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(Box) National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month — March 2008

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(770) 488-5131

No summary available

Use of Colorectal Cancer Tests — United States, 2002, 2004, and 2006

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(770) 488-5131

Overall use of colorectal cancer tests increased from 2002 to 2006; however, disparities in test use continue to persist. We need to continue to work to ensure that all adults have access to these life-saving tests. The percentage of U.S. adults age 50 and older who had a colorectal cancer test increased significantly from 53.9 percent in 2002 to 60.8 percent in 2006. While the use of colorectal cancer screening tests increased among all racial and ethnic groups studied, racial and ethnic minorities continued to have lower screening rates than Whites. In addition, rates continue to be lower among people without health insurance, with low income, and with less than a high school education.

Update: Revised Recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Regarding Administration of Combination MMRV Vaccine

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Preliminary findings suggest that about one additional febrile seizure would be expected to occur in the 7-10 day postvaccination period for every 2,000 children aged 12-23 months who receive MMRV vaccine, compared with MMR vaccine and varicella vaccine at the same visit. ACIP voted to no longer express a preference for MMRV vaccine over separate injections of MMR vaccine and varicella vaccine. On February 27, information was presented to CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the risk for febrile seizures among children aged 12-23 months after administration of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV vaccine: ProQuad®) vaccine. Preliminary findings from a CDC study showed a 2.3 higher risk for febrile seizures 7-10 days after administration of MMRV vaccine compared with measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine and varicella vaccine administered at the same visit. As a result, ACIP voted to no longer express preference for MMRV vaccine over separate injections of equivalent component vaccines (i.e., MMR vaccine and varicella vaccine). CDC, FDA, and ACIP continue to evaluate these preliminary findings and will communicate updates and implement further necessary actions based on this evaluation. Availability of MMRV vaccine is currently limited in the United States; MMRV vaccine is not expected to be widely available before 2009.

Nonoccupational Logging Fatalities — Vermont, 1997–2007

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The risks associated with nonoccupational logging can be minimized, and many nonoccupational logging fatalities are preventable. The majority of fatal injuries associated with occupational and nonoccupational logging are sustained by falling objects resulting from the cutting of standing or partially standing trees. Ideally, nonprofessionals should not participate in the tree-felling portion of a logging operation. Nonoccupational logging activity (e.g., cutting firewood, property cleanup, trimming limbs, and pruning and cutting trees among non-professionals) is common especially in rural settings. However, most of these activities are not regulated and do not require special training or a permit. As such, the level of experience, awareness of safety measures, and use of safety equipment among persons involved in nonoccupational logging is likely more varied than among those involved in occupational logging, for which occupational standards (e.g., training and use of safety equipment) are a requirement. Therefore, the risk for injury and death likely is greater among those involved in nonoccupational logging.

Progress Toward Measles Mortality Reduction and Elimination — Eastern Mediterranean Region, 1997–2007

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Countries in the EMR have met with success in reducing the estimated number of measles-related deaths by more than 75 percent since 2000; however much work remains to be done to achieve the goal of measles elimination in the region. Countries of the World Health Organization’s Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) have adopted in 1997 the goal to eliminate indigenous measles by 2010. Measles immunization and surveillance strategies have been developed and implemented to help achieve that goal, as well as to reduce the measles-associated mortality in the region in accordance with the goal set by the World Health Assembly in 2005 to achieve a 90 percent reduction in global measles-associated mortality by 2010 compared to 2000. Despite facing significant challenges including armed conflicts and civil strife in several countries, the estimated number of measles-related deaths in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) has decreased by more than 75 percent since 2000. To sustain measles mortality reduction and to achieve the regional measles elimination goal, all EMR countries will need to achieve a high coverage with the first dose of measles vaccine and with the second opportunity for measles immunization offered either as a routine second dose and / or provided through supplemental immunization activities (SIAs).

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  • Historical Document: March 13, 2008
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