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CDC Audio/Video Resources

CDC produces online videos, audio clips, podcasts, and public service announcements, and has a limited supply of B-Roll for productions.

Sound & Video Clips

Child Sodium Consumption

These broadcast quality clips feature Principal Deputy Director of CDC/ATSDR Ileana Arias, PhD

Clip 1

Nine out of ten school-aged children eat more sodium than they should, and one in six had raised blood pressure during a doctor’s visit.

Clip 2

Now, "raised" blood pressure isn’t "high" blood pressure, but it is blood pressure above the normal range for healthy kids, and with the amount of sodium kids are consuming, it’s a real cause for concern

Clip 3

That sodium isn’t coming from the salt shaker at the dinner table. It’s in food prepared at restaurants or in school cafeterias and in the ready-to-eat, packaged food that comes from the grocery store.

Clip 4

Here’s where you can really make a difference. At the grocery store, read the Nutrition Facts labels and choose the lowest sodium option.

Clip 5

Tell your grocery store manager you’d like more low sodium options of your family’s favorite foods, and when they make it to the shelf, buy them. When you’re eating out, ask for nutrition information and look it over with your children. If you choose a lower-sodium option, chances are that your children will, too.

Clip 6

Now, less salt doesn’t mean less flavor. Herbs, spices, and even citrus can help season any dish. And the good news is, it doesn’t take long for our taste buds to adjust to less salt.

Clip 7

CDC is working with the food industry to reduce sodium in food and drink products. And we’re also working with schools and school districts as they implement changes to serve healthier food in school meals and vending machines.

Clip 8

There’s no better time than today to make the choice to eat better an easy choice for your children. The benefits will really add up over their lifetimes and it won’t add to their weight and their blood pressure!

Opioid Painkillers

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

This month’s Vital Signs focuses on our nation’s prescription drug overdose epidemic.

Clip 2

Every single day, 46 Americans die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers such as Vicodin, OxyContin, or methadone. These drugs are commonly prescribed in every community. Health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid painkillers in 2012, enough for every single adult in the country to have a bottle of pills.

Clip 3

Where you live makes a difference in whether your doctor is likely to give you one of these prescriptions. Health care providers in some states write almost three times as many opioid painkiller prescriptions per person as doctors in other states. That doesn’t make sense. Health issues that cause pain don't vary much from state-to-state and these drugs are dangerous drugs.

Clip 4

Cities and states across our country have taken steps to improve opioid prescribing practices. These steps include regulating pain clinics and instituting sensible opioid prescribing guidelines.

Clip 5

Another promising solution is getting data from state-based prescription drug monitoring programs out to prescribers in real time. The goal of these programs is to ensure that patients have access to safe, effective pain treatment, but also provide prescribers with the real-time information they need about their patients to prevent dangerous use of drugs that can be dangerous.

Clip 6

Florida has reversed its overdose trend. After statewide legislative and enforcement actions in 2010 and 2011, painkiller prescribing declined, and the death rate from prescription drug overdoses declined in parallel. In fact, it declined by nearly a quarter in just two years.

Clip 7

Leadership makes a difference, and that has to come from state health departments, state governments, medical boards, medical societies, policy makers, and governors.

Clip 8

A surge in painkiller prescribing has been the main driving force of this epidemic and of the heroin epidemic. Good prescribing practices can help reverse this epidemic.

Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

This month’s Vital Signs focuses on preventing norovirus outbreaks from contaminated food.

Clip 2

Norovirus is highly contagious, hard to stop, and causes severe vomiting and diarrhea.

Clip 3

Each year, about 20 million people in the U.S. get infected and sick from norovirus, most from close contact with infected people or from contaminated food.

Clip 4

Norovirus infections are sometimes called “food poisoning,” but norovirus only comes from people, so infected food service workers can contaminate your food while preparing it.

Clip 5

The food service industry has an important role to play in prevention. Businesses can establish policies that require food workers to stay home when they’re sick and for two days after their symptoms stop.  They can encourage this by offering paid sick leave and having a list of on-call workers.

Clip 6

Kitchen managers should be certified in food safety and make sure food safety practices are followed. Two of the most important steps are to wash hands properly and to use utensils and disposable gloves to keep from touching ready-to-eat foods with bare hands. No bare hand contact with food is a simple concept that’s important to implement. These are common sense steps that can help prevent this common infection and make eating out safer for all of us.

