that narrows the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart (97). Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States (98). One in six deaths in 2010 could be attributed to coronary heart disease (99). In 2010, estimates from BRFSS data indicated that prevalence of coronary heart disease ranged from 5.3%–16.7% at the state level. Since the Framingham Heart Study, many risk factors are known to be associated with coronary heart disease, including age, sex, smoking status, diabetes, unhealthy systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol, and high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (100,101). Chronic conditions including diabetes mellitus, obesity, high blood pressure, a low level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a high level of low-density lipoprotein are associated with developing coronary heart disease, as are unhealthy behaviors (e.g., tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, diets high in fat and sodium, and physical inactivity); being older, male, black or of American Indian descent; and having a family history of the disease (97,102). Risk for coronary heart disease can be lowered by maintaining a healthy lifestyle (including quitting smoking, losing weight, monitoring blood pressure, and controlling blood cholesterol by following a low-fat diet and engaging in regular aerobic exercise). Adopting guidelines that encourage healthy lifestyle choices and control of diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol can help lower overall rates of heart disease (103).

Stroke

Cerebrovascular disease is the fourth leading cause of mortality in United States (2). In 2010, stroke was responsible for one out of 18 deaths in the United States (99). Stroke occurs when a clot blocks the blood supply to the brain or a blood vessel in the brain bursts (104). If nonfatal, stroke can cause severe long-term physical disability (e.g., paralysis and speech problems). Each year, approximately 795,000 persons in the United States have new or recurrent strokes (105). The direct medical cost for stroke was $28.3 billion in 2010 and has been projected to be $95.6 billion in 2030 (106). The dominant risk factors associated with stroke are high blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, atrial fibrillation, current cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity. The incidence and treatment vary by age, gender, and race. Females are older than males at stroke onset (107). Blacks had a higher prevalence of stroke than whites (108). As a risk factor for ischemic stroke, dyslipidemia was less likely to be discovered, treated, or controlled in blacks than whites (109). Education and prevention programs that target high-risk populations can help cut rates of stroke. The recommendation and guidelines to prevent stroke are provided by CDC (110).

Importance of Reducing Health-Risk Behaviors

The health-risk behaviors and chronic conditions are correlated. For instance, prenatal and passive smoking exposure could increase the incidence of asthma (111). Binge drinking is not only deleterious to health but also contributes to high health-care costs attributable to alcohol-related crime, as well as productivity loss and other burdens to the community (61). Reducing unhealthy risk behaviors and improving adherence to preventive care could help to prevent the occurrence of the chronic conditions and ultimately decrease mortality and morbidity risk for all members of a community.

Limitations

The findings in this report are subject to at least five limitations. First, BRFSS is a household survey that does not collect information from persons in institutions, nursing homes, long-term–care facilities, military installations, and correctional institutions. For this reason, the results cannot be generalized to these populations. Second, increasing use of cell-phone–only households and telephone number portability might decrease the response rate in BRFSS landline surveys (112). In 2009, BRFSS began to collect data on cell-phone–only households as well as on traditional landline households. However, the data are not available for all states and territories and therefore are not included in this report. Third, although BRFSS is conducted in multiple languages (including English, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, and Portuguese), data are not collected from persons speaking other languages or different dialects, so these persons are not able to participate. Fourth, as a result of the sample size or unreliable estimates, the prevalence for certain health indicators could not be obtained at certain MMSA and county levels. Finally, the data are self-reported and thus are subject to recall bias. Despite these limitations, BRFSS is a cost-effective, timely, and flexible survey that provides reliable estimates of health status, health-risk behaviors, chronic conditions, disabilities, and access to preventive services at national, state, and local levels. Although different national surveys have different data collection modes and sampling frames, the fact that there are overall similarities in the prevalence estimates between BRFSS and other national surveys supports the reliability of BRFSS data (113,114). BRFSS is the only timely source of data available to many states and communities to assess local health conditions and to track progress of health promotion programs and strategies accurately (115).

Conclusion

The results in this report indicate the importance of continuing efforts to increase health-care coverage, vaccination against influenza and pneumococcal diseases, and use of cancer prevention services as well as to improve oral health and to decrease health-risk behaviors at state and local levels. In addition, BRFSS data can be used to identify emerging public health problems, help implement health policies and prevention programs at different stakeholder levels, and continue to monitor health problems during the next decade as the country moves toward achieving HP 2020 objectives (116).

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TABLE 1. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

State/Territory

Sample
size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

7,645

78.8

0.6

(77.6–80.0)

Alaska

1,952

89.3

0.9

(87.5–91.1)

Arizona

5,625

84.2

0.8

(82.6–85.8)

Arkansas

4,013

80.9

0.9

(79.1–82.6)

California

17,767

81.9

0.4

(81.1–82.7)

Colorado

11,605

87.7

0.5

(86.8–88.6)

Connecticut

6,688

89.0

0.5

(88.0–89.9)

Delaware

4,244

86.3

0.7

(85.0–87.7)

District of Columbia

3,909

88.3

0.7

(87.0–89.6)

Florida

34,975

82.9

0.4

(82.0–83.7)

Georgia

5,773

84.0

0.6

(82.8–85.2)

Hawaii

6,548

85.8

0.6

(84.6–87.1)

Idaho

6,992

84.6

0.6

(83.4–85.8)

Illinois

5,197

84.5

0.7

(83.1–85.9)

Indiana

10,175

83.5

0.5

(82.5–84.6)

Iowa

6,087

88.5

0.5

(87.5–89.5)

Kansas

8,551

86.6

0.5

(85.7–87.5)

Kentucky

8,047

78.5

0.7

(77.1–79.8)

Louisiana

7,019

78.9

0.6

(77.6–80.1)

Maine

8,112

85.3

0.5

(84.3–86.3)

Maryland

9,164

87.0

0.5

(86.0–88.0)

Massachusetts

16,262

88.4

0.4

(87.7–89.2)

Michigan

8,848

85.8

0.5

(84.8–86.7)

Minnesota

8,942

89.1

0.6

(88.0–90.3)

Mississippi

8,071

76.3

0.7

(75.0–77.7)

Missouri

5,417

83.6

0.7

(82.1–85.0)

Montana

7,282

85.0

0.7

(83.7–86.4)

Nebraska

16,351

88.0

0.5

(87.1–88.9)

Nevada

3,906

83.0

1.0

(81.0–85.0)

New Hampshire

5,949

88.4

0.5

(87.4–89.4)

New Jersey

12,400

85.3

0.5

(84.4–86.2)

New Mexico

6,987

81.7

0.7

(80.4–83.0)

New York

8,919

85.3

0.5

(84.4–86.2)

North Carolina

12,096

81.9

0.5

(80.9–83.0)

North Dakota

4,753

86.9

0.6

(85.7–88.2)

Ohio

9,816

83.9

0.5

(82.9–84.9)

Oklahoma

7,706

79.5

0.6

(78.3–80.6)

Oregon

5,049

84.2

0.7

(82.8–85.6)

Pennsylvania

11,208

84.2

0.4

(83.4–85.1)

Rhode Island

6,463

87.2

0.5

(86.1–88.2)

South Carolina

9,354

82.4

0.7

(81.1–83.8)

South Dakota

6,706

88.5

0.5

(87.4–89.5)

Tennessee

5,749

80.5

0.8

(79.0–82.0)

Texas

17,981

82.6

0.5

(81.6–83.7)

Utah

10,140

88.3

0.5

(87.4–89.2)

Vermont

6,780

89.2

0.4

(88.4–90.1)

Virginia

5,366

86.0

0.7

(84.6–87.4)

Washington

19,574

86.5

0.3

(85.8–87.1)

West Virginia

4,394

76.6

0.8

(75.1–78.1)

Wisconsin

4,769

86.4

0.7

(85.0–87.9)

Wyoming

5,828

87.6

0.5

(86.5–88.6)

Guam

783

81.9

1.7

(78.7–85.2)

Puerto Rico

3,535

67.9

1.0

(66.0–69.9)

Virgin Islands

1,797

85.0

1.1

(82.9–87.1)

Median

85.0

Range

67.9–89.3

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.


TABLE 2. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95%CI)

Akron, Ohio

808

85.5

1.6

(82.3–88.6)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

2,194

83.6

1.1

(81.4–85.7)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

1,087

85.8

1.4

(83.0–88.5)

Amarillo, Texas

827

83.2

1.6

(80.0–86.3)

Arcadia, Florida

502

74.0

3.6

(66.9–81.0)

Asheville, North Carolina

547

83.6

1.8

(80.0–87.1)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

2,347

87.1

0.9

(85.3–88.8)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

915

79.9

1.8

(76.3–83.4)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

873

83.5

1.6

(80.3–86.6)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

653

86.7

1.8

(83.1–90.2)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

972

86.2

2.9

(80.5–91.8)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

3,336

86.3

0.8

(84.7–87.8)

Bangor, Maine

687

83.7

1.7

(80.3–87.0)

Barre, Vermont

669

90.5

1.2

(88.1–92.8)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,198

82.1

1.3

(79.5–84.6)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland

1,634

91.1

0.9

(89.3–92.8)

Billings, Montana

536

85.9

2.0

(81.9–89.8)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

1,196

82.3

1.3

(79.7–84.8)

Bismarck, North Dakota

769

88.1

1.2

(85.7–90.4)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

1,662

84.7

1.1

(82.5–86.8)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts

3,305

89.5

0.7

(88.1–90.8)

Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington

920

88.8

1.3

(86.2–91.3)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

2,153

90.6

1.0

(88.6–92.5)

Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Tonawanda, New York

607

85.0

1.8

(81.4–88.5)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

1,991

91.3

0.7

(89.9–92.6)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts

3,015

92.1

0.6

(90.9–93.2)

Camden, New Jersey

1,700

85.7

1.1

(83.5–87.8)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

745

84.4

1.5

(81.4–87.3)

Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Florida

518

83.5

2.3

(78.9–88.0)

Casper, Wyoming

767

85.6

1.6

(82.4–88.7)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

557

91.3

1.3

(88.7–93.8)

Charleston, West Virginia

768

75.8

1.9

(72.0–79.5)

Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina

1,146

84.8

1.9

(81.0–88.5)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

1,701

85.3

1.2

(82.9–87.6)

Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia

536

79.3

2.5

(74.4–84.2)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

914

85.1

1.5

(82.1–88.0)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

5,011

84.3

0.8

(82.7–85.8)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

1,793

86.0

1.1

(83.8–88.1)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

1,097

85.3

1.3

(82.7–87.8)

Coeur d´Alene, Idaho

568

87.5

1.8

(83.9–91.0)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,163

87.4

1.2

(85.0–89.7)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,135

83.6

1.6

(80.4–86.7)

Columbus, Ohio

1,385

84.2

1.4

(81.4–86.9)

Concord, New Hampshire

628

89.0

1.6

(85.8–92.1)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas

719

86.9

1.7

(83.5–90.2)

Dayton, Ohio

849

82.9

2.3

(78.3–87.4)

Del Rio, Texas

557

77.5

3.5

(70.6–84.3)

Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, Florida

859

78.9

2.1

(74.7–83.0)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

4,818

90.2

0.5

(89.2–91.1)

Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa

1,005

90.4

1.1

(88.2–92.5)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan

1,909

81.5

1.4

(78.7–84.2)

Dover, Delaware

1,254

82.8

1.2

(80.4–85.1)

Durham, North Carolina

1,031

86.9

1.5

(83.9–89.8)

Edison, New Jersey

2,266

86.4

1.0

(84.4–88.3)

El Paso, Texas

868

77.2

1.8

(73.6–80.7)

Eugene-Springfield, Oregon

511

83.4

2.1

(79.2–87.5)

Evansville, Indiana-Kentucky

535

81.9

2.0

(77.9–85.8)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

833

90.2

1.7

(86.8–93.5)

Farmington, New Mexico

685

84.7

1.9

(80.9–88.4)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

700

89.4

1.6

(86.2–92.5)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

560

92.0

1.6

(88.8–95.1)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

720

85.2

1.6

(82.0–88.3)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas

735

85.6

1.7

(82.2–88.9)

Gainesville, Florida

949

89.9

1.6

(86.7–93.0)


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95%CI)

Grand Island, Nebraska

858

83.9

1.8

(80.3–87.4)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

621

86.3

1.9

(82.5–90.0)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

1,157

82.6

1.6

(79.4–85.7)

Greenville, South Carolina

772

84.5

1.7

(81.1–87.8)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

644

85.5

1.7

(82.1–88.8)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

1,996

88.3

0.9

(86.5–90.0)

Hastings, Nebraska

587

86.5

1.7

(83.1–89.8)

Helena, Montana

638

87.6

1.8

(84.0–91.1)

Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina

599

77.5

2.3

(72.9–82.0)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,480

85.1

1.2

(82.7–87.4)

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina

798

87.0

1.8

(83.4–90.5)

Homosassa Springs, Florida

532

79.0

2.2

(74.6–83.3)

Honolulu, Hawaii

2,957

86.1

0.8

(84.5–87.6)

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas

2,735

83.5

1.3

(80.9–86.0)

Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio

657

72.2

2.3

(67.6–76.7)

Idaho Falls, Idaho

666

87.1

1.5

(84.1–90.0)

Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana

2,246

85.9

1.0

(83.9–87.8)

Jackson, Mississippi

758

79.3

1.8

(75.7–82.8)

Jacksonville, Florida

2,584

83.0

1.3

(80.4–85.5)

Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii

1,466

86.7

1.3

(84.1–89.2)

Kalispell, Montana

699

85.4

2.0

(81.4–89.3)

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas

3,377

87.2

0.9

(85.4–88.9)

Kapaa, Hawaii

645

83.9

1.9

(80.1–87.6)

Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington

647

84.6

2.0

(80.6–88.5)

Key West-Marathon, Florida

505

87.3

1.7

(83.9–90.6)

Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia

650

76.4

2.6

(71.3–81.4)

Knoxville, Tennessee

530

82.9

2.2

(78.5–87.2)

Lake City, Florida

564

78.2

2.4

(73.4–82.9)

Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida

519

80.6

2.3

(76.0–85.1)

Laredo, Texas

916

78.2

1.5

(75.2–81.1)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

502

76.6

2.8

(71.1–82.0)

Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada

1,266

82.6

1.4

(79.8–85.3)

Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont

1,541

89.0

1.0

(87.0–90.9)

Lewiston, Idaho-Washington

601

82.0

1.9

(78.2–85.7)

Lewiston-Auburn, Maine

501

84.5

1.9

(80.7–88.2)

Lincoln, Nebraska

1,133

91.6

1.3

(89.0–94.1)

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas

820

83.5

1.9

(79.7–87.2)

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California

2,617

79.4

1.0

(77.4–81.3)

Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana

905

82.6

1.6

(79.4–85.7)

Lubbock, Texas

776

81.7

2.2

(77.3–86.0)

Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire

1,401

89.8

1.0

(87.8–91.7)

McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas

593

75.7

2.2

(71.3–80.0)

Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas

1,155

81.8

1.7

(78.4–85.1)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida

1,027

84.7

1.5

(81.7–87.6)

Midland, Texas

523

84.6

2.0

(80.6–88.5)

Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin

1,530

84.3

1.5

(81.3–87.2)

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin

4,860

90.7

0.8

(89.1–92.2)

Minot, North Dakota

556

86.7

1.6

(83.5–89.8)

Mobile, Alabama

678

78.1

2.1

(73.9–82.2)

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

554

84.5

2.0

(80.5–88.4)

Naples-Marco Island, Florida

520

81.9

3.2

(75.6–88.1)

Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, Tennessee

830

87.5

1.3

(84.9–90.0)

Nassau-Suffolk, New York

1,070

89.5

1.1

(87.3–91.6)

Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania

3,317

86.4

0.8

(84.8–87.9)

New Haven-Milford, Connecticut

1,656

88.5

1.0

(86.5–90.4)

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana

1,534

80.5

1.3

(77.9–83.0)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey

6,181

84.1

0.6

(82.9–85.2)

Norfolk, Nebraska

675

86.7

1.7

(83.3–90.0)

North Platte, Nebraska

North Port-Bradenton-Sarasota, Florida

578

1,132

84.8

87.7

1.8

1.1

(81.2–88.3)

(85.5–89.8)

Ocala, Florida

588

76.9

2.5

(72.0–81.8)

Ocean City, New Jersey

519

85.9

1.7

(82.5–89.2)

Ogden-Clearfield, Utah

1,694

87.5

1.3

(84.9–90.0)


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95%CI)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,466

81.8

1.0

(79.8–83.7)

Olympia, Washington

775

89.3

1.2

(86.9–91.6)

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa

2,357

89.3

0.8

(87.7–90.8)

Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida

2,670

82.1

1.1

(79.9–84.2)

Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Florida

527

82.0

2.3

(77.4–86.5)

Panama City-Lynn Haven, Florida

Peabody, Massachusetts

544

2,131

85.2

86.6

1.8

1.4

(81.6–88.7)

(83.8–89.3)

Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Florida

1,012

84.1

1.4

(81.3–86.8)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

2,361

85.3

1.0

(83.3–87.2)

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona

1,650

86.9

1.2

(84.5–89.2)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,420

85.3

0.9

(83.5–87.0)

Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine

2,624

88.6

0.8

(87.0–90.1)

Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington

3,394

86.4

0.8

(84.8–87.9)

Port St. Lucie-Fort Pierce, Florida

1,022

82.0

1.7

(78.6–85.3)

Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts

9,381

86.6

0.5

(85.6–87.5)

Provo-Orem, Utah

1,177

91.8

1.0

(89.8–93.7)

Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina

1,025

90.2

1.1

(88.0–92.3)

Rapid City, South Dakota

848

90.3

1.1

(88.1–92.4)

Reno-Sparks, Nevada

1,326

84.7

1.4

(81.9–87.4)

Richmond, Virginia

801

90.1

1.3

(87.5–92.6)

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California

1,877

80.7

1.2

(78.3–83.0)

Rochester, New York

570

85.1

1.9

(81.3–88.8)

Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire

1,590

89.8

0.8

(88.2–91.3)

Rutland, Vermont

657

87.1

1.6

(83.9–90.2)

Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville, California

1,293

86.9

1.1

(84.7–89.0)

St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois

1,749

86.4

1.2

(84.0–88.7)

Salt Lake City, Utah

4,308

87.7

0.6

(86.5–88.8)

San Antonio, Texas

1,123

83.9

1.5

(80.9–86.8)

San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California

1,695

85.6

1.1

(83.4–87.7)

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California

2,354

85.4

1.0

(83.4–87.3)

San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California

912

85.2

1.6

(82.0–88.3)

Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California

1,445

84.5

1.3

(81.9–87.0)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

610

84.8

2.1

(80.6–88.9)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

755

85.5

1.7

(82.1–88.8)

Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

553

82.1

2.0

(78.1–86.0)

Seaford, Delaware

1,239

86.3

1.2

(83.9–88.6)

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington

4,691

88.6

0.6

(87.4–89.7)

Sebring, Florida

520

75.0

3.0

(69.1–80.8)

Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana

679

79.3

1.9

(75.5–83.0)

Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota

1,220

87.3

1.7

(83.9–90.6)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

838

91.7

1.1

(89.5–93.8)

Spokane, Washington

1,214

86.2

1.3

(83.6–88.7)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,052

88.2

1.0

(86.2–90.1)

Tacoma, Washington

1,719

84.2

1.2

(81.8–86.5)

Tallahassee, Florida

2,038

83.9

1.8

(80.3–87.4)

Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida

2,025

82.8

1.2

(80.4–85.1)

Toledo, Ohio

862

83.5

1.8

(79.9–87.0)

Topeka, Kansas

835

83.9

1.5

(80.9–86.8)

Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey

503

87.0

1.9

(83.2–90.7)

Tucson, Arizona

687

84.4

1.9

(80.6–88.1)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,136

79.5

1.1

(77.3–81.6)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

518

81.7

2.4

(76.9–86.4)

Twin Falls, Idaho

536

85.2

2.4

(80.4–89.9)

Tyler, Texas

672

85.7

1.6

(82.5–88.8)

Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina

1,101

85.6

1.8

(82.0–89.1)

Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan

1,798

89.1

0.9

(87.3–90.8)

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia

6,379

88.4

0.9

(86.6–90.1)

Wauchula, Florida

526

76.2

3.2

(69.9–82.4)

West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Boynton Beach, Florida

553

85.0

2.0

(81.0–88.9)

Wichita, Kansas

1,849

85.4

1.2

(83.0–87.7)

Wichita Falls, Texas

824

80.9

2.0

(76.9–84.8)

Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey

2,214

86.6

0.9

(84.8–88.3)


TABLE 2. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95%CI)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,098

87.7

1.1

(85.5–89.8)

Yakima, Washington

739

78.9

1.9

(75.1–82.6)

Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania

1,060

83.8

1.8

(80.2–87.3)

Median

85.2

Range

72.2–92.1

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.

Metropolitan division.


TABLE 3. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Jefferson County, Alabama

602

82.0

1.7

(78.6–85.3)

Mobile County, Alabama

678

78.1

2.1

(73.9–82.2)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

435

84.1

2.4

(79.3–88.8)

Maricopa County, Arizona

1,270

87.0

1.2

(84.6–89.3)

Pima County, Arizona

687

84.4

1.9

(80.6–88.1)

Pinal County, Arizona

380

85.6

2.6

(80.5–90.6)

Benton County, Arkansas

361

92.3

1.5

(89.3–95.2)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

558

85.1

2.2

(80.7–89.4)

Washington County, Arkansas

298

87.9

2.7

(82.6–93.1)

Alameda County, California

755

85.4

1.7

(82.0–88.7)

Contra Costa County, California

632

89.7

1.6

(86.5–92.8)

Los Angeles County, California

2,617

79.4

1.0

(77.4–81.3)

Orange County, California

1,445

84.5

1.3

(81.9–87.0)

Placer County, California

255

88.2

2.2

(83.8–92.5)

Riverside County, California

930

78.3

1.8

(74.7–81.8)

Sacramento County, California

751

85.0

1.6

(81.8–88.1)

San Bernardino County, California

947

82.9

1.6

(79.7–86.0)

San Diego County, California

1,695

85.6

1.1

(83.4–87.7)

San Francisco County, California

385

79.9

2.6

(74.8–84.9)

San Mateo County, California

383

84.5

2.4

(79.7–89.2)

Santa Clara County, California

874

85.4

1.6

(82.2–88.5)

Adams County, Colorado

806

87.4

1.5

(84.4–90.3)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

870

91.2

0.9

(89.4–92.9)

Denver County, Colorado

873

86.6

1.5

(83.6–89.5)

Douglas County, Colorado

578

95.8

0.8

(94.2–97.3)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,031

87.4

1.3

(84.8–89.9)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,164

89.7

1.2

(87.3–92.0)

Larimer County, Colorado

560

92.0

1.6

(88.8–95.1)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

2,153

90.6

1.0

(88.6–92.5)

Hartford County, Connecticut

1,482

87.6

1.1

(85.4–89.7)

Middlesex County, Connecticut

262

89.1

2.2

(84.7–93.4)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,656

88.5

1.0

(86.5–90.4)

Tolland County, Connecticut

252

88.1

2.5

(83.2–93.0)

Kent County, Delaware

1,254

82.8

1.2

(80.4–85.1)

New Castle County, Delaware

1,751

87.6

1.0

(85.6–89.5)

Sussex County, Delaware

1,239

86.3

1.2

(83.9–88.6)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

3,909

89.4

0.7

(88.0–90.7)

Alachua County, Florida

532

90.1

1.7

(86.7–93.4)

Baker County, Florida

508

79.7

3.0

(73.8–85.5)

Bay County, Florida

544

85.2

1.8

(81.6–88.7)

Brevard County, Florida

527

82.0

2.3

(77.4–86.5)

Broward County, Florida

522

86.0

1.9

(82.2–89.7)

Citrus County, Florida

532

79.0

2.2

(74.6–83.3)

Clay County, Florida

485

84.9

1.9

(81.1–88.6)

Collier County, Florida

520

81.9

3.2

(75.6–88.1)

Columbia County, Florida

564

78.2

2.4

(73.4–82.9)

DeSoto County, Florida

502

74.0

3.6

(66.9–81.0)

Duval County, Florida

550

81.5

2.0

(77.5–85.4)

Escambia County, Florida

520

84.4

1.9

(80.6–88.1)

Gadsden County, Florida

510

73.6

3.7

(66.3–80.8)

Gilchrist County, Florida

417

80.1

3.3

(73.6–86.5)

Hardee County, Florida

526

76.2

3.2

(69.9–82.4)

Hernando County, Florida

489

78.7

2.4

(73.9–83.4)

Highlands County, Florida

520

75.0

3.0

(69.1–80.8)

Hillsborough County, Florida

501

85.2

2.1

(81.0–89.3)

Jefferson County, Florida

500

80.4

2.7

(75.1–85.6)

Lake County, Florida

604

83.6

1.7

(80.2–86.9)

Lee County, Florida

518

83.5

2.3

(78.9–88.0)

Leon County, Florida

492

89.3

1.7

(85.9–92.6)

Manatee County, Florida

524

86.2

1.7

(82.8–89.5)

Marion County, Florida

588

76.9

2.5

(72.0–81.8)

Martin County, Florida

520

87.3

1.6

(84.1–90.4)

Miami-Dade County, Florida

505

83.4

2.0

(79.4–87.3)

Monroe County, Florida

505

87.3

1.7

(83.9–90.6)


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Nassau County, Florida

520

83.2

2.5

(78.3–88.1)

Orange County, Florida

1,007

81.5

1.8

(77.9–85.0)

Osceola County, Florida

570

80.4

2.6

(75.3–85.4)

Palm Beach County, Florida

553

85.0

2.0

(81.0–88.9)

Pasco County, Florida

540

81.0

2.2

(76.6–85.3)

Pinellas County, Florida

495

84.6

1.8

(81.0–88.1)

Polk County, Florida

519

80.6

2.3

(76.0–85.1)

St. Johns County, Florida

521

87.7

1.7

(84.3–91.0)

St. Lucie County, Florida

502

79.1

2.3

(74.5–83.6)

Santa Rosa County, Florida

492

83.7

2.0

(79.7–87.6)

Sarasota County, Florida

608

88.2

1.6

(85.0–91.3)

Seminole County, Florida

489

83.7

2.3

(79.1–88.2)

Volusia County, Florida

859

78.9

2.1

(74.7–83.0)

Wakulla County, Florida

536

78.4

3.0

(72.5–84.2)

Cobb County, Georgia

253

85.3

2.7

(80.0–90.5)

DeKalb County, Georgia

341

88.5

1.9

(84.7–92.2)

Fulton County, Georgia

330

93.6

1.3

(91.0–96.1)

Gwinnett County, Georgia

251

89.5

2.2

(85.1–93.8)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

1,480

85.1

1.2

(82.7–87.4)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

2,957

86.1

0.8

(84.5–87.6)

Kauai County, Hawaii

645

83.9

1.9

(80.1–87.6)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,466

86.7

1.3

(84.1–89.2)

Ada County, Idaho

865

88.4

1.3

(85.8–90.9)

Bonneville County, Idaho

522

86.8

1.7

(83.4–90.1)

Canyon County, Idaho

619

79.1

2.1

(74.9–83.2)

Kootenai County, Idaho

568

87.5

1.8

(83.9–91.0)

Nez Perce County, Idaho

381

82.1

2.2

(77.7–86.4)

Twin Falls County, Idaho

430

84.4

2.6

(79.3–89.4)

Cook County, Illinois

2,883

82.9

1.0

(80.9–84.8)

DuPage County, Illinois

256

89.6

2.2

(85.2–93.9)

Allen County, Indiana

585

83.7

2.0

(79.7–87.6)

Lake County, Indiana

997

79.7

2.1

(75.5–83.8)

Marion County, Indiana

1,459

82.1

1.6

(78.9–85.2)

Linn County, Iowa

494

90.1

1.5

(87.1–93.0)

Polk County, Iowa

766

91.5

1.0

(89.5–93.4)

Johnson County, Kansas

1,415

92.5

0.7

(91.1–93.8)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

1,436

85.0

1.3

(82.4–87.5)

Shawnee County, Kansas

623

82.9

1.9

(79.1–86.6)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

605

80.4

2.2

(76.0–84.7)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

409

81.9

2.3

(77.3–86.4)

Caddo Parish, Louisiana

443

78.4

2.3

(73.8–82.9)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

719

80.4

2.1

(76.2–84.5)

Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

594

76.1

2.4

(71.3–80.8)

Orleans Parish, Louisiana

376

82.1

2.3

(77.5–86.6)

St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

371

84.9

2.3

(80.3–89.4)

Androscoggin County, Maine

501

84.5

1.9

(80.7–88.2)

Cumberland County, Maine

1,388

90.0

1.1

(87.8–92.1)

Kennebec County, Maine

653

86.7

1.8

(83.1–90.2)

Penobscot County, Maine

687

83.7

1.7

(80.3–87.0)

Sagadahoc County, Maine

298

85.6

2.3

(81.0–90.1)

York County, Maine

938

87.2

1.4

(84.4–89.9)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

602

89.2

1.5

(86.2–92.1)

Baltimore County, Maryland

1,052

86.2

1.2

(83.8–88.5)

Cecil County, Maryland

267

86.5

2.3

(81.9–91.0)

Charles County, Maryland

349

88.3

1.8

(84.7–91.8)

Frederick County, Maryland

574

89.7

1.6

(86.5–92.8)

Harford County, Maryland

279

83.9

2.8

(78.4–89.3)

Howard County, Maryland

341

88.9

2.3

(84.3–93.4)

Montgomery County, Maryland

1,060

91.2

1.0

(89.2–93.1)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

795

85.9

1.6

(82.7–89.0)

Queen Anne´s County, Maryland

295

91.1

1.6

(87.9–94.2)

Washington County, Maryland

407

84.8

1.9

(81.0–88.5)

Baltimore city, Maryland

533

82.8

2.2

(78.4–87.1)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

2,918

85.0

1.1

(82.8–87.1)


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Essex County, Massachusetts

2,131

87.6

1.3

(85.0–90.1)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

1,593

86.0

1.3

(83.4–88.5)

Hampshire County, Massachusetts

275

93.0

1.7

(89.6–96.3)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

3,015

92.2

0.6

(91.0–93.3)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

860

92.2

1.0

(90.2–94.1)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

687

91.5

1.1

(89.3–93.6)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

1,758

85.8

1.4

(83.0–88.5)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

2,098

87.7

1.1

(85.5–89.8)

Kent County, Michigan

444

89.8

1.7

(86.4–93.1)

Macomb County, Michigan

514

87.2

1.6

(84.0–90.3)

Oakland County, Michigan

936

90.9

1.1

(88.7–93.0)

Wayne County, Michigan

1,909

81.5

1.4

(78.7–84.2)

Anoka County, Minnesota

396

88.7

2.2

(84.3–93.0)

Dakota County, Minnesota

570

91.0

1.6

(87.8–94.1)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

2,049

93.3

0.9

(91.5–95.0)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

919

87.1

2.4

(82.3–91.8)

Washington County, Minnesota

258

91.0

2.3

(86.4–95.5)

DeSoto County, Mississippi

369

82.8

2.5

(77.9–87.7)

Hinds County, Mississippi

339

72.8

3.5

(65.9–79.6)

Jackson County, Missouri

525

86.0

1.9

(82.2–89.7)

St. Louis County, Missouri

605

84.7

2.7

(79.4–89.9)

St. Louis city, Missouri

645

83.7

1.8

(80.1–87.2)

