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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

1. HIV Infection Among Hispanics or Latinos — 46 States and Puerto Rico, 2010

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According to a new CDC analysis, the HIV epidemic among Hispanics/ Latinos differs by region in the United States and when compared to Puerto Rico. The new report shows that in 2010, the rate of HIV diagnoses among Hispanics/Latinos in the Northeast (55.0 per 100,000 persons) was more than twice that of any other region in the United States, while the largest percentage of HIV diagnoses among Hispanics/Latinos occurred in the South (35.4 percent). Using HIV surveillance data from 46 U.S. states and Puerto Rico, researchers analyzed HIV diagnoses among Hispanics/Latinos by region as well as by sex, age group, transmission category, residence at diagnosis and place of birth. The study found that although male-to-male sexual contact was the primary mode of HIV transmission among Hispanics/Latinos overall, those living in the Northeast were more likely to have been infected through intravenous drug use (IDU) when compared to other regions. Hispanics/Latinos in the Northeast were also more likely to be of Puerto Rican descent, while those in other regions were more likely to be of Mexican or Central American descent. When compared to the United States, Hispanics/Latinos diagnosed with HIV in Puerto Rico were more likely to have contracted the virus through IDU or heterosexual contact. Authors note that these regional differences require HIV testing, prevention and treatment efforts tailored to the differing needs of these communities.

2. Evaluation of Vaccination Recall Letter System for Medicaid-Enrolled Children Aged 19–23 Months — Montana, 2011

CDC
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Vaccine providers should use recall systems to increase the number of children who are fully vaccinated. However, vaccine providers should also evaluate their recall system to determine its effectiveness and adjust their recall strategy, if necessary. Montana ranks among the states with the lowest childhood vaccination rates. In an effort to increase the number of fully vaccinated toddlers, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services sent letters to the parents of toddlers enrolled in Montana Medicaid who had not received each of the nationally recommended vaccines. These letters, called “recall letters”, often lead to more children becoming fully vaccinated. However, in this instance, the recall letters were not effective at increasing the number fully vaccinated toddlers.

3. Use of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine for Adults with Immunocompromising Conditions: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

CDC
Division of News & Electronic Media
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The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recommended a second vaccine be used to prevent pneumococcal disease in immunocompromised adults. Along with the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (Pneumovax 23) that has been recommended since 1983, eligible adults should now also receive 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar 13). The addition of the second vaccine, which has routinely been used in infants and was recently licensed for adults, should provide strong protection while maintaining broad serotype coverage for this population with a high burden of pneumococcal disease.

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