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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

1. Firearm Homicides and Suicides in Major Metropolitan Areas — United States, 2006–2007 and 2009–2010

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

Firearm suicide rates increased in a majority of the 50 most populous metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) while firearm homicide rates decreased in the majority of these areas. Youth, ages 10 to 19, are still substantially  impacted by gun violence. Community-based prevention strategies and programs can be effective in reducing youth violence. Firearm suicides and homicides represent a continuing public health concern. Between 2006-2007 and 2009-2010, the firearm suicide rate increased in nearly 75 percent of the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). Conversely, more than 75 percent of MSAs showed a decreased firearm homicide rate. The firearm suicide rate among youth, ages 10-19, was lower than the all-ages rate in both periods while the firearm homicide rate for youth continued to exceed the all-ages rate in many MSAs. Monitoring these patterns strengthens development and evaluation of community-based strategies and programs for reducing firearm-related violence.

2. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Outbreak Among University Students — Georgia, 2012

Nancy Nydam, Manager, Media Relations
nanydam@dhr.state.ga.us
404-657-2462

This report of a large university outbreak of Mycoplasma pneumoniae demonstrates that M. pneumoniae can cause prolonged outbreaks, resulting in severe disease among previously healthy students. Preventive health behaviors, including hand and respiratory hygiene and self-isolation when ill, can limit the spread of disease; inducing these among university students requires that they become aware of an outbreak, perceive a personal risk, and know of behaviors that can reduce their personal risk. Health messaging needs to reach students and educate them about their risk for infection and behaviors to prevent infection during respiratory disease outbreaks in a university setting, this coupled with university policies that facilitate students staying home and seeking medical care when ill might curtail an outbreak and the severe complications that can occur. Health messaging needs to reach students and educate them about their risk for infection and behaviors to prevent infection during respiratory disease outbreaks in a university setting, this coupled with university policies that facilitate students staying home and seeking medical care when ill might curtail an outbreak and the severe complications that can occur.

3. Vaccination Coverage Among Children in Kindergarten — United States, 2011–12 School Year

CDC Media Relations
404-639-3286

Most kindergarteners continue to be up-to-date on their vaccines, as shown by statewide levels of vaccination coverage being at or very near the Healthy People 2020 target of 95 percent for most states. While exemption levels were low nationally, outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases can still occur where there are clusters of unvaccinated children in schools and local communities.  This report serves as a good reminder to busy families to make sure their children are vaccinated according to CDC’s recommended schedule. Although state levels of vaccination coverage are at or very near target levels, vaccine preventable diseases remain a threat in schools and communities. The best way to prevent these potentially serious diseases is to get yourself and your family vaccinated according to CDC’s recommended schedule.

4. Notes from the Field

Use of Electronic Messaging and the News Media to Increase Case Finding During a Cyclospora Outbreak — Iowa, July 2013

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