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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

1. Characteristics of Bullying Among Middle School and High School Students — Massachusetts, 2009

Julia Hurley
Massachusetts Department of Public Health
(617) 624-5006

This is the first state-specific report on a broad array of health risks associated with bullying among middle and high school students. Middle and high school students who are bullies, victims of bullies, or both victims and perpetrators of bullying (bully-victims) are more likely to report considering suicide, intentionally injuring self (non-suicide attempt), being physically hurt by a family member, and witnessing violence in their family than students uninvolved in bullying. Of the 5,807 middle and high school students surveyed from 138 MA public schools, more middle school students (44.0 percent) than high school students (30.5 percent) were involved in bullying. The health and family environment for students involved in bullying are substantially worse than for those who are not involved in bullying. The results underscore the importance of primary prevention programs, as well as comprehensive programs and strategies that involve families.

2. State Smoke-Free Laws for Worksites, Restaurants, and Bars — United States, 2000–2010

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

This report summarizes the changes in state smoking restrictions for private-sector worksites, restaurants, and bars that occurred from December 31, 2000 to December 31, 2010. Secondhand smoke exposure causes lung cancer and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in nonsmoking adults and children, resulting in an estimated 46,000 heart disease deaths and 3,400 lung cancer deaths among U.S. nonsmoking adults each year. Smoke-free laws that prohibit smoking in all indoor spaces fully protect nonsmokers from involuntary exposure to secondhand smoke indoors. The number of states (including D.C.) with laws that prohibit smoking in indoor areas of worksites, restaurants, and bars increased from zero in 2000 to 26 in 2010. However, regional disparities remain in policy adoption; no southern state has adopted a smoke-free law that prohibits smoking in all three venues. The entire nation can have comprehensive smoke-free state laws in place by 2020 if smoke-free activity is sustained nationally and intensified in certain regions, particularly the South.

3. Grand Rounds: Challenges of Global Malaria Eradication

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

Malaria is a major public health problem. Worldwide, approximately 3 billion persons per year are at risk for contracting this mosquito-borne disease, which caused an estimated 781,000 deaths in 2009. Recent years have brought renewed optimism for malaria control through unprecedented funding, improved interventions for prevention, diagnosis and treatment, and committed global partnerships. The effect of these efforts is starting to be seen in fewer malaria cases and decreased child mortality in certain malaria endemic countries, though much work remains to be done. In order to eliminate malaria from endemic countries and eventually achieve global malaria eradication, partners must build on lessons learned from initial successes, invest in research for novel control strategies, and plan for a prolonged commitment to this effort.

 

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