Flathead County, Montana

699

85.4

2.0

(81.4–89.3)

Lewis and Clark County, Montana

529

88.3

1.5

(85.3–91.2)

Yellowstone County, Montana

485

86.0

2.1

(81.8–90.1)

Adams County, Nebraska

478

85.8

1.9

(82.0–89.5)

Dakota County, Nebraska

741

78.0

2.0

(74.0–81.9)

Douglas County, Nebraska

950

88.5

1.3

(85.9–91.0)

Hall County, Nebraska

583

84.0

2.1

(79.8–88.1)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

849

91.6

1.4

(88.8–94.3)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

546

84.2

2.0

(80.2–88.1)

Madison County, Nebraska

467

88.3

1.7

(84.9–91.6)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

579

91.0

1.5

(88.0–93.9)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

732

85.8

1.6

(82.6–88.9)

Seward County, Nebraska

284

89.5

2.2

(85.1–93.8)

Clark County, Nevada

1,266

82.6

1.4

(79.8–85.3)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,306

84.7

1.4

(81.9–87.4)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

502

89.3

1.6

(86.1–92.4)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,401

89.8

1.0

(87.8–91.7)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

628

89.0

1.6

(85.8–92.1)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

1,008

91.1

0.9

(89.3–92.8)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

582

86.9

1.5

(83.9–89.8)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

915

79.9

1.8

(76.3–83.4)

Bergen County, New Jersey

626

87.5

1.6

(84.3–90.6)

Burlington County, New Jersey

568

87.6

1.5

(84.6–90.5)

Camden County, New Jersey

605

83.3

2.0

(79.3–87.2)

Cape May County, New Jersey

519

85.9

1.7

(82.5–89.2)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,019

81.8

1.5

(78.8–84.7)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

527

86.3

2.1

(82.1–90.4)

Hudson County, New Jersey

1,094

80.3

1.5

(77.3–83.2)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

514

93.5

1.2

(91.1–95.8)

Mercer County, New Jersey

503

87.0

1.9

(83.2–90.7)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

632

85.9

1.7

(82.5–89.2)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

562

89.5

1.7

(86.1–92.8)

Morris County, New Jersey

700

91.5

1.2

(89.1–93.8)

Ocean County, New Jersey

536

83.4

1.8

(79.8–86.9)

Passaic County, New Jersey

502

83.2

2.2

(78.8–87.5)

Somerset County, New Jersey

536

90.8

1.5

(87.8–93.7)

Sussex County, New Jersey

502

88.9

1.6

(85.7–92.0)

Union County, New Jersey

522

84.7

1.9

(80.9–88.4)

Warren County, New Jersey

479

88.7

1.6

(85.5–91.8)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,263

83.4

1.4

(80.6–86.1)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

502

76.6

2.8

(71.1–82.0)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

521

87.7

1.6

(84.5–90.8)


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

San Juan County, New Mexico

685

84.7

1.9

(80.9–88.4)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

610

84.8

2.1

(80.6–88.9)

Valencia County, New Mexico

350

76.7

3.1

(70.6–82.7)

Bronx County, New York

434

78.6

2.4

(73.8–83.3)

Erie County, New York

477

84.8

2.2

(80.4–89.1)

Kings County, New York

909

80.7

1.8

(77.1–84.2)

Monroe County, New York

384

85.5

2.2

(81.1–89.8)

Nassau County, New York

478

90.4

1.4

(87.6–93.1)

New York County, New York

1,035

85.2

1.5

(82.2–88.1)

Queens County, New York

797

83.4

1.8

(79.8–86.9)

Suffolk County, New York

592

89.7

1.6

(86.5–92.8)

Westchester County, New York

384

92.4

1.5

(89.4–95.3)

Buncombe County, North Carolina

263

84.7

2.5

(79.8–89.6)

Cabarrus County, North Carolina

307

86.7

2.3

(82.1–91.2)

Catawba County, North Carolina

294

82.4

3.2

(76.1–88.6)

Durham County, North Carolina

618

90.0

1.5

(87.0–92.9)

Gaston County, North Carolina

266

81.2

3.5

(74.3–88.0)

Guilford County, North Carolina

694

86.9

1.5

(83.9–89.8)

Johnston County, North Carolina

274

80.7

3.1

(74.6–86.7)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

605

85.2

1.7

(81.8–88.5)

Orange County, North Carolina

298

89.4

2.1

(85.2–93.5)

Randolph County, North Carolina

395

79.7

2.5

(74.8–84.6)

Union County, North Carolina

346

84.2

3.2

(77.9–90.4)

Wake County, North Carolina

712

92.5

1.0

(90.5–94.4)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

559

87.4

1.5

(84.4–90.3)

Cass County, North Dakota

779

89.8

1.5

(86.8–92.7)

Ward County, North Dakota

466

87.3

1.7

(83.9–90.6)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

720

84.9

1.7

(81.5–88.2)

Franklin County, Ohio

679

84.5

1.7

(81.1–87.8)

Hamilton County, Ohio

725

87.0

1.4

(84.2–89.7)

Lucas County, Ohio

728

83.4

1.7

(80.0–86.7)

Mahoning County, Ohio

728

83.7

1.7

(80.3–87.0)

Montgomery County, Ohio

701

83.9

1.8

(80.3–87.4)

Stark County, Ohio

714

84.6

1.5

(81.6–87.5)

Summit County, Ohio

703

84.1

1.8

(80.5–87.6)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

433

87.1

1.9

(83.3–90.8)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,432

79.8

1.3

(77.2–82.3)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,517

80.9

1.2

(78.5–83.2)

Clackamas County, Oregon

448

85.6

2.1

(81.4–89.7)

Lane County, Oregon

511

83.4

2.1

(79.2–87.5)

Multnomah County, Oregon

816

85.5

1.5

(82.5–88.4)

Washington County, Oregon

584

89.0

1.5

(86.0–91.9)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

1,379

86.8

1.0

(84.8–88.7)

Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

282

83.1

2.5

(78.2–88.0)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

311

82.9

2.4

(78.1–87.6)

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

344

88.1

2.3

(83.5–92.6)

Northampton County, Pennsylvania

260

88.4

2.3

(83.8–92.9)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,399

78.4

1.4

(75.6–81.1)

Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

338

85.5

2.5

(80.6–90.4)

Bristol County, Rhode Island

274

93.9

1.3

(91.3–96.4)

Kent County, Rhode Island

922

85.9

1.4

(83.1–88.6)

Newport County, Rhode Island

477

91.8

1.5

(88.8–94.7)

Providence County, Rhode Island

4,055

85.2

0.7

(83.8–86.5)

Washington County, Rhode Island

735

91.1

1.5

(88.1–94.0)

Aiken County, South Carolina

474

82.6

2.1

(78.4–86.7)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

677

87.6

1.9

(83.8–91.3)

Berkeley County, South Carolina

354

81.3

4.2

(73.0–89.5)

Charleston County, South Carolina

668

86.6

2.1

(82.4–90.7)

Greenville County, South Carolina

492

85.3

2.1

(81.1–89.4)

Horry County, South Carolina

554

84.5

2.0

(80.5–88.4)

Richland County, South Carolina

665

84.4

1.9

(80.6–88.1)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

604

91.1

1.3

(88.5–93.6)

Pennington County, South Dakota

667

90.4

1.2

(88.0–92.7)

Davidson County, Tennessee

418

87.5

1.9

(83.7–91.2)


TABLE 3. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Hamilton County, Tennessee

385

81.2

2.7

(75.9–86.4)

Knox County, Tennessee

370

82.6

2.8

(77.1–88.0)

Shelby County, Tennessee

393

84.4

2.4

(79.6–89.1)

Sullivan County, Tennessee

458

78.6

2.7

(73.3–83.8)

Bexar County, Texas

964

83.4

1.7

(80.0–86.7)

Dallas County, Texas

391

85.1

2.3

(80.5–89.6)

El Paso County, Texas

868

77.2

1.8

(73.6–80.7)

Fort Bend County, Texas

926

90.5

1.2

(88.1–92.8)

Harris County, Texas

1,455

82.1

1.4

(79.3–84.8)

Hidalgo County, Texas

593

75.7

2.2

(71.3–80.0)

Lubbock County, Texas

752

83.0

1.8

(79.4–86.5)

Midland County, Texas

523

84.6

2.0

(80.6–88.5)

Potter County, Texas

336

79.5

2.7

(74.2–84.7)

Randall County, Texas

460

86.0

2.0

(82.0–89.9)

Smith County, Texas

672

85.7

1.6

(82.5–88.8)

Tarrant County, Texas

602

86.7

1.7

(83.3–90.0)

Travis County, Texas

759

85.9

3.8

(78.4–93.3)

Val Verde County, Texas

557

77.5

3.5

(70.6–84.3)

Webb County, Texas

916

78.2

1.5

(75.2–81.1)

Wichita County, Texas

673

80.9

2.2

(76.5–85.2)

Davis County, Utah

875

88.6

1.8

(85.0–92.1)

Salt Lake County, Utah

3,285

87.3

0.7

(85.9–88.6)

Summit County, Utah

453

94.4

1.2

(92.0–96.7)

Tooele County, Utah

570

88.9

1.5

(85.9–91.8)

Utah County, Utah

1,114

92.0

1.0

(90.0–93.9)

Weber County, Utah

774

85.6

1.7

(82.2–88.9)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,428

92.3

0.9

(90.5–94.0)

Franklin County, Vermont

483

87.5

1.6

(84.3–90.6)

Orange County, Vermont

358

89.3

1.8

(85.7–92.8)

Rutland County, Vermont

657

87.1

1.6

(83.9–90.2)

Washington County, Vermont

669

90.5

1.2

(88.1–92.8)

Windsor County, Vermont

681

88.6

1.3

(86.0–91.1)

Benton County, Washington

393

86.3

2.0

(82.3–90.2)

Clark County, Washington

1,090

86.0

1.6

(82.8–89.1)

Franklin County, Washington

254

78.8

4.2

(70.5–87.0)

King County, Washington

3,039

89.5

0.7

(88.1–90.8)

Kitsap County, Washington

920

88.8

1.3

(86.2–91.3)

Pierce County, Washington

1,719

85.3

1.0

(83.3–87.2)

Snohomish County, Washington

1,652

88.0

0.9

(86.2–89.7)

Spokane County, Washington

1,214

86.2

1.3

(83.6–88.7)

Thurston County, Washington

775

89.3

1.2

(86.9–91.6)

Yakima County, Washington

739

78.9

1.9

(75.1–82.6)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

489

77.7

2.5

(72.8–82.6)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

1,216

82.3

2.0

(78.3–86.2)

Laramie County, Wyoming

914

85.1

1.5

(82.1–88.0)

Natrona County, Wyoming

767

85.6

1.6

(82.4–88.7)

Median

85.6

Range

72.895.8

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.


TABLE 4. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health–care coverage,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

7,636

83.8

0.7

(82.4–85.2)

Alaska

1,947

82.4

1.5

(79.5–85.3)

Arizona

5,738

86.7

0.9

(84.9–88.4)

Arkansas

4,017

78.7

1.3

(76.2–81.2)

California

17,767

82.2

0.5

(81.2–83.1)

Colorado

11,625

83.6

0.7

(82.3–84.9)

Connecticut

6,762

90.2

0.7

(88.8–91.5)

Delaware

4,237

90.0

0.9

(88.2–91.8)

District of Columbia

3,972

93.0

0.7

(91.6–94.3)

Florida

35,008

83.0

0.6

(81.9–84.1)

Georgia

5,767

83.7

0.8

(82.2–85.2)

Hawaii

6,544

93.2

0.6

(92.1–94.4)

Idaho

6,989

80.9

0.8

(79.4–82.4)

Illinois

5,193

86.9

0.9

(85.2–88.6)

Indiana

10,178

85.0

0.6

(83.7–86.2)

Iowa

6,080

89.6

0.7

(88.3–90.9)

Kansas

8,554

87.5

0.6

(86.3–88.6)

Kentucky

8,039

83.1

0.8

(81.5–84.7)

Louisiana

7,024

79.2

0.8

(77.5–80.8)

Maine

8,110

88.0

0.6

(86.9–89.2)

Maryland

9,168

89.1

0.7

(87.8–90.4)

Massachusetts

16,285

95.7

0.3

(95.2–96.3)

Michigan

8,836

86.1

0.6

(84.9–87.3)

Minnesota

8,948

91.0

0.7

(89.6–92.3)

Mississippi

8,071

78.4

0.8

(76.8–80.1)

Missouri

5,410

85.0

1.0

(83.0–87.0)

Montana

7,277

81.6

0.9

(79.7–83.4)

Nebraska

16,349

86.3

0.8

(84.8–87.8)

Nevada

3,904

80.3

1.3

(77.7–82.9)

New Hampshire

6,037

88.7

0.6

(87.5–90.0)

New Jersey

12,406

88.5

0.5

(87.5–89.5)

New Mexico

6,969

80.9

0.9

(79.2–82.6)

New York

8,914

88.6

0.5

(87.6–89.7)

North Carolina

12,106

81.0

0.7

(79.6–82.4)

North Dakota

4,743

88.9

0.8

(87.3–90.6)

Ohio

9,826

87.2

0.6

(86.0–88.4)

Oklahoma

7,724

80.8

0.7

(79.5–82.1)

Oregon

5,051

83.5

1.0

(81.6–85.4)

Pennsylvania

11,203

88.5

0.5

(87.5–89.4)

Rhode Island

6,589

87.7

0.8

(86.2–89.3)

South Carolina

9,390

81.2

0.9

(79.4–83.1)

South Dakota

6,702

89.4

0.7

(88.1–90.7)

Tennessee

5,761

83.5

0.9

(81.6–85.3)

Texas

18,018

76.9

0.7

(75.5–78.3)

Utah

10,134

84.1

0.7

(82.8–85.4)

Vermont

6,779

91.6

0.6

(90.5–92.7)

Virginia

5,376

87.8

0.8

(86.2–89.4)

Washington

19,579

84.9

0.5

(84.0–85.8)

West Virginia

4,392

82.5

0.9

(80.7–84.3)

Wisconsin

4,765

89.3

0.8

(87.7–90.9)

Wyoming

5,824

83.5

0.8

(81.9–85.2)

Guam

779

77.8

2.0

(74.0–81.7)

Puerto Rico

3,541

92.1

0.7

(90.7–93.5)

Virgin Islands

1,815

69.4

1.6

(66.3–72.5)

Median

85.0

Range

69.4–95.7

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).


