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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

1.Self-Reported Hypertension and Use of Antihypertensive Medication Among Adults — United States, 2005–2009

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Results from this report can be used by state public health partners to be aware of state-specific levels self-reported hypertension and antihypertensive medication use among hypertensive adults. This report provides the most recent trends on state-level hypertension awareness and treatment among U.S. adults. Overall age-adjusted prevalence of self-reported hypertension increased 9.7 percent from 25.8 percent to 28.3 percent from 2005 to 2009.  There were large disparities of self-reported hypertension by age, sex, race/ethnicity, levels of education and state. Self-reported hypertension was significantly higher among elderly, men, non-Hispanic blacks, and those with less than high school education compared to younger populations, women, non-Hispanic Asians and those with higher levels of education.  By state, age-adjusted prevalence ranged from 20.9 percent in Minnesota to 35.9 percent in Mississippi in 2009. Among those with self-reported hypertension, 62.3 percent (2009) used antihypertensive medications. The percentage of using antihypertensive medication was highest in Tennessee (74.1 percent) and lowest in California (52.3 percent).

2. Blood Lead Levels in Children Aged 1–5 Years — United States, 1999–2010

CDC
Division of News & Electronic Media
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Though the number of children with elevated blood lead levels has declined dramatically over the last four decades, there remains an estimated 535,000 (2.6 percent) of U. S. children ages 1-5 years with blood lead levels (BLLs) greater than or equal to the reference value of 5 micrograms per deciliter. This report details the first analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data to define children’s blood lead levels greater than or equal to 5 micrograms per deciliter as “high”. Persistent differences between the mean BLLs of different racial/ethnic and income groups can be traced to differences in housing quality, environmental conditions, nutrition, and other factors.  An estimated 535,000 U. S. children ages 1-5 years with blood lead levels greater than or equal to CDC’s current reference value of 5 micrograms per deciliter. Lead poisoning prevention resources should be targeted to areas and communities where children are most at risk. CDC reminds parents that lead poisoning is entirely preventable and that simple steps can be taken make homes more lead-safe.

Background: In 2012, CDC, based on recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP), eliminated the use of the term “blood lead level of concern” and now uses a reference value based on the 97.5th percentile of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)’s blood lead distribution in children (currently 5 micrograms per deciliter) to identify children with elevated blood lead levels. 

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