Obesity Among WIC-Enrolled Young Children

Obesity affects children from low-income families more than children from high-income families. Children in low-income families are often served by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

To monitor obesity prevalence and identify priority areas that need attention, the CDC works with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) which administers WIC at national and regional levels. The CDC and USDA analyze data from the WIC Participant and Program Characteristics Reportexternal icon (WIC PC).

WIC PC is a biennial census, conducted by the USDA in April of even years. WIC PC summarizes the demographic characteristics of WIC participants nationwide and includes information on nutrition risk characteristics such as weight status.

What is WIC?

WIC is a federal program that promotes healthy eating and nutrition education for infants and children up to age 5, and low-income women who are pregnant, postpartum, or breastfeeding.

Nutrition during pregnancy and early childhood is critical for healthy child growth and development. To be eligible for WICexternal icon, women, infants, and children must meet residential, income, and nutrition risk requirements.

State-Level Data Show Modest Decline in Obesity Among WIC-Enrolled Young Children

A study published in November 2019 found 41 WIC state and territory agencies with significant declines in obesity among children aged 2-4 years between 2010 and 2016. That compared with 34 WIC state agencies reporting a decline in obesity among this age group from 2010 to 2014. Obesity prevalence reported in 2016 varied from 7.8 percent to 19.8 percent. Read the press release and  full report.

More than 12 million children from 56 WIC state agencies and territories were in the analytic sample. Other findings included:

  • Obesity decreased by more than 3 percent in New Jersey, New Mexico, Utah, Virginia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and Puerto Rico.
  • 3 state agencies showed significant increases in obesity: Alabama (0.5 percent), North Carolina (0.6 percent), and West Virginia (2.2 percent).

Tip: When discussing topics like obesity and other chronic diseases, use person-first language (e.g., children with obesity) as well as respectful images. More information can be found here: Guidelines for Media Portrayals of Individuals Affected by Obesityexternal icon.

Maternal, Infant, & Toddler Nutrition, Physical Activity, & Healthy Growth. A collection of resources for parents and caregivers, health care providers, and partners.
Prevalence of obesity among children aged 2–4 years enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), by WIC state or territory agency — United States, 2010─2016
Prevalence of obesity among children aged 2–4 years enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), by WIC state or territory agency — United States, 2010─2016
2010 2016 2016 versus 2010
State No. Crude prevalence % (95% CI) No. Crude prevalence % (95% CI) Adjusted prevalence
ratio*(95% CI)
Adjusted prevalence
difference† % (95% CI)
Alabama§,¶ 45,743 15.8 (15.5 to 16.2) 42,671 16.3 (15.9 to 16.6) 1.03 (1.00 to 1.06) 0.5 (0.0 to 1.0)
Alaska** 10,108 21.2 (20.4 to 22.0) 5,983 19.8 (18.8 to 20.8) 0.92 (0.86 to 0.97) –1.6 (–2.8 to –0.3)
Arizona** 72,933 15.0 (14.8 to 15.3) 58,054 12.1 (11.8 to 12.3) 0.81 (0.79 to 0.84) –2.7 (–3.1 to –2.4)
Arkansas** 31,245 14.8 (14.4 to 15.2) 23,647 13.3 (12.8 to 13.7) 0.90 (0.87 to 0.94) –1.4 (–2.0 to –0.8)
California** 583,008 18.4 (18.3 to 18.5) 495,095 15.5 (15.4 to 15.6) 0.86 (0.86 to 0.87) –2.5 (–2.6 to –2.3)
Colorado** 39,612 9.6 (9.3 to 9.8) 31,307 8.1 (7.8 to 8.4) 0.85 (0.81 to 0.90) –1.4 (–1.8 to –1.0)
Connecticut** 22,988 17.1 (16.6 to 17.6) 18,748 14.4 (13.9 to 14.9) 0.87 (0.83 to 0.91) –2.2 (–2.9 to –1.5)
Delaware 7,650 18.4 (17.5 to 19.2) 6,906 16.2 (15.3 to 17.0) 0.93 (0.87 to 1.00) –1.1 (–2.3 to 0.2)
District of Columbia** 5,182 14.4 (13.5 to 15.4) 5,181 11.4 (10.5 to 12.3) 0.83 (0.75 to 0.91) –2.4 (–3.7 to –1.1)
Florida** 194,924 14.6 (14.4 to 14.7) 193,749 12.7 (12.6 to 12.9) 0.87 (0.86 to 0.89) –1.8 (–2.0 to –1.6)
Georgia** 104,959 14.4 (14.2 to 14.6) 78,023 12.5 (12.3 to 12.8) 0.88 (0.86 to 0.90) –1.8 (–2.1 to –1.4)
Hawaii 14,504 9.7 (9.3 to 10.2) 11,589 9.6 (9.1 to 10.1) 0.98 (0.91 to 1.06) –0.2 (–0.9 to 0.6)
Idaho** 18,704 11.9 (11.5 to 12.4) 14,521 11.3 (10.8 to 11.8) 0.95 (0.89 to 1.00) –0.6 (–1.3 to 0.1)
Illinois** 108,762 15.7 (15.5 to 15.9) 79,949 14.8 (14.6 to 15.0) 0.98 (0.96 to 1.00) –0.3 (–0.6 to 0.1)
Indiana** 63,220 15.1 (14.8 to 15.4) 55,955 13.0 (12.7 to 13.2) 0.91 (0.88 to 0.93) –1.4 (–1.8 to –1.0)
Iowa 29,481 15.6 (15.2 to 16.0) 24,427 15.2 (14.8 to 15.7) 1.00 (0.96 to 1.04) 0.0 (–0.6 to 0.6)
Kansas** 30,458 13.7 (13.4 to 14.1) 24,306 12.5 (12.1 to 12.9) 0.91 (0.87 to 0.95) –1.3 (–1.8 to –0.7)
Kentucky** 45,761 18.2 (17.9 to 18.6) 38,361 15.9 (15.6 to 16.3) 0.88 (0.85 to 0.91) –2.2 (–2.7 to –1.7)
Louisiana** 48,145 13.8 (13.5 to 14.1) 37,527 13.2 (12.9 to 13.6) 0.94 (0.91 to 0.98) –0.8 (–1.2 to –0.3)
Maine** 10,410 15.2 (14.6 to 15.9) 8,233 13.9 (13.2 to 14.7) 0.92 (0.85 to 0.98) –1.3 (–2.3 to –0.2)
Maryland** 51,280 17.1 (16.8 to 17.4) 50,469 15.6 (15.3 to 16.0) 0.92 (0.90 to 0.95) –1.3 (–1.8 to –0.9)
Massachusetts** 49,178 17.1 (16.8 to 17.5) 41,740 16.4 (16.0 to 16.7) 0.94 (0.91 to 0.96) –1.0 (–1.5 to –0.6)
Michigan** 85,293 14.4 (14.2 to 14.6) 84,387 13.3 (13.1 to 13.5) 0.95 (0.93 to 0.97) –0.7 (–1.0 to –0.3)
Minnesota** 57,529 12.7 (12.4 to 13.0) 47,219 12.2 (11.9 to 12.5) 0.95 (0.92 to 0.98) –0.6 (–1.0 to –0.2)
Mississippi** 36,519 14.9 (14.6 to 15.3) 28,493 14.4 (14.0 to 14.8) 0.96 (0.92 to 0.99) –0.6 (–1.2 to –0.1)
Missouri** 50,575 14.4 (14.1 to 14.8) 43,404 12.3 (12.0 to 12.6) 0.86 (0.83 to 0.88) –2.1 (–2.5 to –1.6)
Montana 7,194 13.4 (12.6 to 14.2) 6,647 12.1 (11.3 to 12.8) 0.89 (0.82 to 0.97) –1.5 (–2.6 to –0.4)
Nebraska 15,622 14.4 (13.8 to 14.9) 13,807 15.2 (14.6 to 15.7) 1.05 (1.00 to 1.11) 0.8 (0.0 to 1.6)
Nevada** 25,855 15.0 (14.6 to 15.5) 24,493 11.6 (11.2 to 12.0) 0.80 (0.77 to 0.84) –2.9 (–3.5 to –2.3)
