Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

MMWR

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

MMWR News Synopsis for December 3, 2009

  1. Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis in Hispanic Women – Indiana, 2006-2008
  2. Global Measles Mortality Reduction and the Risk for Resurgence, 2000-2008

There is no MMWR telebriefing scheduled for December 3, 2009.

1. Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis in Hispanic Women – Indiana, 2006-2008

Press Contact: CDC
Division of Media Relations 
(404) 636-3286

In the largest cluster of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) ever reported in the United States, all affected patients were young Hispanic women who experienced delays in receiving healthcare.  Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) is a very rare disease with symptoms similar to breast cancer. The cause is unknown. In the largest cluster of IGM ever reported in the United States, seven young Hispanic women in Indiana were diagnosed with IGM during 2006-2009. This is the first time that researchers have found a higher prevalence of IGM in a particular ethnic group (Hispanics) in the United States. All of the patients experienced delays in care, with an average of five months delay between symptom onset and diagnostic biopsy. In a CDC case-control study, significant risk factors were low education levels, positive tuberculin skin test results, and medication allergies. Recognizing barriers to prompt healthcare access might suggest outreach opportunities. 

2. Global Measles Mortality Reduction and the Risk for Resurgence, 2000-2008

Press Contact: CDC
Division of Media Relations 
(404) 636-3286

While strong progress toward the 90 percent measles mortality reduction goal has been made, achieving the goal depends on (1) India fully implementing the recommended measles mortality reduction strategies, and (2) securing financial support to sustaining measles control in the other 46 high-burden countries.  In a global public health success, measles deaths worldwide fell by 78 percent between 2000 and 2008, from an estimated 733 000 to 164 000.  However, since 2007, the reduction in measles mortality has begun to level off and funding support to the Measles Initiative for global measles mortality reduction has declined from $150 million annually to approximately $50 million.  In addition, India, the country with the most measles deaths, has not yet fully implemented measles mortality reduction strategies.  Global immunization experts express concern that the U.N. goal of a 90 percent reduction in measles deaths by 2010 (compared with 2000) might not be achieved and warn of a risk of resurgence in measles deaths if vaccination efforts are not sustained.

 

####

 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: December 3, 2009
  • Content source: Office of Enterprise Communication
  • Notice: Linking to a non-federal site does not constitute an endorsement by HHS, CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the site.
CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives. Protecting People. Saving Money Through Prevention. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO

A-Z Index

  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #