Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

MMWR – Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

1. West Nile Virus Activity – United States, 2009

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
Phone: (404) 639-3286

Because WNV continues to produce serious and sometimes life-threatening illness in substantial numbers of persons, the need persists for ongoing surveillance, mosquito control, and promotion of personal protection from mosquito bites, particularly in high risk groups such as the elderly. This report summarizes national West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance data for 2009. A total of 720 cases of WNV disease were reported, including 386 (54 percent) cases of WNV neuroinvasive disease. Overall, the incidence of WNV neuroinvasive disease was 0.13 per 100,000 population, the lowest recorded since 2001. Despite declining disease incidence, more than 11,000 WNV neuroinvasive and nonneuroinvasive disease cases are estimated to have occurred in 2009. States with the highest incidence included Mississippi (1.05 per 100,000), South Dakota (0.74), Wyoming (0.73), Colorado (0.72), and Nebraska (0.61). As seen in previous years, neuroinvasive disease incidence increased with increasing age, with the highest incidence among persons aged ≥70 years.

2. Vaccinia Virus Infection After Sexual Contact with a Military Smallpox Vaccinee – Washington, 2010

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
Phone: (404) 639-3286

Vaccinia virus infections can be serious and should be considered in persons with unexplained lesions that might represent vaccinia infection from contact transmission. This report describes a case of contact transmission of vaccinia virus from sexual contact with a member of the military who had been vaccinated against smallpox. Despite the patient's exposure history and clinical presentation, the diagnosis was not considered by the patient's physician initially. No additional cases of contact transmission were reported. Healthcare providers caring for U.S. military personnel or their contacts should consider vaccinia virus infection in the differential diagnosis of clinically compatible genital lesions. Health-care providers should educate vaccinees and any contacts with unexplained lesions about methods to prevent transmission and inadvertent autoinoculation.

3. Hepatitis A Vaccination Coverage Among U.S. Children Aged 12–23 Months – Immunization Information System Sentinel Sites, 2006–2009

CDC Division of News and Electronic Media
Phone: (404) 639-3286

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months. After the 2006 Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices' recommendations for routine hepatitis A vaccination of all children aged 12–23 months, ≥1 dose coverage among these children at eight Immunization Information System sites increased through quarter 1, 2007. Coverage plateaued from quarter 2, 2007 through 2009. Experience implementing hepatitis A vaccination among children has found significant community-wide decreases in disease incidence with even modest levels of vaccination coverage among children. Thus immunization programs and vaccine providers should encourage children to receive hepatitis A vaccine, beginning at age 12 months. Reminder/recall notification and school or child-care entry vaccination requirements might contribute to increased vaccination coverage. Continued monitoring is needed to assess the trend in completion of the hepatitis A vaccine series among children.

 

###
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives. Protecting People. Saving Money Through Prevention. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #