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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

MMWR News Synopsis for September 16, 2010

  1. Balamuthia mandrillaris Transmitted Through Organ Transplantation — Mississippi, 2009
  2. National, State, and Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19–35 Months — United States, 2009
  3. Grand Rounds: Radiologic and Nuclear Preparedness

There is a MMWR telebriefing scheduled for September 16, 2010 at 11:00am ET regarding the National Immunization Survey (NIS) results article.

1. Balamuthia mandrillaris Transmitted Through Organ Transplantation — Mississippi, 2009

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

CDC reports the first known transmission of a rare brain infection, Balamuthia granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE), through organ transplantation. The organ donor died of encephalitis that was initially thought to be non-transmissible. Among the four recipients of organs from this donor, two became ill with one dying and the two other recipients remain well. These cases illustrate the risk of transmitting undetected infections via organ transplantation, especially when the cause of death in the organ donor is not clearly defined. Physicians and transplant centers should be aware of the possibility of undetected infections (such as GAE) in potential organ donors, and should avoid using organs from potential donors who die of encephalitis of uncertain origin. Organ procurement organizations should carefully consider the medical suitability of potential organ donors with encephalitis of uncertain etiology. Furthermore, transplant centers should avoid transplantation of organs from these donors, whose organs might pose an elevated risk for fatal infection in recipients.

2. National, State, and Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19–35 Months — United States, 2009

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

Immunization coverage of U.S. toddlers remains high for most routine vaccines remaining at or over 90 percent. Coverage levels for newly recommended vaccines increased in 2009 including the birth dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine (from 55.3 percent to 60.8 percent) and the Hepatitis A vaccine (from 40.4 percent to 46.6 percent). Full coverage for rotavirus, another newly recommended vaccine, was 43.9 percent among children born within 2 years of the vaccine's licensure. Full coverage for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (≥4 doses), first recommended in 2000, has now reached levels comparable to those for other longer-standing recommended vaccines that also require 4 doses for completion (80.4 percent). Continued partnerships among national, state, local, private, and public entities are needed to ensure that levels for the more recently recommended vaccines continue to increase. Maintaining these high levels and achieving high levels for the more recent vaccines is important to reduce the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States.

3. Grand Rounds: Radiologic and Nuclear Preparedness

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

Radiological and nuclear disasters are infrequent, but when they occur, they result in large and demonstrable health burdens. Both past radiological and nuclear events and possible scenarios demonstrate that 1) radiological incidents can happen at any time and any place, 2) state and local health agencies are involved in the incident response and communication concerning health effects of radiation, 3) communication needs arise even when there is no public risk, 4) responses require coordination with multiple agencies, and 5) planning requires multiagency input. Public health authorities at all levels must understand the extent of their responsibilities in radiological emergencies, they must prioritize emergency response planning, capabilities and capacities appropriately, and most critically, they must integrate radiological and nuclear preparedness and response into the overall public health all-hazard preparedness and response.

 

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