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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Acute Respiratory Disease Associated with Adenovirus Type 14 — Four States, 2006–2007

Doug McBride
Texas Department of State Health Services
(512)458-7524

A rare strain of adenovirus (serotype 14) that can cause severe respiratory disease outbreaks is becoming more common in the United States. This virus can cause severe respiratory disease in people of all ages, including healthy young adults. If a medical provider sees a patient with severe or worsening respiratory symptoms, they might want to test for adenovirus. If the patient does have adenovirus, the provider might want to closely monitor the patient in case their condition worsens and requires more aggressive care.

Racial Disparities in Diabetes Mortality Among Persons Aged 1–19 Years — United States, 1979–2004

PRESS CONTACT: CDC
National Center for Health Statistics
Office of Communications
(301) 458-4800

Consistent racial disparities have existed in diabetes mortality among youths in the United States over the past two and a half decades. We need to better understand the reasons for this and work towards eliminating these disparities. Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting 18 per 10,000 children and adolescents under the age of 20 in the United States. Long-term complications from diabetes, such as cardiovascular disease, are infrequent in the pediatric population, and diabetes deaths are relatively rare (annual average of 89 deaths in 2003–2004 for children aged 1–19). However, these deaths are preventable, which is why it is important to examine trends and disparities in pediatric diabetes mortality. From 1979 to 2004, consistent racial disparities have existed in diabetes mortality among youths in the United States, with death rates for black youths at levels approximately twice those for white youths. The reasons for these disparities are not fully understood. Possible explanations include differences in access to and use of health care services, and differences in the quality of disease education and treatment. Further research is needed to discern the specific reasons for increased diabetes mortality in black youths, and to work towards eliminating these disparities.

Progress Toward Poliomyelitis Eradication — India, January 2006–September 2007

PRESS CONTACT: CDC
Division of Media Relations
Office of Communications
(404) 639-3286

The strong progress towards elimination of type 1 poliovirus in western Uttar Pradesh is evidence that poliovirus transmission can be interrupted in India. The government of India and partner organizations have implemented many new strategies to improve vaccination coverage. Continuing the current momentum is critical for successful interruption of poliovirus transmission and eventual global eradication. From January 2006-September 2007, India experienced two outbreaks of poliomyelitis—type 1 poliovirus in 2006 and type 3 poliovirus in 2007. The outbreak in 2006 was rapidly controlled using targeted vaccination campaigns in the areas where the outbreak occurred, and a similar strategy is underway this year for the type 3 polio outbreak. The government of India and partner organizations have implemented multiple strategic interventions to reach at-risk populations. Successful eradication of poliomyelitis in India will require continued efforts toward controlling the type 3 polio outbreak, rapidly reducing the ongoing transmission of type 1 poliovirus in the state of Bihar, sustaining the current progress in Uttar Pradesh, and maintaining high population immunity in the remainder of the country.

West Nile Virus Update

PRESS CONTACT: CDC
Division of Media Relations
Office of Communications
(404) 639-3286

No Summary Available

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

  • Historical Document: November 15, 2007
  • Content source: Office of Enterprise Communication
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