New Hampshire 7,263 15.0 (14.1 to 15.8) 6,042 15.8 (14.9 to 16.7) 1.05 (0.97 to 1.14) 0.8 (–0.5 to 2.0)
New Jersey** 59,000 18.9 (18.6 to 19.2) 53,917 15.0 (14.7 to 15.3) 0.80 (0.78 to 0.82) –3.9 (–4.3 to –3.4)
New Mexico** 21,968 15.7 (15.2 to 16.1) 18,619 12.1 (11.6 to 12.5) 0.77 (0.73 to 0.81) –3.7 (–4.4 to –3.0)
New York** 186,760 16.1 (16.0 to 16.3) 182,401 13.7 (13.6 to 13.9) 0.88 (0.87 to 0.89) –1.9 (–2.1 to –1.7)
North Carolina§,¶ 89,798 13.9 (13.6 to 14.1) 97,286 14.2 (14.0 to 14.5) 1.04 (1.02 to 1.06) 0.6 (0.3 to 0.9)
North Dakota 5,484 14.5 (13.5 to 15.4) 4,723 14.3 (13.3 to 15.3) 0.99 (0.90 to 1.09) –0.1 (–1.4 to 1.3)
Ohio 102,803 12.6 (12.4 to 12.8) 74,753 12.4 (12.2 to 12.6) 0.98 (0.96 to 1.01) –0.2 (–0.5 to 0.1)
Oklahoma** 37,849 15.4 (15.1 to 15.8) 34,486 13.1 (12.8 to 13.5) 0.85 (0.82 to 0.88) –2.4 (–2.9 to –1.8)
Oregon** 43,209 15.8 (15.5 to 16.2) 34,485 14.7 (14.4 to 15.1) 0.94 (0.91 to 0.97) –1.0 (–1.5 to –0.5)
Pennsylvania** 96,762 12.8 (12.6 to 13.1) 80,202 12.2 (12.0 to 12.4) 0.96 (0.94 to 0.98) –0.5 (–0.8 to –0.2)
Rhode Island** 10,783 16.4 (15.7 to 17.1) 6,984 15.4 (14.5 to 16.2) 0.93 (0.86 to 0.99) –1.2 (–2.3 to –0.1)
South Carolina** 39,785 13.3 (13.0 to 13.7) 32,399 11.4 (11.1 to 11.8) 0.89 (0.85 to 0.92) –1.5 (–2.0 to –1.0)
South Dakota 7,884 17.3 (16.5 to 18.1) 6,771 17.1 (16.2 to 18.0) 0.95 (0.88 to 1.02) –0.8 (–2.1 to 0.4)
Tennessee** 57,153 16.0 (15.7 to 16.3) 51,157 14.6 (14.3 to 14.9) 0.92 (0.89 to 0.94) –1.3 (–1.8 to –0.9)
Texas** 361,823 16.9 (16.8 to 17.0) 268,787 14.6 (14.4 to 14.7) 0.89 (0.88 to 0.90) –1.9 (–2.0 to –1.7)
Utah** 26,045 12.5 (12.1 to 12.9) 21,599 7.9 (7.6 to 8.3) 0.64 (0.60 to 0.67) –4.6 (–5.1 to –4.0)
Vermont 6,964 13.8 (13.0 to 14.7) 5,254 14.5 (13.5 to 15.4) 1.04 (0.95 to 1.13) 0.6 (–0.7 to 1.8)
Virginia¶,** 48,920 21.5 (21.2 to 21.9) 47,376 15.3 (14.9 to 15.6) 0.73 (0.71 to 0.75) –5.8 (–6.3 to –5.3)
Washington** 78,336 14.9 (14.6 to 15.1) 69,870 13.3 (13.0 to 13.5) 0.89 (0.87 to 0.91) –1.6 (–2.0 to –1.3)
West Virginia§,¶ 17,669 14.4 (13.9 to 14.9) 14,222 16.6 (16.0 to 17.2) 1.15 (1.09 to 1.21) 2.2 (1.4 to 3.0)
Wisconsin** 48,511 15.2 (14.9 to 15.5) 37,116 14.3 (14.0 to 14.7) 0.94 (0.91 to 0.97) –0.9 (–1.4 to –0.4)
Wyoming** 4,413 11.8 (10.9 to 12.8) 3,458 9.1 (8.1 to 10.1) 0.76 (0.67 to 0.87) –2.8 (–4.2 to –1.5)
Territory
American Samoa 3,221 14.6 (13.4 to 15.8) 2,824 13.7 (12.4 to 15.0) 0.94 (0.83 to 1.06) –0.9 (–2.7 to 0.9)
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands** 2,157 14.1 (12.6 to 15.6) 1,418 7.8 (6.4 to 9.2) 0.55 (0.45 to 0.68) –6.4 (–8.4 to –4.4)
Guam** 3,248 11.4 (10.3 to 12.5) 2,710 8.3 (7.3 to 9.4) 0.73 (0.62 to 0.85) –3.1 (–4.6 to –1.6)
Puerto Rico** 70,699 20.3 (20.0 to 20.6) 63,251 12.0 (11.8 to 12.3) 0.60 (0.58 to 0.61) –8.2 (–8.6 to –7.8)
U.S. Virgin Islands 2,093 12.4 (11.0 to 13.8) 1,593 13.1 (11.5 to 14.8) 1.07 (0.90 to 1.26) 0.8 (–1.4 to 3.0)
Abbreviation: CI = confidence interval.
* Obtained from log binomial regression model adjusted for age in month, sex, and race/ethnicity.
† Calculated as 100 times the average marginal effect of year (2010 versus 2016) from logistic regression controlling for age, sex, and race. A negative value indicates that the prevalence decreased.
§ Statistically significant increase in obesity prevalence during 2010–2016 determined by trend test using log binomial regression model adjusted for age, sex, and race/ethnicity with all years of data included.
¶ Change in the data reporting system in 2016 might affect obesity prevalence.
** Statistically significant decrease in obesity prevalence during 2010–2016 determined by trend test using log binomial regression model adjusted for age, sex, and race/ethnicity with all
years of data included.

