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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Increases in Age-Group–Specific Injury Mortality — United States, 1999–2004

PRESS CONTACT: CDC
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Office of Communications
(770) 488–4902

After a long decline, total injury mortality rates in the United States have begun to increase in adults largely as a result of drug-related poisonings. Total injury mortality rates in the United States declined overall between 1979 and 1999. Between 1999 and 2004, however, the trend reversed, and total injury mortality rates rose from 53.3 to 56.2 per 100,000 population. Mortality rate increases occurred during 1999-2004 for unintentional injury, suicide, and deaths of undetermined intent, while homicide rates were stable overall. Increases in poisoning mortality accounted for 61.9% of the increase in unintentional injury, 28.0% of the increase in suicide, 81.2% of the increase in undetermined injury, and 55.7% of the increase in total injury mortality. Increases in drug-related poisoning are probably driving the poisoning increases. Increases were prominent in certain age groups: mortality increases in unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide occurred in the 45-54 years age group, while increases in unintentional injury and homicide occurred in the 20-29 years age group. The occurrence of parallel changes in multiple types of injury within specific age groups suggests an increase in one or more shared risk factors such as substance abuse. Prevention programs that focus on such shared risk factors may help to reduce rates of homicide, suicide, and unintentional injury.

Outbreak of Cutaneous Larva Migrans at a Children’s Camp — Florida, 2006

PRESS CONTACT: Olga Connor and Rosa Oses
Miami-Dade County Health Department
Office of Communications and Legislative Affairs
(786) 336-1276

Cutaneous larva migrans is a skin condition of itchy red lines and bumps that may be accompanied by blisters and/or pus-filled lesions. It is primarily caused by dog or cat hookworm larvae that are transmitted to humans through contact with feces that are present in soil or moist, sandy areas. It can best be prevented by practicing good personal hygiene, wearing protective footwear, deworming pets and removing animal feces from beaches and other areas of human activity. In summer 2006, the Miami-Dade County Health Department investigated an outbreak of 22 clinically diagnosed cases of cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) among participants at a children’s aquatic camp located on Miami beach. CLM is a skin condition most often caused by dog or cat hookworm larvae that are transmitted to humans through contact with feces that are usually present in soil or moist, sandy areas. Symptoms include itchy red lines and bumps that may be accompanied by blisters and/or pus-filled lesions. All cases were effectively treated with topical or oral antihelminthic medications. The likely source of exposure in this outbreak was a sandbox contaminated with feces of stray cats. Interviews conducted with parents of the campers found that most children played in the sandbox one hour daily for several weeks and wore bathing suits and no shoes. Recommendations were made to replace the sand in the sandbox, cover it with a tarp when not in use and to remove stray animals from the premises. Human hookworm infestation is best prevented by practicing good personal hygiene, wearing protective footwear, deworming pets and removing animal feces from beaches and areas of human activity. Although the condition is not reportable and therefore the prevalence in the United States in unknown, it is most commonly found in tropical or subtropical geographic locations.

Update: Influenza Activity — United States, September 30–December 1, 2007

PRESS CONTACT: CDC
Division of Media Relations
(404) 639–3286

No summary available

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: December 13, 2007
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