TABLE 5. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Akron, Ohio

810

85.0

2.0

(81.0–88.9)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

2,186

85.2

1.5

(82.2–88.1)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

1,090

90.5

1.4

(87.7–93.2)

Amarillo, Texas

827

82.7

2.0

(78.7–86.6)

Arcadia, Florida

502

64.7

4.6

(55.6–73.7)

Asheville, North Carolina

547

81.9

2.4

(77.1–86.6)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

2,342

84.7

1.4

(81.9–87.4)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

921

87.6

1.6

(84.4–90.7)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

871

84.6

1.9

(80.8–88.3)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

652

88.6

2.0

(84.6–92.5)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

975

88.0

2.0

(84.0–91.9)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

3,336

89.6

1.0

(87.6–91.5)

Bangor, Maine

687

89.8

1.5

(86.8–92.7)

Barre, Vermont

671

92.0

1.8

(88.4–95.5)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,201

83.9

1.6

(80.7–87.0)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland

1,640

89.8

1.4

(87.0–92.5)

Billings, Montana

534

85.8

2.3

(81.2–90.3)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

1,197

82.2

1.9

(78.4–85.9)

Bismarck, North Dakota

769

92.5

1.3

(89.9–95.0)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

1,658

80.8

1.5

(77.8–83.7)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts

3,307

95.1

0.7

(93.7–96.4)

Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington

922

88.4

1.8

(84.8–91.9)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

2,180

91.4

1.1

(89.2–93.5)

Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Tonawanda, New York

609

93.0

1.7

(89.6–96.3)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

1,994

94.3

0.8

(92.7–95.8)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts

3,023

97.0

0.5

(96.0–97.9)

Camden, New Jersey

1,697

91.9

1.1

(89.7–94.0)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

746

84.4

2.5

(79.5–89.3)

Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Florida

515

76.9

4.3

(68.4–85.3)

Casper, Wyoming

766

81.8

2.2

(77.4–86.1)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

557

92.3

1.6

(89.1–95.4)

Charleston, West Virginia

769

84.3

2.2

(79.9–88.6)

Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina

1,150

84.0

2.2

(79.6–88.3)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

1,710

81.2

1.7

(77.8–84.5)

Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia

536

80.4

3.1

(74.3–86.4)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

912

85.9

1.7

(82.5–89.2)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

5,009

85.4

1.0

(83.4–87.3)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

1,789

86.1

1.6

(82.9–89.2)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

1,097

89.2

1.5

(86.2–92.1)

Coeur d´Alene, Idaho

570

82.2

2.8

(76.7–87.6)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,162

85.3

1.7

(81.9–88.6)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,132

80.9

2.3

(76.3–85.4)

Columbus, Ohio

1,381

88.9

1.5

(85.9–91.8)

Concord, New Hampshire

640

88.2

2.2

(83.8–92.5)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas

719

78.3

2.7

(73.0–83.5)

Dayton, Ohio

852

89.1

1.8

(85.5–92.6)

Del Rio, Texas

556

74.7

3.4

(68.0–81.3)

Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, Florida

861

82.1

2.3

(77.5–86.6)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

4,828

86.9

0.8

(85.3–88.4)

Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa

1,003

91.5

1.2

(89.1–93.8)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan

1,909

82.0

1.8

(78.4–85.5)

Dover, Delaware

1,251

90.5

1.6

(87.3–93.6)

Durham, North Carolina

1,034

86.1

1.9

(82.3–89.8)

Edison, New Jersey

2,263

90.7

1.0

(88.7–92.6)

El Paso, Texas

869

62.5

2.4

(57.7–67.2)

Eugene-Springfield, Oregon

510

79.1

3.4

(72.4–85.7)

Evansville, Indiana-Kentucky

535

89.8

1.9

(86.0–93.5)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

831

92.7

1.7

(89.3–96.0)

Farmington, New Mexico

684

74.5

2.7

(69.2–79.7)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

698

79.5

3.1

(73.4–85.5)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

560

87.7

2.8

(82.2–93.1)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

719

87.5

1.7

(84.1–90.8)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas

735

80.3

2.6

(75.2–85.3)


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Gainesville, Florida

953

84.8

2.7

(79.5–90.0)

Grand Island, Nebraska

859

85.8

2.0

(81.8–89.7)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

619

89.8

1.7

(86.4–93.1)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

1,157

86.4

1.7

(83.0–89.7)

Greenville, South Carolina

779

82.9

3.1

(76.8–88.9)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

644

84.0

2.6

(78.9–89.0)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

2,019

90.0

1.3

(87.4–92.5)

Hastings, Nebraska

589

91.3

1.8

(87.7–94.8)

Helena, Montana

642

89.3

2.0

(85.3–93.2)

Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina

597

78.1

2.6

(73.0–83.1)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,479

91.4

1.2

(89.0–93.7)

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina

803

87.4

2.0

(83.4–91.3)

Homosassa Springs, Florida

535

79.7

2.8

(74.2–85.1)

Honolulu, Hawaii

2,958

93.9

0.8

(92.3–95.4)

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas

2,735

75.9

1.6

(72.7–79.0)

Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio

657

84.2

2.1

(80.0–88.3)

Idaho Falls, Idaho

665

83.7

2.1

(79.5–87.8)

Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana

2,252

86.5

1.3

(83.9–89.0)

Jackson, Mississippi

759

84.1

2.0

(80.1–88.0)

Jacksonville, Florida

2,583

85.4

1.8

(81.8–88.9)

Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii

1,462

92.5

1.1

(90.3–94.6)

Kalispell, Montana

698

81.1

2.0

(77.1–85.0)

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas

3,378

87.5

1.0

(85.5–89.4)

Kapaa, Hawaii

645

90.7

2.0

(86.7–94.6)

Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington

645

82.9

2.1

(78.7–87.0)

Key West-Marathon, Florida

503

77.9

3.2

(71.6–84.1)

Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia

655

83.2

3.5

(76.3–90.0)

Knoxville, Tennessee

529

83.8

2.6

(78.7–88.8)

Lake City, Florida

565

77.6

2.9

(71.9–83.2)

Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida

522

76.2

3.0

(70.3–82.0)

Laredo, Texas

924

51.2

2.2

(46.8–55.5)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

503

72.9

3.5

(66.0–79.7)

Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada

1,270

80.3

1.8

(76.7–83.8)

Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont

1,551

87.0

1.4

(84.2–89.7)

Lewiston, Idaho-Washington

602

85.9

2.5

(81.0–90.8)

Lewiston-Auburn, Maine

500

88.8

2.0

(84.8–92.7)

Lincoln, Nebraska

1,132

86.9

2.1

(82.7–91.0)

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas

822

86.6

2.2

(82.2–90.9)

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California

2,614

77.3

1.2

(74.9–79.6)

Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana

908

86.3

1.8

(82.7–89.8)

Lubbock, Texas

776

77.7

2.8

(72.2–83.1)

Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire

1,421

90.1

1.3

(87.5–92.6)

McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas

595

45.7

2.8

(40.2–51.1)

Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas

1,155

82.4

2.8

(76.9–87.8)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida

1,029

76.5

2.2

(72.1–80.8)

Midland, Texas

524

84.5

2.4

(79.7–89.2)

Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin

1,527

90.3

1.6

(87.1–93.4)

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin

4,859

91.0

1.1

(88.8–93.1)

Minot, North Dakota

553

91.5

1.5

(88.5–94.4)

Mobile, Alabama

675

76.8

2.9

(71.1–82.4)

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

555

77.0

3.0

(71.1–82.8)

Naples-Marco Island, Florida

519

80.7

3.6

(73.6–87.7)

Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, Tennessee

830

86.0

2.2

(81.6–90.3)

Nassau-Suffolk, New York

1,071

90.6

1.4

(87.8–93.3)

Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania

3,317

85.9

1.2

(83.5–88.2)

New Haven-Milford, Connecticut

1,669

90.2

1.3

(87.6–92.7)

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana

1,537

79.7

1.8

(76.1–83.2)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey

6,177

85.6

0.8

(84.0–87.1)

Norfolk, Nebraska

675

90.1

1.8

(86.5–93.6)

North Platte, Nebraska

North Port-Bradenton-Sarasota, Florida

577

1,134

90.3

81.9

1.9

2.3

(86.5–94.0)

(77.3–86.4)

Ocala, Florida

589

80.3

2.8

(74.8–85.7)

Ocean City, New Jersey

519

88.2

2.4

(83.4–92.9)


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Ogden-Clearfield, Utah

1,696

86.8

1.6

(83.6–89.9)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,473

79.9

1.2

(77.5–82.2)

Olympia, Washington

773

85.7

2.2

(81.3–90.0)

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa

2,350

85.6

1.4

(82.8–88.3)

Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida

2,667

81.5

1.3

(78.9–84.0)

Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Florida

527

82.4

3.1

(76.3–88.4)

Panama City-Lynn Haven, Florida

543

84.1

2.4

(79.3–88.8)

Peabody, Massachusetts

2,134

93.7

1.5

(90.7–96.6)

Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Florida

1,014

82.2

2.1

(78.0–86.3)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

2,365

87.1

1.3

(84.5–89.6)

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona

1,687

87.2

1.4

(84.4–89.9)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,417

89.1

1.1

(86.9–91.2)

Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine

2,626

90.6

0.9

(88.8–92.3)

Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington

3,395

86.1

1.2

(83.7–88.4)

Port St. Lucie-Fort Pierce, Florida

1,023

80.3

2.4

(75.5–85.0)

Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts

9,517

89.7

0.7

(88.3–91.0)

Provo-Orem, Utah

1,173

85.5

1.8

(81.9–89.0)

Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina

1,024

86.1

1.7

(82.7–89.4)

Rapid City, South Dakota

846

88.2

1.6

(85.0–91.3)

Reno-Sparks, Nevada

1,326

82.4

1.5

(79.4–85.3)

Richmond, Virginia

800

87.2

2.2

(82.8–91.5)

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California

1,879

76.6

1.5

(73.6–79.5)

Rochester, New York

566

90.9

2.4

(86.1–95.6)

Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire

1,606

90.8

1.0

(88.8–92.7)

Rutland, Vermont

659

88.3

2.2

(83.9–92.6)

Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville, California

1,293

87.2

1.8

(83.6–90.7)

St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois

1,745

86.4

1.8

(82.8–89.9)

Salt Lake City, Utah

4,299

83.1

0.9

(81.3–84.8)

San Antonio, Texas

1,129

82.8

2.0

(78.8–86.7)

San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California

1,695

82.3

1.5

(79.3–85.2)

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California

2,357

90.7

0.9

(88.9–92.4)

San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California

911

89.4

1.6

(86.2–92.5)

Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California

1,446

84.3

1.5

(81.3–87.2)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

609

79.3

2.6

(74.2–84.3)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

759

88.5

1.7

(85.1–91.8)

Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

553

87.7

2.3

(83.1–92.2)

Seaford, Delaware

1,238

87.9

1.8

(84.3–91.4)

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington

4,691

85.9

0.9

(84.1–87.6)

Sebring, Florida

520

79.8

3.0

(73.9–85.6)

Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana

681

77.6

2.8

(72.1–83.0)

Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota

1,220

86.4

2.7

(81.1–91.6)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

838

93.4

1.3

(90.8–95.9)

Spokane, Washington

1,212

86.0

1.7

(82.6–89.3)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,050

94.0

1.4

(91.2–96.7)

Tacoma, Washington

1,719

87.7

1.2

(85.3–90.0)

Tallahassee, Florida

2,046

84.8

2.1

(80.6–88.9)

Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida

2,033

85.2

1.6

(82.0–88.3)

Toledo, Ohio

863

87.8

1.6

(84.6–90.9)

Topeka, Kansas

835

87.9

1.8

(84.3–91.4)

Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey

503

93.8

1.6

(90.6–96.9)

Tucson, Arizona

698

86.6

2.5

(81.7–91.5)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,137

80.2

1.3

(77.6–82.7)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

516

79.8

3.1

(73.7–85.8)

Twin Falls, Idaho

539

77.3

3.2

(71.0–83.5)

Tyler, Texas

673

76.3

3.3

(69.8–82.7)

Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina

1,103

85.7

2.3

(81.1–90.2)

Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan

1,797

88.4

1.4

(85.6–91.1)

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia

6,438

91.3

0.9

(89.5–93.0)

Wauchula, Florida

530

67.0

4.0

(59.1–74.8)

West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Boynton Beach, Florida

551

89.5

2.2

(85.1–93.8)

Wichita, Kansas

1,848

87.8

1.3

(85.2–90.3)

Wichita Falls, Texas

828

77.1

2.6

(72.0–82.1)

Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey

2,214

90.2

1.1

(88.0–92.3)


TABLE 5. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health-care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,098

95.9

0.7

(94.5–97.2)

Yakima, Washington

737

78.1

2.4

(73.3–82.8)

Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania

1,062

87.1

2.2

(82.7–91.4)

Median

85.9

Range

45.7-97.0

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).

Metropolitan division.


TABLE6. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Jefferson County, Alabama

601

79.3

2.7

(74.0–84.5)

Mobile County, Alabama

675

76.8

2.9

(71.1–82.4)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

433

79.7

3.3

(73.2–86.1)

Maricopa County, Arizona

1,300

86.8

1.5

(83.8–89.7)

Pima County, Arizona

698

86.6

2.5

(81.7–91.5)

Pinal County, Arizona

387

91.8

2.0

(87.8–95.7)

Benton County, Arkansas

360

88.1

2.9

(82.4–93.7)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

559

87.8

2.7

(82.5–93.0)

Washington County, Arkansas

297

81.5

3.9

(73.8–89.1)

Alameda County, California

757

90.1

1.5

(87.1–93.0)

Contra Costa County, California

631

89.8

1.7

(86.4–93.1)

Los Angeles County, California

2,614

77.3

1.2

(74.9–79.6)

Orange County, California

1,446

84.3

1.5

(81.3–87.2)

Placer County, California

255

88.7

3.0

(82.8–94.5)

Riverside County, California

932

77.7

2.1

(73.5–81.8)

Sacramento County, California

751

90.0

1.7

(86.6–93.3)

San Bernardino County, California

947

75.9

2.2

(71.5–80.2)

San Diego County, California

1,695

82.3

1.5

(79.3–85.2)

San Francisco County, California

385

95.9

1.2

(93.5–98.2)

San Mateo County, California

385

90.2

2.4

(85.4–94.9)

Santa Clara County, California

873

89.5

1.6

(86.3–92.6)

Adams County, Colorado

808

82.4

2.1

(78.2–86.5)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

872

88.2

1.8

(84.6–91.7)

Denver County, Colorado

875

84.6

2.1

(80.4–88.7)

Douglas County, Colorado

578

93.0

1.6

(89.8–96.1)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,029

84.7

1.8

(81.1–88.2)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,167

87.5

1.8

(83.9–91.0)

Larimer County, Colorado

560

87.7

2.8

(82.2–93.1)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

2,180

91.4

1.1

(89.2–93.5)

Hartford County, Connecticut

1,502

89.9

1.4

(87.1–92.6)

Middlesex County, Connecticut

262

92.1

2.6

(87.0–97.1)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,669

90.2

1.3

(87.6–92.7)

Tolland County, Connecticut

255

91.5

2.8

(86.0–96.9)

Kent County, Delaware

1,251

90.5

1.6

(87.3–93.6)

New Castle County, Delaware

1,748

90.6

1.2

(88.2–92.9)

Sussex County, Delaware

1,238

87.9

1.8

(84.3–91.4)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

3,972

92.7

0.8

(91.1–94.2)

Alachua County, Florida

536

85.3

2.8

(79.8–90.7)

Baker County, Florida

508

82.2

3.3

(75.7–88.6)

Bay County, Florida

543

84.1

2.4

(79.3–88.8)

Brevard County, Florida

527

82.4

3.1

(76.3–88.4)

Broward County, Florida

524

78.7

2.8

(73.2–84.1)

Citrus County, Florida

535

79.7

2.8

(74.2–85.1)

Clay County, Florida

486

83.6

2.7

(78.3–88.8)

Collier County, Florida

519

80.7

3.6

(73.6–87.7)

Columbia County, Florida

565

77.6

2.9

(71.9–83.2)

DeSoto County, Florida

502

64.7

4.6

(55.6–73.7)

Duval County, Florida

547

87.7

2.1

(83.5–91.8)

Escambia County, Florida

520

80.3

3.1

(74.2–86.3)

Gadsden County, Florida

510

79.8

2.7

(74.5–85.0)

Gilchrist County, Florida

417

NA

NA

NA

Hardee County, Florida

530

67.0

4.0

(59.1–74.8)

Hernando County, Florida

490

84.9

2.8

(79.4–90.3)

Highlands County, Florida

520

79.8

3.0

(73.9–85.6)

Hillsborough County, Florida

506

84.5

2.5

(79.6–89.4)

Jefferson County, Florida

502

78.2

3.6

(71.1–85.2)

Lake County, Florida

606

88.1

2.4

(83.3–92.8)

Lee County, Florida

515

76.9

4.3

(68.4–85.3)

Leon County, Florida

498

88.4

2.4

(83.6–93.1)

Manatee County, Florida

525

82.7

3.5

(75.8–89.5)

Marion County, Florida

589

80.3

2.8

(74.8–85.7)

Martin County, Florida

519

87.2

2.4

(82.4–91.9)

