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MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

1. State-Specific Trends in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Among Adults — United States, 2000–2009

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

In 2009, 67.5 percent of adults ate less than two fruits daily and 73.7 percent ate less than three vegetables daily, far short of national health objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption. Healthy People 2010 fruit and vegetable objectives aim for 75 percent of Americans to eat at least 2 servings of fruit daily and 50 percent to eat at least 3 servings of vegetables daily. None of the 50 states met these objectives. A diet high in fruit and vegetable intake plays a key role in weight management and reduces the risk of leading causes of death –heart disease, some cancers, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases, and diabetes. Despite efforts to increase healthy eating, over the last decade there has been a two percent decrease nationwide in the fruit consumption objective; there has been no change in the vegetable consumption objective. Only one state increased in both objectives, while ten states decreased in both objectives. More efforts are needed at the national, state, and local levels to improve environments and policies related to fruit and vegetable access, availability, and affordability.

2. Impact on Parents of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Child Care and School Closures — United States, 2009

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

A national sample of parents that experienced short-term school and child care center dismissals related to 2009 influenza A (H1N1) generally supported the closures and reported few adverse effects from them. During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, child care center and school dismissals were common. To learn more about parents' experiences during school dismissals related to H1N1, CDC and the Harvard Opinion Research Program conducted a randomized telephone poll of 523 parents whose child care center or school closed during the fall of 2009. Overall, parents reported few adverse effects related to dismissals. Only 3 percent of respondents said dismissal was a major problem, and 75 percent reported that it was not a problem. Approximately 20 percent of parents reported that an adult in the household missed work because of the dismissal, and 19 percent had a child who missed a free or reduced-cost lunch, but only 2 percent and <1 percent said these were major problems respectively.

3. Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years — United States, 2009

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

Previously released

4. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers' Exposure to Secondhand Smoke — United States, 1999–2008

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
(404) 639-3286

Previously released

 

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