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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Japanese Encephalitis Among Three Travelers to Asia – United States and Asia, 2003-2008

Press Contact: Division of Media Relations
Phone: (404) 639-3286

Travelers to Japanese encephalitis (JE) endemic countries should be advised of the risks of JE disease and the importance of personal protective measures to reduce the risk of mosquito bites. For some travelers who will be in a high risk setting based on location, duration, season, and activities, JE vaccine may further reduce the risk of infection. The risk of JE for most travelers is very low, but varies by destination, duration, season, and activities. This report describes three recent JE cases among U.S. travelers to Asia. All were Asian immigrants or family members who returned to Asia to live or to visit relatives. Such travelers might be at increased risk for JE because of rural itineraries and lack of perceived risk. Travelers to Asia should be advised of the risks of JE and the importance of personal protective measures to reduce the risk of mosquito bites. For some travelers with high risk itineraries, JE vaccine may further reduce the risk. JE should be suspected in a patient with evidence of a neurologic infection who recently returned from Asia.

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Prevalence of Obesity among Adults – Untied States, 2006-2008

Press Contact: CDC, Division of Media Relations
Phone: (404) 639-3286

The racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults are significant at both national and state level. We analyzed the 2006−2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to identify racial/ethnic differences in obesity prevalence in U.S. adults. Non-Hispanic blacks had the highest obesity prevalence, followed by Hispanics, and non-Hispanic whites. Among non-Hispanic blacks, 40 states had an obesity prevalence of 30 percent or more, including 5 states with a prevalence of 40 percent or more. Among Hispanics, 11 states had an obesity prevalence of 30 percent or more. Among non-Hispanic whites, only one state had a prevalence of 30 percent or more. Greater prevalences of obesity for non-Hispanic blacks and whites were found in the Midwest and South. Among Hispanics lower prevalence was observed in the Northeast compared to other regions. Effective policy and environmental intervention strategies that promote healthy eating and active living are needed for all populations, especially those disproportionally impacted by obesity.

Tularemia in Human – Missouri, 2000-2007

Press Contact: CDC, Division of Media Relations
Phone: (404) 639-3286

The prevention of tularemia requires educating those at greatest risk. Individuals potentially exposed to ticks such as hikers, campers, and farmers should use of protective clothing, repellents containing DEET (N,N-dimethyl-meta-toluamide), and pesticides (e.g., permethrin) on clothing can help reduce the risk for exposure through tick and arthropod bites. Hunters and others who handle potentially infected animals should wear gloves to avoid introduction of the F. tularensis through cuts or abrasions, and game meat should always be cooked thoroughly. To reduce the risk for aerosol exposures, grassy areas should be surveyed before mowing and any dead animals removed. Persons facing potential occupational risks such as agricultural and laboratory workers should follow safe practice guidelines. Tularemia is an uncommon but potentially fatal zoonotic disease caused by the gram-negative coccobacillus Francisella tularensis. Approximately 40 percent of all tularemia cases reported to CDC each year occur in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri. To define the epidemiologic and clinical features of tularemia in Missouri, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (MDHSS) analyzed surveillance data and conducted a retrospective clinical chart review of cases that occurred during 2000–2007. The findings of this report are consistent with seasonal and age distributions of tularemia cases as observed in national surveillance. They also demonstrate a higher proportion of tick-associated cases than other studies of tularemia in this region and age-specific differences in diagnosed clinical form, which have not been documented previously.

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: July 16, 2009
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