Miami-Dade County, Florida

505

77.2

2.9

(71.5–82.8)


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Monroe County, Florida

503

77.9

3.2

(71.6–84.1)

Nassau County, Florida

521

NA

NA

NA

Orange County, Florida

1,002

82.2

1.8

(78.6–85.7)

Osceola County, Florida

570

75.9

3.0

(70.0–81.7)

Palm Beach County, Florida

551

89.5

2.2

(85.1–93.8)

Pasco County, Florida

540

86.2

3.1

(80.1–92.2)

Pinellas County, Florida

497

86.8

2.6

(81.7–91.8)

Polk County, Florida

522

76.2

3.0

(70.3–82.0)

St. Johns County, Florida

521

92.0

1.7

(88.6–95.3)

St. Lucie County, Florida

504

78.3

3.0

(72.4–84.1)

Santa Rosa County, Florida

494

85.1

2.3

(80.5–89.6)

Sarasota County, Florida

609

81.4

2.8

(75.9–86.8)

Seminole County, Florida

489

81.1

2.6

(76.0–86.1)

Volusia County, Florida

861

82.1

2.3

(77.5–86.6)

Wakulla County, Florida

536

81.4

3.3

(74.9–87.8)

Cobb County, Georgia

253

95.6

1.3

(93.0–98.1)

DeKalb County, Georgia

342

83.2

3.1

(77.1–89.2)

Fulton County, Georgia

328

87.6

3.0

(81.7–93.4)

Gwinnett County, Georgia

251

88.1

3.4

(81.4–94.7)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

1,479

91.4

1.2

(89.0–93.7)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

2,958

93.9

0.8

(92.3–95.4)

Kauai County, Hawaii

645

90.7

2.0

(86.7–94.6)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,462

92.5

1.1

(90.3–94.6)

Ada County, Idaho

861

85.0

2.0

(81.0–88.9)

Bonneville County, Idaho

522

85.1

2.3

(80.5–89.6)

Canyon County, Idaho

619

73.7

2.7

(68.4–78.9)

Kootenai County, Idaho

570

82.2

2.8

(76.7–87.6)

Nez Perce County, Idaho

381

85.6

2.8

(80.1–91.0)

Twin Falls County, Idaho

434

80.5

3.1

(74.4–86.5)

Cook County, Illinois

2,882

83.6

1.3

(81.0–86.1)

DuPage County, Illinois

256

91.3

2.5

(86.4–96.2)

Allen County, Indiana

585

86.1

2.0

(82.1–90.0)

Lake County, Indiana

999

81.7

2.5

(76.8–86.6)

Marion County, Indiana

1,463

83.3

1.8

(79.7–86.8)

Linn County, Iowa

494

92.0

1.8

(88.4–95.5)

Polk County, Iowa

765

91.5

1.4

(88.7–94.2)

Johnson County, Kansas

1,416

93.0

1.1

(90.8–95.1)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

1,435

87.6

1.4

(84.8–90.3)

Shawnee County, Kansas

624

88.0

2.2

(83.6–92.3)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

607

72.9

3.1

(66.8–78.9)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

410

84.4

2.6

(79.3–89.4)

Caddo Parish, Louisiana

446

79.0

2.9

(73.3–84.6)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

722

81.9

2.3

(77.3–86.4)

Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

595

80.3

2.3

(75.7–84.8)

Orleans Parish, Louisiana

377

82.3

2.9

(76.6–87.9)

St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

372

82.7

3.8

(75.2–90.1)

Androscoggin County, Maine

500

88.8

2.0

(84.8–92.7)

Cumberland County, Maine

1,385

91.1

1.5

(88.1–94.0)

Kennebec County, Maine

652

88.6

2.0

(84.6–92.5)

Penobscot County, Maine

687

89.8

1.5

(86.8–92.7)

Sagadahoc County, Maine

299

88.3

2.5

(83.4–93.2)

York County, Maine

942

90.1

1.4

(87.3–92.8)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

601

91.4

1.9

(87.6–95.1)

Baltimore County, Maryland

1,052

91.2

1.4

(88.4–93.9)

Cecil County, Maryland

270

90.1

2.4

(85.3–94.8)

Charles County, Maryland

349

92.8

1.8

(89.2–96.3)

Frederick County, Maryland

577

91.0

1.9

(87.2–94.7)

Harford County, Maryland

280

93.5

1.8

(89.9–97.0)

Howard County, Maryland

341

95.1

1.7

(91.7–98.4)

Montgomery County, Maryland

1,063

89.4

1.7

(86.0–92.7)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

790

87.8

1.9

(84.0–91.5)

Queen Anne´s County, Maryland

294

95.6

1.7

(92.2–98.9)

Washington County, Maryland

407

83.4

3.0

(77.5–89.2)


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Baltimore city, Maryland

533

84.2

2.4

(79.4–88.9)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

2,928

94.7

1.1

(92.5–96.8)

Essex County, Massachusetts

2,134

94.0

1.4

(91.2–96.7)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

1,591

92.5

2.0

(88.5–96.4)

Hampshire County, Massachusetts

275

95.6

2.5

(90.3–100.0

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

3,023

96.8

0.7

(95.4–98.1)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

860

97.2

0.7

(95.8–98.5)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

687

95.8

1.6

(92.6–98.9)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

1,760

93.8

1.2

(91.4–96.1)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

2,098

95.9

0.7

(94.5–97.2)

Kent County, Michigan

444

90.6

2.1

(86.4–94.7)

Macomb County, Michigan

515

89.9

2.2

(85.5–94.2)

Oakland County, Michigan

933

88.5

1.7

(85.1–91.8)

Wayne County, Michigan

1,909

82.0

1.8

(78.4–85.5)

Anoka County, Minnesota

395

93.5

1.7

(90.1–96.8)

Dakota County, Minnesota

571

95.7

1.2

(93.3–98.0)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

2,053

91.9

1.5

(88.9–94.8)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

917

92.3

2.2

(87.9–96.6)

Washington County, Minnesota

258

95.4

1.9

(91.6–99.1)

DeSoto County, Mississippi

370

83.3

3.3

(76.8–89.7)

Hinds County, Mississippi

338

79.2

3.2

(72.9–85.4)

Jackson County, Missouri

524

86.3

2.1

(82.1–90.4)

St. Louis County, Missouri

601

88.7

2.3

(84.1–93.2)

St. Louis city, Missouri

647

78.0

4.1

(69.9–86.0)

Flathead County, Montana

698

81.1

2.0

(77.1–85.0)

Lewis and Clark County, Montana

533

90.0

1.9

(86.2–93.7)

Yellowstone County, Montana

483

86.0

2.3

(81.4–90.5)

Adams County, Nebraska

480

91.1

1.9

(87.3–94.8)

Dakota County, Nebraska

741

77.5

2.3

(72.9–82.0)

Douglas County, Nebraska

951

86.7

1.9

(82.9–90.4)

Hall County, Nebraska

585

83.0

2.6

(77.9–88.0)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

847

86.4

2.3

(81.8–90.9)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

545

90.2

2.0

(86.2–94.1)

Madison County, Nebraska

467

90.1

2.3

(85.5–94.6)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

575

85.6

2.8

(80.1–91.0)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

736

88.5

1.8

(84.9–92.0)

Seward County, Nebraska

285

93.5

2.1

(89.3–97.6)

Clark County, Nevada

1,270

80.3

1.8

(76.7–83.8)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,306

82.6

1.5

(79.6–85.5)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

516

85.1

2.5

(80.2–90.0)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,421

90.1

1.3

(87.5–92.6)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

640

88.2

2.2

(83.8–92.5)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

1,020

92.4

1.1

(90.2–94.5)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

586

87.9

1.9

(84.1–91.6)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

921

87.6

1.6

(84.4–90.7)

Bergen County, New Jersey

625

90.2

1.8

(86.6–93.7)

Burlington County, New Jersey

568

96.8

0.7

(95.4–98.1)

Camden County, New Jersey

603

88.8

2.3

(84.2–93.3)

Cape May County, New Jersey

519

88.2

2.4

(83.4–92.9)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,022

80.9

1.9

(77.1–84.6)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

526

91.1

2.2

(86.7–95.4)

Hudson County, New Jersey

1,098

80.5

1.7

(77.1–83.8)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

514

96.0

1.1

(93.8–98.1)

Mercer County, New Jersey

503

93.8

1.6

(90.6–96.9)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

632

89.5

1.8

(85.9–93.0)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

563

93.5

1.7

(90.1–96.8)

Morris County, New Jersey

699

94.4

1.3

(91.8–96.9)

Ocean County, New Jersey

532

89.6

1.9

(85.8–93.3)

Passaic County, New Jersey

502

79.8

2.8

(74.3–85.2)

Somerset County, New Jersey

536

91.4

1.6

(88.2–94.5)

Sussex County, New Jersey

500

93.3

1.5

(90.3–96.2)

Union County, New Jersey

522

84.8

2.4

(80.0–89.5)

Warren County, New Jersey

481

93.8

1.4

(91.0–96.5)


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,262

86.4

1.8

(82.8–89.9)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

503

72.9

3.5

(66.0–79.7)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

517

85.4

2.6

(80.3–90.4)

San Juan County, New Mexico

684

74.5

2.7

(69.2–79.7)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

609

79.3

2.6

(74.2–84.3)

Valencia County, New Mexico

348

77.6

3.6

(70.5–84.6)

Bronx County, New York

435

81.2

3.0

(75.3–87.0)

Erie County, New York

479

93.7

1.6

(90.5–96.8)

Kings County, New York

907

85.0

1.8

(81.4–88.5)

Monroe County, New York

381

92.2

2.7

(86.9–97.4)

Nassau County, New York

477

92.9

1.6

(89.7–96.0)

New York County, New York

1,034

87.5

1.8

(83.9–91.0)

Queens County, New York

792

87.3

2.0

(83.3–91.2)

Suffolk County, New York

594

89.5

2.0

(85.5–93.4)

Westchester County, New York

384

93.0

1.8

(89.4–96.5)

Buncombe County, North Carolina

263

79.3

3.5

(72.4–86.1)

Cabarrus County, North Carolina

307

82.8

3.2

(76.5–89.0)

Catawba County, North Carolina

294

79.0

3.5

(72.1–85.8)

Durham County, North Carolina

620

86.0

2.4

(81.2–90.7)

Gaston County, North Carolina

267

74.6

4.5

(65.7–83.4)

Guilford County, North Carolina

692

87.4

2.1

(83.2–91.5)

Johnston County, North Carolina

275

80.4

3.4

(73.7–87.0)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

609

84.6

2.3

(80.0–89.1)

Orange County, North Carolina

299

87.9

2.7

(82.6–93.1)

Randolph County, North Carolina

396

81.4

2.9

(75.7–87.0)

Union County, North Carolina

349

81.9

3.4

(75.2–88.5)

Wake County, North Carolina

710

87.3

2.2

(82.9–91.6)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

559

92.7

1.6

(89.5–95.8)

Cass County, North Dakota

777

91.3

2.3

(86.7–95.8)

Ward County, North Dakota

462

91.5

1.7

(88.1–94.8)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

718

86.6

2.1

(82.4–90.7)

Franklin County, Ohio

677

89.9

2.1

(85.7–94.0)

Hamilton County, Ohio

722

89.7

1.7

(86.3–93.0)

Lucas County, Ohio

729

84.9

2.1

(80.7–89.0)

Mahoning County, Ohio

730

90.1

1.7

(86.7–93.4)

Montgomery County, Ohio

703

88.1

1.9

(84.3–91.8)

Stark County, Ohio

715

84.9

2.5

(80.0–89.8)

Summit County, Ohio

705

86.4

2.1

(82.2–90.5)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

433

87.9

2.3

(83.3–92.4)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,438

76.0

1.7

(72.6–79.3)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,516

79.8

1.4

(77.0–82.5)

Clackamas County, Oregon

450

88.3

2.4

(83.5–93.0)

Lane County, Oregon

510

79.1

3.4

(72.4–85.7)

Multnomah County, Oregon

817

87.2

2.2

(82.8–91.5)

Washington County, Oregon

583

86.6

2.5

(81.7–91.5)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

1,379

90.7

1.3

(88.1–93.2)

Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

283

90.5

2.1

(86.3–94.6)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

312

85.6

3.3

(79.1–92.0)

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

347

87.5

3.0

(81.6–93.3)

Northampton County, Pennsylvania

260

88.7

3.9

(81.0–96.3)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,401

84.5

1.6

(81.3–87.6)

Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

337

89.0

2.7

(83.7–94.2)

Bristol County, Rhode Island

278

92.9

2.0

(88.9–96.8)

Kent County, Rhode Island

939

89.9

1.6

(86.7–93.0)

Newport County, Rhode Island

487

92.7

2.4

(87.9–97.4)

Providence County, Rhode Island

4,138

85.3

1.1

(83.1–87.4)

Washington County, Rhode Island

747

90.5

2.0

(86.5–94.4)

Aiken County, South Carolina

473

87.9

2.2

(83.5–92.2)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

681

89.9

2.0

(85.9–93.8)

Berkeley County, South Carolina

358

NA

NA

NA

Charleston County, South Carolina

668

84.8

2.7

(79.5–90.0)

Greenville County, South Carolina

495

87.2

2.8

(81.7–92.6)

Horry County, South Carolina

555

77.0

3.0

(71.1–82.8)


TABLE 6. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have health care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Richland County, South Carolina

660

81.3

3.5

(74.4–88.1)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

605

93.4

1.6

(90.2–96.5)

Pennington County, South Dakota

666

87.4

1.9

(83.6–91.1)

Davidson County, Tennessee

418

84.5

2.7

(79.2–89.7)

Hamilton County, Tennessee

386

82.5

3.3

(76.0–88.9)

Knox County, Tennessee

370

87.3

2.7

(82.0–92.5)

Shelby County, Tennessee

394

88.3

3.2

(82.0–94.5)

Sullivan County, Tennessee

461

86.9

2.6

(81.8–91.9)

Bexar County, Texas

970

85.3

1.6

(82.1–88.4)

Dallas County, Texas

392

75.0

3.7

(67.7–82.2)

El Paso County, Texas

869

62.5

2.4

(57.7–67.2)

Fort Bend County, Texas

925

86.4

1.6

(83.2–89.5)

Harris County, Texas

1,455

74.3

1.8

(70.7–77.8)

Hidalgo County, Texas

595

45.7

2.8

(40.2–51.1)

Lubbock County, Texas

752

77.3

2.8

(71.8–82.7)

Midland County, Texas

524

84.5

2.4

(79.7–89.2)

Potter County, Texas

337

78.6

3.2

(72.3–84.8)

Randall County, Texas

459

86.1

2.4

(81.3–90.8)

Smith County, Texas

673

76.3

3.3

(69.8–82.7)

Tarrant County, Texas

602

81.7

2.6

(76.6–86.7)

Travis County, Texas

762

88.0

2.5

(83.1–92.9)

Val Verde County, Texas

556

74.7

3.4

(68.0–81.3)

Webb County, Texas

924

51.2

2.2

(46.8–55.5)

Wichita County, Texas

677

76.7

2.9

(71.0–82.3)

Davis County, Utah

878

87.7

2.1

(83.5–91.8)

Salt Lake County, Utah

3,283

82.9

1.0

(80.9–84.8)

Summit County, Utah

453

84.4

2.9

(78.7–90.0)

Tooele County, Utah

563

84.9

2.2

(80.5–89.2)

Utah County, Utah

1,110

85.3

1.8

(81.7–88.8)

Weber County, Utah

773

86.6

2.2

(82.2–90.9)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,427

94.4

1.0

(92.4–96.3)

Franklin County, Vermont

486

93.5

1.2

(91.1–95.8)

Orange County, Vermont

357

90.1

2.2

(85.7–94.4)

Rutland County, Vermont

659

88.3

2.2

(83.9–92.6)

Washington County, Vermont

671

92.0

1.8

(88.4–95.5)

Windsor County, Vermont

678

88.6

1.8

(85.0–92.1)

Benton County, Washington

390

90.2

2.0

(86.2–94.1)

Clark County, Washington

1,090

84.8

2.0

(80.8–88.7)

Franklin County, Washington

255

69.3

4.4

(60.6–77.9)

King County, Washington

3,039

86.8

1.1

(84.6–88.9)

Kitsap County, Washington

922

88.4

1.8

(84.8–91.9)

Pierce County, Washington

1,719

87.9

1.2

(85.5–90.2)

Snohomish County, Washington

1,652

85.0

1.4

(82.2–87.7)

Spokane County, Washington

1,212

86.0

1.7

(82.6–89.3)

Thurston County, Washington

773

85.7

2.2

(81.3–90.0)

Yakima County, Washington

737

78.1

2.4

(73.3–82.8)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

489

87.6

2.5

(82.7–92.5)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

1,213

87.9

2.1

(83.7–92.0)

Laramie County, Wyoming

912

85.9

1.7

(82.5–89.2)

Natrona County, Wyoming

766

81.8

2.2

(77.4–86.1)

Median

87.2

Range

45.7-97.2

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Includes health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).