Teen Pregnancy

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

This month’s Vital Signs focuses on teen pregnancy.

Clip 2

We’ve made progress. Over the past 20 years, the number of births to teen mothers has decreased. But never the less, in 2012, the last year for which we have complete data, more than 300,000 15- to 19-year olds gave birth. One out of four of those mothers was between 15 and 17 years old.

Clip 3

Teen pregnancy is a real problem. It contributes to and perpetuates the cycle of poverty.

Clip 4

Doctors, nurses, and other health care providers can provide the facts and counsel sexually active young women, helping them consider the most effective reversible methods of birth control, such as IUDs and long-acting implants. We can provide this information in a manner that is both factual and respectful.

Clip 5

Young men and young women share responsibility to avoid teen pregnancy. Let’s support our teens so they delay having sex until they’re older.

Clip 6

It’s good news that the rate of teen pregnancy is decreasing.

Clip 7

Let’s help teens take control over their future.

Prescribing Practices and Healthcare Associated Infections

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

CDC works 24/7 to save lives and protect people. 
This month’s Vital Signs focuses on how antibiotics are prescribed in Americas hospitals.

Clip 2

Antibiotics can save lives, but when they're not prescribed correctly they put patients at risk for preventable allergic reactions, resistant infections, and deadly diarrhea and they become less likely to work in the future.

Clip 3

So that patients receive the safest care possible, CDC recommends that every hospital adopt an antibiotic stewardship program with seven basic elements.

Clip 4

First, leadership commitment. Dedicate the necessary human, financial, and IT resources.

Clip 5

Second, accountability. Appoint a single leader responsible for program outcomes. Physicians have proven successful in this role.

Clip 6

Third, drug expertise. Appoint a single pharmacist leader to support improved prescribing.

Clip 7

Fourth, action. Take at least one action to improve prescribing.  For example implement a universal reassessment within 48 hours to double check drug choice, dose, and duration.

Clip 8

Fifth, track. Monitor antibiotic prescribing and resistance patterns.

Clip 9

Sixth, report. Regularly report to staff on antibiotic prescribing and resistance information and on what can be done to improve.

Clip 10

Seventh and last, offer education about antibiotic resistance and best prescribing practices.

Clip 11

As patients we have important roles to play as well. Ask whether tests will be done to make sure the right antibiotic is prescribed. Make sure everyone washes their hands before they touch you, and, if you have a catheter, ask everyday if it's still really necessary.

Clip 12

Antibiotics are precious, but they're increasingly endangered. Patients, physicians, and health care systems all have a role to play protecting antibiotics for ourselves and for our children.

Motor Vehicle Safety

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

CDC works 24/7 to save lives and protect people. This month's Vital Signs focuses on motor vehicle safety for the youngest Americans.

Clip 2

In the past ten years, more than 9,000 children 12 and under died in motor vehicle crashes in the U.S. One third of those who died weren't buckled up. Although crash deaths have gone down in the past decade, they remain the leading cause of death for children.

Clip 3

Many of these deaths can be prevented by doing what we all know is safest. Buckling up is the best way to keep our children safe.

Clip 4

We can all set a good example by using a seat belt ourselves, on every trip, no matter how short.

Clip 5

Health care providers can help by staying up-to-date on child passenger safety guidelines and counseling parents on using age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts on every trip.

Clip 6

States and communities can help by offering car seat and booster seat give-away programs that include education, and increasing the required age for car seat and booster seat use.

Clip 7

Buckling up properly saves lives.

Clip 8

No trip is too short. Buckle every person. Every seat. Every trip.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

This month’s Vital Signs reports that about 23 million adults ages 50 to 75 haven’t gotten the life-saving tests they need to find colon cancer early.

Clip 2

This is really important. Every year, more than 50 thousand Americans die from colorectal cancer, and yet, testing could have prevented most of those deaths.

Clip 3

Testing can find precancerous growths, called polyps, so they can be removed before they turn into cancer.

Clip 4

Testing also helps find colorectal cancer at an early stage, when treatment can lead to cure.

Clip 5

If you’re 50 or over, get tested. If you’re younger than 50 and have a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps or other risk factors, talk with your doctor about getting tested.

Clip 6

The Affordable Care Act requires insurance coverage of all colorectal cancer testing at no cost, and that’s great for you.

Clip 7

There’re different types of screening tests. Talk with your doctor about which one is right for you.

Clip 8

The best test is the test that gets done.

Untreatable: Today’s Drug-Resistant Health Threats

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

This report shows that many bacteria are really making dangerous advances against antibiotics. We look at bacteria that have the biggest impact on human life. These include CRE. I’ve called CRE a nightmare bacteria. It can resist all antibiotics, kill a high proportion of people it infects, and spread from person-to-person and bacteria-to-bacteria readily.

Clip 2

Antibiotic resistance is one of the most serious health threats we face today. We risk entering a post-antibiotic era where even simple infections can be deadly. With a few bacteria, we’re already there. But we’re sounding this alarm because, as serious as the threat is, if we take quick, aggressive action, we can stop it.

Clip 3

There are four things we have to do to protect antibiotics. First, prevent infections and the spread of drug-resistant bacteria. Second, use antibiotics much more responsibly. Third, track resistance patterns. And fourth, develop new drugs.

Clip 4

With real commitment on the part of everyone who uses antibiotics—doctors, patients, and those in the agriculture industry—we can stop the threat of antibiotic resistance.

Results from 2012 Tips From Former Smokers campaign

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

In 2012, CDC’s Tips from Former Smokers media campaign, made possible by the Prevention Fund of the Affordable Care Act, pulled back the curtain and we showed Americans the tragedies that we, as health care professionals, see day in and day out.

Clip 2

After they saw the ads, millions of nonsmokers talked to friends and families about the dangers of smoking and referred them to programs that could help them quit and could save their lives.

Clip 3

The impact of this ad campaign is further proof that sustained, hard-hitting media campaigns, such as Tips, save lives.

Clip 4

It’s really a David and Goliath fight, and in this case, I’m happy to say that David is winning, and because of that, more and more smokers are quitting, fewer kids are starting to smoke, and Americans are going to live longer and healthier lives.

Avoidable Deaths from Heart Disease, Stroke, and Hypertensive Disease

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

One out of every three deaths in this country is from cardiovascular disease. As a doctor, I find this number heartbreaking, especially because research clearly shows that we could prevent so many of these deaths.

Clip 2

A large proportion of heart attacks and strokes simply don’t have to happen. Reducing smoking, controlling blood pressure, managing cholesterol can prolong life for literally millions of people and do so in a way that’s healthy and productive.

Clip 3

Doctors should track patient progress on the ABCS of heart health: aspirin when appropriate, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, and smoking cessation.

Clip 4

Communities can provide tobacco-free areas, safe places to walk, and access to healthy food options.

Clip 5

Even a single preventable death from heart disease or stroke is one too many. Working together, we can save more than 200,000 lives every year.

Obesity Rates among Preschoolers

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

It looks as if childhood obesity rates have begun to decrease in many states among our nation’s low-income preschoolers.

Clip 2

The federal WIC program has improved nutritional standards, and communities across the nation are taking action—increasing breastfeeding rates, improving nutrition and physical activity in child care, making it easier for families to buy healthy food, and providing free, safe drinking water in parks and recreational areas. These are just a few things that are proven to work, but still, one in eight preschoolers is obese, and that’s far too many.

Clip 3

Obese children are much more likely to become obese as adults and have lifelong physical and mental health problems.

Clip 4

Every community can work to make the healthy choice the easy choice so that our nation’s children grow up and thrive.

Prescription Drug Overdoses Among Women

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

In 2010 more than 6,600 women died from prescription pain killers, four times as many as died from cocaine and heroin combined.

Clip 2

Prescription opiate overdose is a growing and under recognized risk for women in the United States.

Clip 3

Health care providers, policy makers and people in our communities can work together so patients who need prescription medicines can get them safely and use them appropriately.

Clip 4

Stopping this epidemic in women and men is everybody’s business. Doctors need to be cautious about prescribing and patients about using these drugs. Together we can turn this epidemic around.

HPV

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

This CDC report shows that HPV vaccine works, and it works well. The report should be a wake-up call to our nation. We have to protect the next generation of young women from cervical cancer. We need to provide full HPV vaccination.

Clip 2

The results of this study are striking, and they're encouraging. HPV infections that can be prevented by vaccine decreased more than half after just four years of the vaccination program.

Clip 3

Unfortunately, only one third of girls age 13 to 17, our daughters, sisters, and nieces, have received the full HPV vaccination series.

Clip 4

Our low vaccination rates mean that 50,000 preventable tragedies will occur. Fifty thousand girls alive today will develop cervical cancer that could have been prevented if we get our vaccination rates up.

Clip 5

For every year that we fail to increase our vaccination rates, another 4,400 women will develop cervical cancer. That's tragic, it's unacceptable, and we can stop it by increasing HPV vaccination rates.

Clip 6

CDC works 24/7 to save lives and protect people, and today we release striking data showing, again, that vaccination is key to saving lives.

Clip 7

There are a lot of misconceptions about HPV vaccination. Some parents think they don't want to get their daughters vaccinated because they're not yet sexually active. Well, we don't wait until people are exposed to an infection to protect them, we protect them well in advance. We don't wait until a kid gets exposed to measles to vaccinate them against measles. Vaccination against HPV is so important, it prevents cancer. Don't wait. Get your kids vaccinated on time.

Listeria

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Listeria is sneaky. And it can hide in soft cheese, cantaloupe, sprouts - foods that aren’t usually cooked to kill the germs.

Clip 2

Transcript: Listeria can also be deadly. As many as one in five people infected with Listeria die from it. Pregnant women, newborns, young children, people over 65, and those with weakened immune systems are especially vulnerable.

Clip 3

Transcript: We need to put new, cutting-edge technologies to work in order to detect outbreaks more quickly, prevent them better, and save more lives.

Clip 4

Protect yourself and your family. If you’re pregnant, over 65, or your immune system is weakened, avoid foods, such as soft cheese, that may have Listeria in them. Keeping food safe, from the farm to the table, is everybody’s business.

New MRSA Study

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcript: This week, we announced a major new finding. We have figured out a way to save tens of thousands of lives with a simple solution. You see, there are around 100,000 people a year who die because of infections they catch in hospitals.

Clip 2

Transcript: Most of those infections could be prevented. One of the more serious of them is something called MRSA. We studied 74,000 patients and we found a simple solution that can save lives.

Clip 3

Transcript: If hospitals do just two things differently - first, wash patients with a different soap, and second, use an antibiotic ointment that can cut deadly infections by MRSA and other dangerous germs by nearly half.

Clip 4

Transcript: In the past decade, many of our country’s biggest breakthroughs in preventing deadly infections in hospitals and other health care settings have come from the great work of the scientists here at CDC. We work 24/7 to find ways to protect you and your loved ones.

“Talk With Your Doctor” campaign

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcript: CDC works 24-7 to save lives and protect people. This month, we worked with national and state partners to help smokers quit and remind them that their doctor can help.

Clip 2

Transcript: Two-thirds of tobacco users want to quit, but fewer than one in ten succeed each year.

Clip 3

Transcript: Medications and brief advice from doctors can double or triple the odds that a smoker will quit for good.

Clip 4

Transcript: From doctors to pharmacists, from physician assistants to nurses, all health care providers need to play a critical role helping tobacco users quit.

Clip 5

Transcript: Talking with your patients about tobacco use has never been easier. The CDC website has a special section for health care providers on helping patients quit.

Hepatitis C

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcript: Hepatitis C is a serious infection. It’s a leading cause of liver cancer, but most people with hepatitis C don’t have symptoms and they don’t know they’re infected.

Clip 2

Transcript: There are about three million Americans with hepatitis C. Most of them are baby boomers, born between the years of 1945 and 1965.

Clip 3

Transcript: New, more effective treatment for hepatitis C is now available. Treatment can prevent liver cancer and prevent death from liver disease.

Clip 4

Transcript: At CDC, we recommend that everyone born from 1945 through 1965 be tested at least once for hepatitis C. It’s a simple blood test that can tell if you’ve been infected.

Clip 5

Transcript: Data analyzed at CDC suggests that as few as half of people with a positive hepatitis C test get recommended follow-up testing. The follow-up test is essential. It’s the only way to know if someone’s still infected with the virus. With follow-up testing, people who need it can get lifesaving medical care.

CDC Laboratory Works on H7N9

Transcript: This virus is very interesting for us because it's causing such different symptoms in birds and humans. Since this is causing no symptoms in the birds it's flying under the radar screen so to speak. Which means that it might be more wide spread than we realize. That's one of the major concerns for the Americas because it's not here, it's not established in our birds. The Chinese released sequences for the first four human cases very quickly. There's a lot you can learn just from getting the sequence information that can lead you on to other experiments and possibly field studies to try to confirm the suspicions you develop from the sequences. We know a lot about the virus just from the sequence but it's also got some changes we don't really understand yet. Which tells us there's still a lot to learn about this virus. So, we have to actually work with it in the laboratory to figure these things out. This one is showing a lot more human cases early on. H7 compared to H5. Since everybody is experienced with having to change the vaccine composition for seasonal influenza every year, we know that influenza viruses can change. That's something we have to be aware of we have to see that we have a vaccine that works against what's in the population at the time. We're doing as much as we can and our people are working very hard and they know what they're doing. They're producing results at an amazing speed.

SARS

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcript: Ten years ago a global outbreak of SARs emerged. In six months SARs killed hundreds of people and cost tens of billions of dollars.

Clip 2

Transcript: A decade after the SARs epidemic we’ve made progress but we remain at risk from global health threats.

Clip 3

Transcript: We face a perfect storm of vulnerability. Emerging microbes, resistant microbes that outsmart the drugs used to treat them. Globalization of travel and trade and the greater ease of making deadly organisms in a laboratory place us at greater risk than ever before.

Clip 4

Transcript: We have a unique window of opportunity. The world is committed to reducing threats to health and we have new technologies that can take many important disease threats off the table, if we act now.

Advanced Molecular Detection

Clip 1

Transcript: CDC is on the lookout 24/7 for threats from new or drug resistant microbes. Every day global travel and trade bring new health risks right to our door. CDC needs new molecular diagnostics to better protect Americans.

Clip 2

Transcript: To protect Americans, CDC needs next generation diagnostics to find and stop killer microbes before they spread. We need to crack their DNA code. Advanced computing allows us to take disease threats off the table if we act now.

Clip 3

Transcript: Our lives and our economic stability depend on CDC finding and responding effectively to disease threats.

Clip 4

Transcript: It used to take weeks to months in a room full of equipment to sequence a genome of a bacteria or virus. Today we can do that in just a few hours with equipment like this. It sequences a genome and allows us to figure out what it is, whether it's resistant, and whether it's part of an outbreak.

Tips From Former Smokers campaign

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. speaking on the “Tips From Former Smokers” campaign.

Clip 1

Transcript: The "Tips from Former Smokers" campaign shows real people, not actors, dealing with the terrible effects of smoking. As a doctor it's heartbreaking to see patients suffer and die from preventable illness. The "Tips" campaign pulls back the curtain and shows people the tragedies that health professionals see every day.

Clip 2

Transcript: Big Tobacco continues to spend a million dollars an hour every day of the year to portray smoking as vibrant and healthy. CDC's educational campaign shows the reality. Smokers face illness, disability, disfigurement, and death as a result of their tobacco use.

Clip 3

Transcript: Illnesses caused by tobacco are one hundred percent preventable.  There's no reason for anyone to be sick, disfigured, or die from tobacco use.

CRE

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcript: CDC works 24/7 to save lives and protect Americans from health threats. In this month's Vital Signs, we're focusing on a health threat faced by the sickest patients in our country. People who are at risk of infections from antibiotic resistant bacteria called CRE.

Clip 2

Transcript: CRE kills about half of patients who get severe infections from them. And some CRE infections are untreatable by any antibiotic. We need doctors, nurses, other healthcare workers and people who lead health facilities to work together to take rapid action to stop CRE from spreading further now.

Clip 3

Transcript: CRE are spreading; more and more patients are at risk of serious infection and death. Although we don't know what the future will bring, we may have a short window of opportunity to take action. If we miss this window of opportunity the deadly bacteria CRE could spread much more widely.

Clip 4

Transcript: CRE could be the beginning of the end of antibiotics for some bacteria. Doctors need to prescribe antibiotics very carefully to preserve these lifesaving drugs for as long as possible.

HIV

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcript: CDC is doing a lot to fight HIV.  We're a driving force in implementation of the goals of the national HIV/AIDS strategy and globally, we and our partners are expanding programs under the president’s emergency plan for AIDS relief, PEPFAR. We're increasing the number of people getting treatment from four to six million by the end of this year.

Clip 2

Transcript: PEPFAR programs are making a real difference.  They've saved millions of lives and last year alone prevented more than 200 thousand infants from becoming infected with HIV.