Estimate not available (NA) if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the confidence interval half width is >10.


TABLE 7. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

7,553

64.7

0.8

(63.1–66.3)

Alaska

1,947

69.4

1.6

(66.2–72.6)

Arizona

5,739

69.5

1.1

(67.2–71.7)

Arkansas

4,007

61.1

1.3

(58.6–63.6)

California

17,773

69.6

0.5

(68.6–70.6)

Colorado

11,586

68.0

0.7

(66.6–69.4)

Connecticut

6,755

81.6

0.8

(80.0–83.1)

Delaware

4,235

74.2

1.0

(72.3–76.1)

District of Columbia

3,962

75.3

1.0

(73.4–77.2)

Florida

34,979

66.4

0.6

(65.2–67.6)

Georgia

5,755

70.2

0.9

(68.4–71.9)

Hawaii

6,542

72.6

0.9

(70.9–74.3)

Idaho

6,991

69.3

0.8

(67.7–70.9)

Illinois

5,199

69.7

0.9

(67.8–71.5)

Indiana

10,173

68.8

0.7

(67.4–70.2)

Iowa

6,074

76.0

0.8

(74.4–77.6)

Kansas

8,510

72.9

0.7

(71.5–74.2)

Kentucky

8,005

63.2

1.0

(61.3–65.1)

Louisiana

6,979

63.9

0.8

(62.3–65.6)

Maine

8,107

68.7

0.7

(67.3–70.1)

Maryland

9,129

75.5

0.7

(74.1–76.9)

Massachusetts

16,228

81.7

0.5

(80.7–82.7)

Michigan

8,839

72.5

0.7

(71.1–73.9)

Minnesota

8,922

78.9

0.8

(77.2–80.5)

Mississippi

8,043

58.1

0.9

(56.4–59.8)

Missouri

5,416

64.3

1.1

(62.2–66.4)

Montana

7,281

61.1

1.0

(59.1–63.0)

Nebraska

16,331

69.5

0.8

(67.9–71.1)

Nevada

3,901

67.2

1.4

(64.6–69.9)

New Hampshire

6,026

76.7

0.8

(75.2–78.2)

New Jersey

12,361

76.0

0.6

(74.9–77.2)

New Mexico

6,960

67.2

0.9

(65.4–68.9)

New York

8,920

72.5

0.7

(71.2–73.8)

North Carolina

12,073

68.4

0.7

(67.0–69.8)

North Dakota

4,747

72.6

0.9

(70.8–74.5)

Ohio

9,809

71.5

0.7

(70.1–72.9)

Oklahoma

7,710

57.2

0.8

(55.6–58.7)

Oregon

5,035

70.4

1.0

(68.5–72.3)

Pennsylvania

11,187

72.3

0.6

(71.1–73.5)

Rhode Island

6,577

78.1

0.8

(76.5–79.7)

South Carolina

9,355

63.4

1.0

(61.5–65.3)

South Dakota

6,710

73.5

0.8

(71.9–75.2)

Tennessee

5,727

66.3

1.1

(64.2–68.4)

Texas

17,988

61.7

0.8

(60.2–63.2)

Utah

10,126

74.3

0.7

(73.0–75.6)

Vermont

6,773

75.6

0.7

(74.1–77.0)

Virginia

5,362

78.4

1.0

(76.5–80.3)

Washington

19,564

72.1

0.5

(71.1–73.1)

West Virginia

4,356

60.5

1.0

(58.6–62.4)

Wisconsin

4,767

75.1

1.0

(73.0–77.1)

Wyoming

5,828

69.0

0.9

(67.2–70.7)

Guam

780

61.2

2.2

(56.9–65.4)

Puerto Rico

3,504

69.8

1.0

(67.8–71.9)

Virgin Islands

1,808

57.7

1.6

(54.6–60.8)

Median

69.7

Range

57.2-81.7

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.


TABLE 8. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Akron, Ohio

809

75.6

2.2

(71.2–79.9)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

2,192

70.4

1.6

(67.2–73.5)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

1,083

73.9

2.0

(69.9–77.8)

Amarillo, Texas

826

64.2

2.5

(59.3–69.1)

Arcadia, Florida

500

47.1

4.2

(38.8–55.3)

Asheville, North Carolina

547

68.5

2.8

(63.0–73.9)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

2,340

70.6

1.6

(67.4–73.7)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

916

71.4

2.1

(67.2–75.5)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

866

67.9

2.5

(63.0–72.8)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

651

65.9

2.6

(60.8–70.9)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

970

69.0

3.3

(62.5–75.4)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

3,323

74.6

1.1

(72.4–76.7)

Bangor, Maine

690

67.6

2.4

(62.8–72.3)

Barre, Vermont

668

80.7

1.9

(76.9–84.4)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1,196

68.7

1.8

(65.1–72.2)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland*

1,640

81.6

1.3

(79.0–84.1)

Billings, Montana

536

66.3

2.8

(60.8–71.7)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

1,181

66.4

1.9

(62.6–70.1)

Bismarck, North Dakota

770

73.2

2.1

(69.0–77.3)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

1,661

70.1

1.7

(66.7–73.4)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts*

3,293

81.7

1.2

(79.3–84.0)

Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington

923

73.6

2.0

(69.6–77.5)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

2,178

83.1

1.5

(80.1–86.0)

Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Tonawanda, New York

607

77.2

2.5

(72.3–82.1)

Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont

1,994

81.8

1.1

(79.6–83.9)

Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts*

3,015

82.6

1.3

(80.0–85.1)

Camden, New Jersey*

1,694

73.9

1.5

(70.9–76.8)

Canton-Massillon, Ohio

745

68.0

2.5

(63.1–72.9)

Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Florida

517

67.3

3.1

(61.2–73.3)

Casper, Wyoming

765

68.8

2.3

(64.2–73.3)

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

556

81.1

2.3

(76.5–85.6)

Charleston, West Virginia

757

62.7

2.4

(57.9–67.4)

Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina

1,145

68.5

2.6

(63.4–73.5)

Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina-South Carolina

1,699

70.8

1.7

(67.4–74.1)

Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia

535

67.8

3.3

(61.3–74.2)

Cheyenne, Wyoming

910

72.5

2.0

(68.5–76.4)

Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin

5,012

70.0

1.1

(67.8–72.1)

Cincinnati-Middletown, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana

1,791

71.8

1.8

(68.2–75.3)

Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, Ohio

1,102

74.8

1.9

(71.0–78.5)

Coeur d´Alene, Idaho

569

69.7

2.7

(64.4–74.9)

Colorado Springs, Colorado

1,161

69.8

1.9

(66.0–73.5)

Columbia, South Carolina

1,132

64.6

2.5

(59.7–69.5)

Columbus, Ohio

1,380

74.4

1.8

(70.8–77.9)

Concord, New Hampshire

640

80.0

2.3

(75.4–84.5)

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas*

720

59.1

2.9

(53.4–64.7)

Dayton, Ohio

850

72.7

2.5

(67.8–77.6)

Del Rio, Texas

553

56.4

5.1

(46.4–66.3)

Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, Florida

857

65.6

2.6

(60.5–70.6)

Denver-Aurora, Colorado

4,810

72.4

1.0

(70.4–74.3)

Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa

1,005

77.5

1.8

(73.9–81.0)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan*

1,906

67.6

1.8

(64.0–71.1)

Dover, Delaware

1,249

67.1

2.0

(63.1–71.0)

Durham, North Carolina

1,032

69.9

2.4

(65.1–74.6)

Edison, New Jersey*

2,257

77.7

1.3

(75.1–80.2)

El Paso, Texas

869

55.9

2.4

(51.1–60.6)

Eugene-Springfield, Oregon

508

67.2

3.3

(60.7–73.6)

Evansville, Indiana-Kentucky

534

70.6

3.3

(64.1–77.0)

Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota

832

83.5

3.2

(77.2–89.7)

Farmington, New Mexico

681

64.7

2.8

(59.2–70.1)

Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri

700

62.8

3.1

(56.7–68.8)

Fort Collins-Loveland, Colorado

559

73.6

3.1

(67.5–79.6)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

719

74.5

2.2

(70.1–78.8)

Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas

731

63.8

2.8

(58.3–69.2)


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Gainesville, Florida

948

64.1

3.4

(57.4–70.7)

Grand Island, Nebraska

861

65.6

2.4

(60.8–70.3)

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan

622

72.7

2.6

(67.6–77.7)

Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina

1,157

70.2

2.4

(65.4–74.9)

Greenville, South Carolina

779

67.4

3.0

(61.5–73.2)

Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia

640

67.8

2.7

(62.5–73.0)

Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut

2,012

81.9

1.5

(78.9–84.8)

Hastings, Nebraska

583

69.1

2.8

(63.6–74.5)

Helena, Montana

641

72.2

2.6

(67.1–77.2)

Hickory-Morganton-Lenoir, North Carolina

599

63.9

2.7

(58.6–69.1)

Hilo, Hawaii

1,479

64.8

1.8

(61.2–68.3)

Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina

799

73.1

2.4

(68.3–77.8)

Homosassa Springs, Florida

532

59.2

3.0

(53.3–65.0)

Honolulu, Hawaii

2,957

74.3

1.2

(71.9–76.6)

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, Texas

2,729

64.5

1.7

(61.1–67.8)

Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio

653

58.6

2.7

(53.3–63.8)

Idaho Falls, Idaho

665

75.1

2.3

(70.5–79.6)

Indianapolis-Carmel, Indiana

2,250

71.5

1.5

(68.5–74.4)

Jackson, Mississippi

754

65.2

2.4

(60.4–69.9)

Jacksonville, Florida

2,585

67.7

2.0

(63.7–71.6)

Kahului-Wailuku, Hawaii

1,461

74.5

1.8

(70.9–78.0)

Kalispell, Montana

698

54.3

2.5

(49.4–59.2)

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas

3,367

71.9

1.3

(69.3–74.4)

Kapaa, Hawaii

645

66.9

2.9

(61.2–72.5)

Kennewick-Richland-Pasco, Washington

643

69.5

2.6

(64.4–74.5)

Key West-Marathon, Florida

505

71.6

3.0

(65.7–77.4)

Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia

648

69.0

3.0

(63.1–74.8)

Knoxville, Tennessee

526

67.4

3.5

(60.5–74.2)

Lake City, Florida

563

51.8

3.1

(45.7–57.8)

Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida

521

52.5

3.1

(46.4–58.5)

Laredo, Texas

921

51.9

2.2

(47.5–56.2)

Las Cruces, New Mexico

499

67.0

3.4

(60.3–73.6)

Las Vegas-Paradise, Nevada

1,263

67.2

1.8

(63.6–70.7)

Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont

1,554

71.3

1.7

(67.9–74.6)

Lewiston, Idaho-Washington

602

68.2

2.6

(63.1–73.2)

Lewiston-Auburn, Maine

501

61.9

2.9

(56.2–67.5)

Lincoln, Nebraska

1,132

74.6

2.3

(70.0–79.1)

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Arkansas

818

71.2

2.6

(66.1–76.2)

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California*

2,617

65.1

1.3

(62.5–67.6)

Louisville, Kentucky-Indiana

904

66.9

2.3

(62.3–71.4)

Lubbock, Texas

780

59.4

3.0

(53.5–65.2)

Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire

1,414

78.3

1.6

(75.1–81.4)

McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas

594

48.2

2.8

(42.7–53.6)

Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas

1,154

65.0

2.8

(59.5–70.4)

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, Florida

1,028

63.7

2.3

(59.1–68.2)

Midland, Texas

522

66.8

2.9

(61.1–72.4)

Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin

1,528

79.2

1.9

(75.4–82.9)

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin

4,848

81.1

1.1

(78.9–83.2)

Minot, North Dakota

555

75.6

2.2

(71.2–79.9)

Mobile, Alabama

678

61.2

2.9

(55.5–66.8)

Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

551

62.4

3.0

(56.5–68.2)

Naples-Marco Island, Florida

520

72.5

3.5

(65.6–79.3)

Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, Tennessee

830

70.6

2.6

(65.5–75.6)

Nassau-Suffolk, New York*

1,071

74.0

1.9

(70.2–77.7)

Newark-Union, New Jersey-Pennsylvania*

3,315

78.6

1.1

(76.4–80.7)

New Haven-Milford, Connecticut

1,673

80.1

1.6

(76.9–83.2)

New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, Louisiana

1,527

66.1

1.8

(62.5–69.6)

New York-White Plains-Wayne, New York-New Jersey*

6,177

72.6

0.9

(70.8–74.3)

Norfolk, Nebraska

674

65.1

2.7

(59.8–70.3)

North Platte, Nebraska

North Port-Bradenton-Sarasota, Florida

575

1,133

66.5

70.3

2.9

2.2

(60.8–72.1)

(65.9–74.6)

Ocala, Florida

589

57.9

2.9

(52.2–63.5)

Ocean City, New Jersey

516

77.9

2.5

(73.0–82.8)


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Ogden-Clearfield, Utah

1,695

75.2

1.6

(72.0–78.3)

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

2,465

61.6

1.3

(59.0–64.1)

Olympia, Washington

775

72.4

2.3

(67.8–76.9)

Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa

2,353

71.8

1.4

(69.0–74.5)

Orlando-Kissimmee, Florida

2,667

64.5

1.5

(61.5–67.4)

Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Florida

527

62.6

3.2

(56.3–68.8)

Panama City-Lynn Haven, Florida

Peabody, Massachusetts

544

2,131

68.8

81.8

3.4

1.6

(62.1–75.4)

(78.6–84.9)

Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Florida

1,012

57.0

2.4

(52.2–61.7)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

2,365

73.8

1.5

(70.8–76.7)

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona

1,682

70.0

1.8

(66.4–73.5)

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

2,415

72.9

1.3

(70.3–75.4)

Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine

2,626

74.6

1.2

(72.2–76.9)

Portland-Vancouver-Beaverton, Oregon-Washington

3,396

74.9

1.2

(72.5–77.2)

Port St. Lucie-Fort Pierce, Florida

1,023

64.7

2.4

(59.9–69.4)

Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, Rhode Island-Massachusetts

9,487

78.7

0.7

(77.3–80.0)

Provo-Orem, Utah

1,173

77.3

1.8

(73.7–80.8)

Raleigh-Cary, North Carolina

1,026

75.7

1.9

(71.9–79.4)

Rapid City, South Dakota

848

73.2

2.0

(69.2–77.1)

Reno-Sparks, Nevada

1,325

72.6

1.6

(69.4–75.7)

Richmond, Virginia

799

77.2

2.5

(72.3–82.1)

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California

1,879

66.0

1.6

(62.8–69.1)

Rochester, New York

568

73.0

2.9

(67.3–78.6)

Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire*

1,606

78.4

1.5

(75.4–81.3)

Rutland, Vermont

657

73.0

2.4

(68.2–77.7)

Sacramento-Arden-Arcade-Roseville, California

1,293

74.1

2.0

(70.1–78.0)

St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois

1,747

70.6

1.8

(67.0–74.1)

Salt Lake City, Utah

4,298

72.7

1.0

(70.7–74.6)

San Antonio, Texas

1,124

68.6

2.1

(64.4–72.7)

San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, California

1,695

74.1

1.5

(71.1–77.0)

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California

2,357

76.0

1.2

(73.6–78.3)

San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California

913

79.2

2.0

(75.2–83.1)

Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, California*

1,446

72.2

1.7

(68.8–75.5)

Santa Fe, New Mexico

609

69.2

2.9

(63.5–74.8)

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

759

61.4

2.6

(56.3–66.4)

Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

552

69.9

2.7

(64.6–75.1)

Seaford, Delaware

1,238

69.0

2.0

(65.0–72.9)

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington*

4,684

76.0

0.9

(74.2–77.7)

Sebring, Florida

520

59.7

3.3

(53.2–66.1)

Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana

681

62.7

2.7

(57.4–67.9)

Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota

1,219

71.7

2.7

(66.4–76.9)

Sioux Falls, South Dakota

838

79.7

1.8

(76.1–83.2)

Spokane, Washington

1,215

72.2

1.9

(68.4–75.9)

Springfield, Massachusetts

2,043

80.1

1.9

(76.3–83.8)

Tacoma, Washington*

1,719

72.4

1.5

(69.4–75.3)

Tallahassee, Florida

2,041

65.4

2.5

(60.5–70.3)

Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida

2,032

66.1

1.8

(62.5–69.6)

Toledo, Ohio

859

76.0

2.2

(71.6–80.3)

Topeka, Kansas

833

74.3

2.1

(70.1–78.4)

Trenton-Ewing, New Jersey

500

80.2

2.6

(75.1–85.2)

Tucson, Arizona

698

67.7

3.1

(61.6–73.7)

Tulsa, Oklahoma

2,141

56.6

1.5

(53.6–59.5)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

514

60.8

3.4

(54.1–67.4)

Twin Falls, Idaho

537

69.0

2.8

(63.5–74.4)

Tyler, Texas

670

67.4

2.9

(61.7–73.0)

Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina

1,096

75.4

2.3

(70.8–79.9)

Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan*

1,797

79.4

1.4

(76.6–82.1)

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia*

6,427

80.9

1.2

(78.5–83.2)

Wauchula, Florida

526

53.8

3.9

(46.1–61.4)

West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Boynton Beach, Florida

551

74.0

3.0

(68.1–79.8)

Wichita, Kansas

1,846

75.4

1.4

(72.6–78.1)

Wichita Falls, Texas

829

65.2

2.8

(59.7–70.6)

Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey*

2,208

75.8

1.2

(73.4–78.1)


TABLE 8. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Worcester, Massachusetts

2,094

80.4

1.6

(77.2–83.5)

Yakima, Washington

739

69.3

2.4

(64.5–74.0)

Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania

1,058

67.8

2.8

(62.3–73.2)

Median

70.2

Range

47.1-83.5

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Metropolitan division.


TABLE 9. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Jefferson County, Alabama

592

66.8

2.6

(61.7–71.8)

Mobile County, Alabama

678

61.2

2.9

(55.5–66.8)

Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

432

61.3

3.7

(54.0–68.5)

Maricopa County, Arizona

1,300

69.8

2.0

(65.8–73.7)

Pima County, Arizona

698

67.7

3.1

(61.6–73.7)

Pinal County, Arizona

382

71.1

3.6

(64.0–78.1)

Benton County, Arkansas

361

69.8

3.5

(62.9–76.6)

Pulaski County, Arkansas

557

75.6

3.1

(69.5–81.6)

Washington County, Arkansas

298

66.9

4.3

(58.4–75.3)

Alameda County, California

757

75.2

2.1

(71.0–79.3)

Contra Costa County, California

632

78.1

2.3

(73.5–82.6)

Los Angeles County, California

2,617

65.1

1.3

(62.5–67.6)

Orange County, California

1,446

72.2

1.7

(68.8–75.5)

Placer County, California

254

81.8

3.3

(75.3–88.2)

Riverside County, California

932

67.1

2.1

(62.9–71.2)

Sacramento County, California

752

73.5

2.2

(69.1–77.8)

San Bernardino County, California

947

65.1

2.3

(60.5–69.6)

San Diego County, California

1,695

74.1

1.5

(71.1–77.0)

San Francisco County, California

386

76.5

2.8

(71.0–81.9)

San Mateo County, California

384

77.3

3.0

(71.4–83.1)

Santa Clara County, California

875

80.4

1.9

(76.6–84.1)

Adams County, Colorado

803

63.7

2.5

(58.8–68.6)

Arapahoe County, Colorado

869

77.1

1.7

(73.7–80.4)

Denver County, Colorado

870

70.9

2.2

(66.5–75.2)

Douglas County, Colorado

576

78.6

2.6

(73.5–83.6)

El Paso County, Colorado

1,029

69.9

2.0

(65.9–73.8)

Jefferson County, Colorado

1,168

72.8

2.0

(68.8–76.7)

Larimer County, Colorado

559

73.6

3.1

(67.5–79.6)

Fairfield County, Connecticut

2,178

83.1

1.5

(80.1–86.0)

Hartford County, Connecticut

1,496

81.1

1.7

(77.7–84.4)

Middlesex County, Connecticut

262

88.2

2.5

(83.3–93.1)

New Haven County, Connecticut

1,673

80.1

1.6

(76.9–83.2)

Tolland County, Connecticut

254

83.2

3.3

(76.7–89.6)

Kent County, Delaware

1,249

67.1

2.0

(63.1–71.0)

New Castle County, Delaware

1,748

78.3

1.3

(75.7–80.8)

Sussex County, Delaware

1,238

69.0

2.0

(65.0–72.9)

District of Columbia, District of Columbia

3,962

74.1

1.2

(71.7–76.4)

Alachua County, Florida

534

66.0

3.4

(59.3–72.6)

Baker County, Florida

509

58.9

4.8

(49.4–68.3)

Bay County, Florida

544

68.8

3.4

(62.1–75.4)

Brevard County, Florida

527

62.6

3.2

(56.3–68.8)

Broward County, Florida

524

64.9

2.9

(59.2–70.5)

Citrus County, Florida

532

59.2

3.0

(53.3–65.0)

Clay County, Florida

486

71.5

2.7

(66.2–76.7)

Collier County, Florida

520

72.5

3.5

(65.6–79.3)

Columbia County, Florida

563

51.8

3.1

(45.7–57.8)

DeSoto County, Florida

500

47.1

4.2

(38.8–55.3)

Duval County, Florida

548

66.3

2.8

(60.8–71.7)

Escambia County, Florida

519

52.0

3.4

(45.3–58.6)

Gadsden County, Florida

506

51.6

3.6

(44.5–58.6)

Gilchrist County, Florida

414

NA*

NA

NA

Hardee County, Florida

526

53.8

3.9

(46.1–61.4)

Hernando County, Florida

489

62.2

3.0

(56.3–68.0)

Highlands County, Florida

520

59.7

3.3

(53.2–66.1)

Hillsborough County, Florida

505

65.0

3.1

(58.9–71.0)

Jefferson County, Florida

502

53.5

4.0

(45.6–61.3)

Lake County, Florida

604

68.6

2.6

(63.5–73.6)

Lee County, Florida

517

67.3

3.1

(61.2–73.3)

Leon County, Florida

496

72.5

3.1

(66.4–78.5)

Manatee County, Florida

525

64.2

3.3

(57.7–70.6)

Marion County, Florida

589

57.9

2.9

(52.2–63.5)

Martin County, Florida

521

71.8

2.8

(66.3–77.2)

Miami-Dade County, Florida

504

66.8

3.0

(60.9–72.6)


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Monroe County, Florida

505

71.6

3.0

(65.7–77.4)

Nassau County, Florida

521

68.1

3.8

(60.6–75.5)

Orange County, Florida

1,004

64.8

2.2

(60.4–69.1)

Osceola County, Florida

567

55.6

3.1

(49.5–61.6)

Palm Beach County, Florida

551

74.0

3.0

(68.1–79.8)

Pasco County, Florida

541

63.7

3.3

(57.2–70.1)

Pinellas County, Florida

497

70.0

3.1

(63.9–76.0)

Polk County, Florida

521

52.5

3.1

(46.4–58.5)

St. Johns County, Florida

521

78.1

2.6

(73.0–83.1)

St. Lucie County, Florida

502

62.4

3.0

(56.5–68.2)

Santa Rosa County, Florida

493

64.8

3.0

(58.9–70.6)

Sarasota County, Florida

608

74.4

2.8

(68.9–79.8)

Seminole County, Florida

492

67.0

3.0

(61.1–72.8)

Volusia County, Florida

857

65.6

2.6

(60.5–70.6)

Wakulla County, Florida

537

53.7

3.6

(46.6–60.7)

Cobb County, Georgia

253

78.1

3.3

(71.6–84.5)

DeKalb County, Georgia

339

76.9

3.2

(70.6–83.1)

Fulton County, Georgia

329

73.8

3.7

(66.5–81.0)

Gwinnett County, Georgia

251

76.7

3.3

(70.2–83.1)

Hawaii County, Hawaii

1,479

64.8

1.8

(61.2–68.3)

Honolulu County, Hawaii

2,957

74.3

1.2

(71.9–76.6)

Kauai County, Hawaii

645

66.9

2.9

(61.2–72.5)

Maui County, Hawaii

1,461

74.5

1.8

(70.9–78.0)

Ada County, Idaho

866

73.9

2.3

(69.3–78.4)

Bonneville County, Idaho

522

77.6

2.4

(72.8–82.3)

Canyon County, Idaho

618

66.0

2.6

(60.9–71.0)

Kootenai County, Idaho

569

69.7

2.7

(64.4–74.9)

Nez Perce County, Idaho

381

67.4

3.2

(61.1–73.6)

Twin Falls County, Idaho

432

71.5

2.9

(65.8–77.1)

Cook County, Illinois

2,885

67.7

1.3

(65.1–70.2)

DuPage County, Illinois

256

76.2

3.4

(69.5–82.8)

Allen County, Indiana

584

74.4

2.5

(69.5–79.3)

Lake County, Indiana

996

64.5

2.8

(59.0–69.9)

Marion County, Indiana

1,460

69.4

2.0

(65.4–73.3)

Linn County, Iowa

493

82.3

2.3

(77.7–86.8)

Polk County, Iowa

766

77.3

2.1

(73.1–81.4)

Johnson County, Kansas

1,413

84.1

1.3

(81.5–86.6)

Sedgwick County, Kansas

1,430

75.0

1.6

(71.8–78.1)

Shawnee County, Kansas

622

75.0

2.5

(70.1–79.9)

Wyandotte County, Kansas

599

56.9

3.1

(50.8–62.9)

Jefferson County, Kentucky

409

65.9

3.1

(59.8–71.9)

Caddo Parish, Louisiana

446

59.1

3.3

(52.6–65.5)

East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

720

67.5

2.5

(62.6–72.4)

Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

593

67.0

2.7

(61.7–72.2)

Orleans Parish, Louisiana

373

60.6

3.5

(53.7–67.4)

St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

370

67.2

3.7

(59.9–74.4)

Androscoggin County, Maine

501

61.9

2.9

(56.2–67.5)

Cumberland County, Maine

1,387

76.9

1.8

(73.3–80.4)

Kennebec County, Maine

651

65.9

2.6

(60.8–70.9)

Penobscot County, Maine

690

67.6

2.4

(62.8–72.3)

Sagadahoc County, Maine

298

68.2

3.3

(61.7–74.6)

York County, Maine

941

72.4

1.9

(68.6–76.1)

Anne Arundel County, Maryland

600

78.9

2.4

(74.1–83.6)

Baltimore County, Maryland

1,048

75.9

1.7

(72.5–79.2)

Cecil County, Maryland

267

73.3

3.3

(66.8–79.7)

Charles County, Maryland

347

75.5

3.2

(69.2–81.7)

Frederick County, Maryland

577

79.1

2.2

(74.7–83.4)

Harford County, Maryland

279

77.1

3.2

(70.8–83.3)

Howard County, Maryland

340

84.7

2.6

(79.6–89.7)

Montgomery County, Maryland

1,063

82.2

1.6

(79.0–85.3)

Prince George´s County, Maryland

791

73.2

2.2

(68.8–77.5)

Queen Anne´s County, Maryland

295

75.3

3.7

(68.0–82.5)

Washington County, Maryland

404

66.9

3.3

(60.4–73.3)


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Baltimore city, Maryland

528

62.5

3.1

(56.4–68.5)

Bristol County, Massachusetts

2,910

79.7

1.4

(76.9–82.4)

Essex County, Massachusetts

2,131

82.1

1.8

(78.5–85.6)

Hampden County, Massachusetts

1,587

79.8

2.2

(75.4–84.1)

Hampshire County, Massachusetts

274

81.0

3.8

(73.5–88.4)

Middlesex County, Massachusetts

3,015

81.8

1.5

(78.8–84.7)

Norfolk County, Massachusetts

857

83.2

1.9

(79.4–86.9)

Plymouth County, Massachusetts

682

83.7

2.1

(79.5–87.8)

Suffolk County, Massachusetts

1,754

81.2

1.6

(78.0–84.3)

Worcester County, Massachusetts

2,094

80.4

1.6

(77.2–83.5)

Kent County, Michigan

445

73.7

3.0

(67.8–79.5)

Macomb County, Michigan

515

81.2

2.2

(76.8–85.5)

Oakland County, Michigan

934

80.8

1.9

(77.0–84.5)

Wayne County, Michigan

1,906

67.6

1.8

(64.0–71.1)

Anoka County, Minnesota

397

82.2

2.7

(76.9–87.4)

Dakota County, Minnesota

570

84.4

2.3

(79.8–88.9)

Hennepin County, Minnesota

2,047

79.6

1.8

(76.0–83.1)

Ramsey County, Minnesota

914

78.9

3.1

(72.8–84.9)

Washington County, Minnesota

258

87.4

2.6

(82.3–92.4)

DeSoto County, Mississippi

368

68.8

3.6

(61.7–75.8)

Hinds County, Mississippi

334

60.2

3.8

(52.7–67.6)

Jackson County, Missouri

526

66.1

2.8

(60.6–71.5)

St. Louis County, Missouri

604

71.7

3.0

(65.8–77.5)

St. Louis city, Missouri

646

62.4

3.2

(56.1–68.6)

Flathead County, Montana

698

54.3

2.5

(49.4–59.2)

Lewis and Clark County, Montana

532

72.1

2.6

(67.0–77.1)

Yellowstone County, Montana

485

66.6

2.9

(60.9–72.2)

Adams County, Nebraska

475

73.0

2.8

(67.5–78.4)

Dakota County, Nebraska

739

63.1

2.4

(58.3–67.8)

Douglas County, Nebraska

951

72.3

2.1

(68.1–76.4)

Hall County, Nebraska

587

65.0

3.0

(59.1–70.8)

Lancaster County, Nebraska

848

74.7

2.5

(69.8–79.6)

Lincoln County, Nebraska

543

67.5

2.9

(61.8–73.1)

Madison County, Nebraska

466

67.4

3.3

(60.9–73.8)

Sarpy County, Nebraska

577

72.8

2.9

(67.1–78.4)

Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

736

59.8

2.7

(54.5–65.0)

Seward County, Nebraska

284

71.5

3.5

(64.6–78.3)

Clark County, Nevada

1,263

67.2

1.8

(63.6–70.7)

Washoe County, Nevada

1,305

72.3

1.6

(69.1–75.4)

Grafton County, New Hampshire

516

71.5

3.0

(65.6–77.3)

Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

1,414

78.3

1.6

(75.1–81.4)

Merrimack County, New Hampshire

640

80.0

2.3

(75.4–84.5)

Rockingham County, New Hampshire

1,020

81.7

1.6

(78.5–84.8)

Strafford County, New Hampshire

586

70.9

2.7

(65.6–76.1)

Atlantic County, New Jersey

916

71.4

2.1

(67.2–75.5)

Bergen County, New Jersey

623

81.8

2.0

(77.8–85.7)

Burlington County, New Jersey

566

77.4

2.3

(72.8–81.9)

Camden County, New Jersey

602

70.1

2.8

(64.6–75.5)

Cape May County, New Jersey

516

77.9

2.5

(73.0–82.8)

Essex County, New Jersey

1,021

76.2

1.7

(72.8–79.5)

Gloucester County, New Jersey

526

76.4

2.5

(71.5–81.3)

Hudson County, New Jersey

1,089

69.1

1.9

(65.3–72.8)

Hunterdon County, New Jersey

515

85.7

2.1

(81.5–89.8)

Mercer County, New Jersey

500

80.2

2.6

(75.1–85.2)

Middlesex County, New Jersey

631

78.4

2.2

(74.0–82.7)

Monmouth County, New Jersey

560

81.0

2.2

(76.6–85.3)

Morris County, New Jersey

702

81.6

2.1

(77.4–85.7)

Ocean County, New Jersey

530

72.4

2.6

(67.3–77.4)

Passaic County, New Jersey

502

72.7

2.7

(67.4–77.9)

Somerset County, New Jersey

536

85.5

2.0

(81.5–89.4)

Sussex County, New Jersey

498

82.1

2.1

(77.9–86.2)

Union County, New Jersey

519

75.4

2.6

(70.3–80.4)

Warren County, New Jersey

477

77.4

2.5

(72.5–82.3)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico

1,262

72.8

1.9

(69.0–76.5)


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Dona Ana County, New Mexico

499

67.0

3.4

(60.3–73.6)

Sandoval County, New Mexico

520

66.0

3.3

(59.5–72.4)

San Juan County, New Mexico

681

64.7

2.8

(59.2–70.1)

Santa Fe County, New Mexico

609

69.2

2.9

(63.5–74.8)

Valencia County, New Mexico

350

61.1

3.8

(53.6–68.5)

Bronx County, New York

433

67.7

3.0

(61.8–73.5)

Erie County, New York

477

81.1

2.3

(76.5–85.6)

Kings County, New York

906

70.5

2.0

(66.5–74.4)

Monroe County, New York

382

73.0

3.4

(66.3–79.6)

Nassau County, New York

478

76.1

2.6

(71.0–81.1)

New York County, New York

1,040

77.4

2.1

(73.2–81.5)

Queens County, New York

798

71.9

2.1

(67.7–76.0)

Suffolk County, New York

593

73.5

2.6

(68.4–78.5)

Westchester County, New York

384

77.8

3.0

(71.9–83.6)

Buncombe County, North Carolina

263

63.7

3.9

(56.0–71.3)

Cabarrus County, North Carolina

304

62.5

3.8

(55.0–69.9)

Catawba County, North Carolina

293

70.6

3.4

(63.9–77.2)

Durham County, North Carolina

620

72.5

2.6

(67.4–77.5)

Gaston County, North Carolina

265

64.8

4.2

(56.5–73.0)

Guilford County, North Carolina

693

76.6

2.2

(72.2–80.9)

Johnston County, North Carolina

275

72.2

3.2

(65.9–78.4)

Mecklenburg County, North Carolina

606

78.1

2.4

(73.3–82.8)

Orange County, North Carolina

297

70.5

4.0

(62.6–78.3)

Randolph County, North Carolina

395

65.5

3.4

(58.8–72.1)

Union County, North Carolina

346

69.4

3.6

(62.3–76.4)

Wake County, North Carolina

712

77.6

2.4

(72.8–82.3)

Burleigh County, North Dakota

560

78.3

2.5

(73.4–83.2)

Cass County, North Dakota

779

83.9

1.9

(80.1–87.6)

Ward County, North Dakota

464

77.2

2.4

(72.4–81.9)

Cuyahoga County, Ohio

721

73.6

2.3

(69.0–78.1)

Franklin County, Ohio

679

75.4

2.3

(70.8–79.9)

Hamilton County, Ohio

725

75.5

2.4

(70.7–80.2)

Lucas County, Ohio

725

74.3

2.3

(69.7–78.8)

Mahoning County, Ohio

727

73.0

2.4

(68.2–77.7)

Montgomery County, Ohio

702

74.8

2.3

(70.2–79.3)

Stark County, Ohio

714

67.8

2.5

(62.9–72.7)

Summit County, Ohio

703

73.6

2.5

(68.7–78.5)

Cleveland County, Oklahoma

431

70.6

2.8

(65.1–76.0)

Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

1,433

57.3

1.8

(53.7–60.8)

Tulsa County, Oklahoma

1,520

58.7

1.7

(55.3–62.0)

Clackamas County, Oregon

450

76.7

2.7

(71.4–81.9)

Lane County, Oregon

508

67.2

3.3

(60.7–73.6)

Multnomah County, Oregon

812

76.8

2.2

(72.4–81.1)

Washington County, Oregon

584

77.4

2.3

(72.8–81.9)

Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

1,379

75.6

1.6

(72.4–78.7)

Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

282

75.0

3.0

(69.1–80.8)

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

310

65.5

3.9

(57.8–73.1)

Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

347

80.3

3.0

(74.4–86.1)

Northampton County, Pennsylvania

260

75.5

4.3

(67.0–83.9)

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

1,402

62.2

1.9

(58.4–65.9)

Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania

336

73.4

3.2

(67.1–79.6)

Bristol County, Rhode Island

278

86.3

2.6

(81.2–91.3)

Kent County, Rhode Island

938

76.5

1.9

(72.7–80.2)

Newport County, Rhode Island

488

83.5

2.4

(78.7–88.2)

Providence County, Rhode Island

4,127

77.5

1.0

(75.5–79.4)

Washington County, Rhode Island

746

78.7

2.5

(73.8–83.6)

Aiken County, South Carolina

469

71.7

2.7

(66.4–76.9)

Beaufort County, South Carolina

679

76.0

2.5

(71.1–80.9)

Berkeley County, South Carolina

355

NA

NA

NA

Charleston County, South Carolina

666

73.1

3.1

(67.0–79.1)

Greenville County, South Carolina

493

70.2

3.4

(63.5–76.8)

Horry County, South Carolina

551

62.4

3.0

(56.5–68.2)

Richland County, South Carolina

662

63.2

3.8

(55.7–70.6)

Minnehaha County, South Dakota

604

81.2

2.0

(77.2–85.1)


TABLE 9. (Continued) Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have had a dental visit during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

County

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Pennington County, South Dakota

667

74.1

2.3

(69.5–78.6)

Davidson County, Tennessee

418

68.1

3.6

(61.0–75.1)

Hamilton County, Tennessee

384

71.8

3.3

(65.3–78.2)

Knox County, Tennessee

366

74.3

3.2

(68.0–80.5)

Shelby County, Tennessee

393

72.0

3.5

(65.1–78.8)

Sullivan County, Tennessee

457

72.8

2.9

(67.1–78.4)

Bexar County, Texas

965

69.4

2.2

(65.0–73.7)

Dallas County, Texas

392

54.7

3.8

(47.2–62.1)

El Paso County, Texas

869

55.9

2.4

(51.1–60.6)

Fort Bend County, Texas

923

73.8

2.1

(69.6–77.9)

Harris County, Texas

1,452

64.0

1.9

(60.2–67.7)

Hidalgo County, Texas

594

48.2

2.8

(42.7–53.6)

Lubbock County, Texas

756

59.9

2.9

(54.2–65.5)

Midland County, Texas

522

66.8

2.9

(61.1–72.4)

Potter County, Texas

336

55.9

3.7

(48.6–63.1)

Randall County, Texas

459

70.7

3.3

(64.2–77.1)

Smith County, Texas

670

67.4

2.9

(61.7–73.0)

Tarrant County, Texas

599

64.2

3.1

(58.1–70.2)

Travis County, Texas

757

72.7

4.1

(64.6–80.7)

Val Verde County, Texas

553

56.4

5.1

(46.4–66.3)

Webb County, Texas

921

51.9

2.2

(47.5–56.2)

Wichita County, Texas

678

62.7

3.1

(56.6–68.7)

Davis County, Utah

876

75.4

2.2

(71.0–79.7)

Salt Lake County, Utah

3,278

72.4

1.1

(70.2–74.5)

Summit County, Utah

453

79.1

2.9

(73.4–84.7)

Tooele County, Utah

567

73.6

2.5

(68.7–78.5)

Utah County, Utah

1,110

77.4

1.8

(73.8–80.9)

Weber County, Utah

774

74.6

2.1

(70.4–78.7)

Chittenden County, Vermont

1,430

84.3

1.3

(81.7–86.8)

Franklin County, Vermont

483

75.6

2.3

(71.0–80.1)

Orange County, Vermont

358

69.4

3.0

(63.5–75.2)

Rutland County, Vermont

657

73.0

2.4

(68.2–77.7)

Washington County, Vermont

668

80.7

1.9

(76.9–84.4)

Windsor County, Vermont

680

71.6

2.3

(67.0–76.1)

Benton County, Washington

389

74.2

2.8

(68.7–79.6)

Clark County, Washington

1,094

70.4

2.2

(66.0–74.7)

Franklin County, Washington

254

63.6

4.7

(54.3–72.8)

King County, Washington

3,032

77.8

1.1

(75.6–79.9)

Kitsap County, Washington

923

73.6

2.0

(69.6–77.5)

Pierce County, Washington

1,719

73.0

1.4

(70.2–75.7)

Snohomish County, Washington

1,652

72.1

1.5

(69.1–75.0)

Spokane County, Washington

1,215

72.2

1.9

(68.4–75.9)

Thurston County, Washington

775

72.4

2.3

(67.8–76.9)

Yakima County, Washington

739

69.3

2.4

(64.5–74.0)

Kanawha County, West Virginia

480

68.7

3.1

(62.6–74.7)

Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

1,215

74.4

2.7

(69.1–79.6)

Laramie County, Wyoming

910

72.5

2.0

(68.5–76.4)

Natrona County, Wyoming

765

68.8

2.3

(64.2–73.3)

Median

72.4

Range

47.1-88.2

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.

* Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the confidence interval half width is >10.


TABLE 10. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

State/Territory

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Alabama

2,646

25.5

1.1

(23.3–27.7)

Alaska

320

16.2

3.4

(9.5–22.8)

Arizona

2,316

13.8

1.0

(11.8–15.7)

Arkansas

1,599

23.3

1.3

(20.9–25.8)

California

5,386

10.6

0.6

(9.3–11.8)

Colorado

3,271

13.4

0.7

(12.0–14.8)

Connecticut

2,141

9.2

0.7

(7.8–10.6)

Delaware

1,404

16.4

1.1

(14.1–18.6)

District of Columbia

1,184

12.1

1.3

(9.6–14.7)

Florida

13,863

13.3

0.6

(12.2–14.4)

Georgia

1,722

21.0

1.2

(18.7–23.3)

Hawaii

2,133

7.4

0.7

(6.0–8.9)

Idaho

2,365

15.7

0.8

(14.1–17.3)

Illinois

1,673

15.2

1.1

(13.1–17.3)

Indiana

3,328

21.3

0.8

(19.7–23.0)

Iowa

2,131

16.9

0.9

(15.1–18.6)

Kansas

2,863

17.9

0.8

(16.4–19.5)

Kentucky

2,583

27.4

1.2

(25.0–29.8)

Louisiana

2,110

25.6

1.1

(23.4–27.8)

Maine

2,583

20.7

0.9

(18.9–22.4)

Maryland

2,440

13.6

0.9

(11.9–15.3)

Massachusetts

4,523

15.2

0.8

(13.7–16.7)

Michigan

3,082

13.1

0.7

(11.8–14.4)

Minnesota

2,364

11.2

0.8

(9.6–12.8)

Mississippi

2,900

27.1

1.0

(25.1–29.2)

Missouri

1,929

19.5

1.1

(17.4–21.7)

Montana

2,387

17.6

0.9

(15.7–19.4)

Nebraska

6,045

15.2

0.7

(13.8–16.7)

Nevada

1,234

17.2

1.5

(14.4–20.1)

New Hampshire

1,899

17.2

1.0

(15.3–19.1)

New Jersey

3,310

14.1

0.8

(12.6–15.7)

New Mexico

2,284

18.5

1.0

(16.6–20.4)

New York

2,893

14.7

0.7

(13.3–16.1)

North Carolina

3,824

21.5

0.9

(19.7–23.4)

North Dakota

1,474

18.8

1.1

(16.7–20.9)

Ohio

3,010

19.8

0.9

(18.1–21.6)

Oklahoma

2,763

24.6

0.9

(22.7–26.4)

Oregon

1,801

13.7

0.9

(12.0–15.4)

Pennsylvania

3,812

18.0

0.7

(16.6–19.4)

Rhode Island

2,100

16.5

0.9

(14.7–18.2)

South Carolina

3,328

21.6

1.0

(19.5–23.6)

South Dakota

2,298

18.2

0.9

(16.3–20.0)

Tennessee

2,002

33.7

1.4

(31.0–36.5)

Texas

5,939

14.1

0.8

(12.5–15.7)

Utah

2,486

12.8

0.8

(11.2–14.3)

Vermont

2,123

17.5

0.9

(15.7–19.2)

Virginia

1,567

15.0

1.0

(13.1–17.0)

Washington

6,439

12.0

0.5

(11.1–12.9)

West Virginia

1,486

36.0

1.4

(33.3–38.8)

Wisconsin

1,374

16.3

1.1

(14.0–18.5)

Wyoming

1,947

18.6

1.0

(16.7–20.5)

Guam

114

23.7

4.8

(14.4–33.1)

Puerto Rico

1,401

20.1

1.1

(17.9–22.4)

Virgin Islands

429

12.1

1.8

(8.6–15.6)

Median

17.1

Range

7.4-36.0

Abbreviations: SE = standard error; CI = confidence interval.


TABLE 11. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have had all their natural teeth extracted, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area (MMSA) — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2010

MMSA

Sample size

%

SE

(95% CI)

Akron, Ohio

263

22.1

3.2

(15.8–28.3)

Albuquerque, New Mexico

687

14.9

1.6

(11.7–18.0)

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey

357

16.5

2.2

(12.1–20.8)

Amarillo, Texas

291

12.8

2.1

(8.6–16.9)

Arcadia, Florida

226

18.4

2.9

(12.7–24.0)

Asheville, North Carolina

235

19.8

2.8

(14.3–25.2)

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia

600

19.6

2.2

(15.2–23.9)

Atlantic City, New Jersey

262

17.5

2.6

(12.4–22.5)

Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina

296

23.5

3.1

(17.4–29.5)

Augusta-Waterville, Maine

195

18.5

3.0

(12.6–24.3)

Austin-Round Rock, Texas

257

10.5

2.8

(5.0–15.9)

Baltimore-Towson, Maryland

853

12.8

1.4

(10.0–15.5)

Bangor, Maine

187

27.8

3.5

(20.9–34.6)

Barre, Vermont

230

20.4

3.0

(14.5–26.2)

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

333

25.1

2.9

(19.4–30.7)

Bethesda-Gaithersburg-Frederick, Maryland*

397

5.2

1.2

(2.8–7.5)

Billings, Montana

209

13.4

2.8

(7.9–18.8)

Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama

394

24.9

2.7

(19.6–30.1)

Bismarck, North Dakota

232

21.7

2.8

(16.2–27.1)

Boise City-Nampa, Idaho

561

9.3

1.3

(6.7–11.8)

Boston-Quincy, Massachusetts*

913

14.9

1.6

(11.7–18.0)

Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington

281

9.5

1.9

(5.7–13.2)

Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut

680

6.9

1.2

(4.5–9.2)