Clip 3

Transcript: Our goal of creating an AIDS-free generation that lives in a world of health and economic security is within reach.  But only if we persevere and keep doing what we know works.

Clip 4

Transcript: In the US we've changed the way we do HIV prevention. We're investing in what works, in the places that need it most and for the people that need it most.

Flu

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcipt: This year, flu has hit early and it has hit hard. And it’s likely to continue for about another month or so before it really tapers off.

Clip 2

Transcript: The best way to protect your-self against the flu is with a flu shot. In fact, even though the flu shot is far from perfect, it’s by far the best tool we have to protect against the flu.

Clip 3

Transcript: While there is still flu vaccine out there, you may have to call around to your provider or pharmacy to make sure that they have it before you get a vaccination.

Clip 4

Transcript: If you have symptoms of flu- fever, chills, cough – even if you’ve had a flu shot, it’s important to get checked out in two situations. First, if you’re severely ill and having trouble breathing, and second, if you have an underlying health problem such as diabetes. People with those conditions should see a doctor promptly, because treatment in the first 48 hours can greatly reduce your chances of becoming severely ill.

Healthcare-associated infections

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. speaking on the 2011 National and State Healthcare-Associated Infections Standardized Infection Ratio Report.

Clip 1

Transcript: This week, we at CDC are reporting big reductions in some healthcare-associated infections. This means lives saved and money saved.

Clip 2

Transcript: Each and every year in the US about a million people get infections while receiving health care. These not only cause preventable illness and death but they cost billions of dollars.

Clip 3

Transcript: There're still far too many healthcare-associated infections. We have to do more to better protect patients.

Clip 4

Transcript: Today virtually every single hospital and dialysis center in this county is using CDC's National Healthcare Safety Network. When you know where infections are occurring, you can do more to prevent them.

Clip 5

Transcript: Preventing health care associated infections is the responsibility of every health care provider and every health care system, everywhere patients receive care.

Million Hearts Initiative

These Spanish broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. speaking on the Million Hearts Initiative.

Polio

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.

Clip 1

Transcript: In 2012 there were fewer cases of polio in fewer countries than ever before in history. We were down to about 222 cases. That was a decline from more than 600 the previous year and from 350,000 when the CDC and our partners started this campaign in 1988.

Clip 2

Transcript: The finish line for polio eradication is in sight. The last mile is always the hardest. But I’m confident that we will eradicate polio. When we do so, it will be a gift to every child ever born to humanity for evermore.

Clip 3

Transcript: Eradication is the ultimate in both equity and sustainability, because it’s for everyone and for always.

Clip 4

Transcript: The progress we’re making against polio is a reflection of a wonderful partnership.  Groups including Rotary International,  The Gates Foundation,  the World Health Organization,  UNICEF, governments around the world,  and, most importantly,  the people on the front line going house to house and making sure that every last child gets vaccinated are going to end this disease once and for all.

Clip 5

Transcript: We’ve made so much progress on polio because we have a great technical package. We track where the infections are and we make sure that vaccination gets to every last child. That’s what will get us over the finish line.

Clip 6

Transcript: We are so close to the finish line on polio eradication. If we drop the ball now, we’re going to have to start all over again at tremendous cost – economically, and even more importantly, to the health of our children around the world.

Smoking & Mental Illness

These broadcast quality clips feature CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. speaking on Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Mental Illness — United States, 2009–2011.

Clip 1

Transcript: Although cigarette smoking has declined, it remains the leading preventable cause of death in this country. In this month's Vital Signs, we report that 1 in 3 people with mental illness in this country smoke. And yet people with mental illness, like others in this country, want to quit and can quit.

Clip 2

Transcript: People with mental illness who smoke, like other people who smoke, want to quit and can quit. Treatments to help stop smoking work, but they're not used enough.

Clip 3

Transcript: Health care providers and mental health care providers can save lives by helping smokers quit, particularly smokers who have mental illness.

Clip 4

Transcript: By helping people with mental illness quit smoking, you can improve not only their physical health, but their mental health as well.

CDC Expert Video Commentary Series on Medscape

CDC is partnering with Medscape to present the CDC Expert Video Commentary Series designed to provide updated information and guidance to Medscape’s physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. The series will focus on current topics important to all practicing clinicians. » learn more

 
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