Changes in obesity prevalence among children aged 2–4 years enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), by WIC state or territory agency in the United States, 2010–2016.

National Trends Indicate Decline in Obesity Among WIC-Enrolled Young Children

For a research letterexternal icon published in April 2019, CDC and USDA authors analyzed national obesity trends from 2010 to 2016 among children aged 2-4 years from WIC-enrolled families. The authors found that:

  • In 2016, 13.9% of WIC participants aged 2 to 4 years had obesity. That was a decrease from 15.5% in 2010. Obesity had increased among this group from 2000 – 2010.
  • The prevalence of overweight and obesity combined decreased from 32.5% in 2010 to 29.1% in 2016.
  • The greatest relative decreases were among children aged 2–3 years, boys, and children who were Asian/Pacific Islanders.
  • The prevalence of obesity in 2016 was higher among Hispanic (16.4%) and American Indian/Alaska Native (18.5%) young children than among children who were non-Hispanic White (12.1%), non-Hispanic Black (11.4%), or Asian/Pacific Islanders (10.0%).
Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among U.S. Children Aged 2–4 Years Enrolled in WIC by Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity, 2010-2016
Table 1. Prevalence of Overweight or Obesity Among U.S. Children Aged 2–4 Years Enrolled in WIC by Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity, 2010-2016
Prevalencea, % (95% CI) 2016 vs 2010
2010 2012 2014 2016 Adjusted
Prevalence Ratio
(95% CI)
Adjusted
Prevalence Differenceb
(95% CI)
Overweight or Obesity (BMI at or above the 85th percentile for age and sex on the CDC growth charts)
Overallc 32.5 (32.5 to 32.6) 31.2 (31.1 to 31.2) 30.2 (30.1 to 30.2) 29.1 (29.1 to 29.2) 0.90 (0.90 to 0.90) -3.2 (-3.3 to -3.2)
Age in yearsc
2 30.2 (30.2 to 30.3) 28.6 (28.5 to 28.7) 27.5 (27.5 to 27.6) 27.1 (27.0 to 27.2) 0.90 (0.90 to 0.90) -3.0 (-3.1 to -2.9)
3 33.4 (33.3 to 33.4) 32.0 (31.9 to 32.1) 31.1 (31.1 to 31.2) 29.7 (29.7 to 29.8) 0.90 (0.89 to 0.90) -3.5 (-3.6 to -3.4)
4 35.2 (35.1 to 35.3) 33.9 (33.8 to 34.0) 33.2 (33.1 to 33.3) 31.7 (31.5 to 31.8) 0.91 (0.90 to 0.91) -3.3 (-3.5 to -3.2)
Sexc
Boys 33.5 (33.4 to 33.6) 31.8 (31.8 to 31.9) 30.9 (30.8 to 31.0) 29.6 (29.5 to 29.6) 0.89 (0.88 to 0.89) -3.8 (-3.9 to -3.7)
Girls 31.5 (31.5 to 31.6) 30.5 (30.4 to 30.5) 29.5 (29.4 to 29.6) 28.6 (28.6 to 28.7) 0.92 (0.91 to 0.92) -2.7 (-2.8 to -2.6)
Race/Ethnicityc,d
Non-Hispanic White 28.8 (28.7 to 28.9) 27.8 (27.7 to 27.9) 27.7 (27.6 to 27.8) 27.4 (27.3 to 27.5) 0.95 (0.95 to 0.96) -1.4 (-1.5 to -1.3)
Non-Hispanic Black 27.3 (27.2 to 27.4) 26.3 (26.2 to 26.4) 25.9 (25.8 to 26.0) 25.0 (24.9 to 25.1) 0.92 (0.91 to 0.92) -2.2 (-2.4 to -2.1)
Hispanic 37.2 (37.1 to 37.3) 35.5 (35.4 to 35.6) 34.0 (33.9 to 34.1) 32.6 (32.5 to 32.6) 0.88 (0.87 to 0.88) -4.6 (-4.7 to -4.5)
American Indian/
Alaska Native
40.3 (39.8 to 40.8) 37.5 (37.0 to 37.9) 36.2 (35.7 to 36.7) 36.7 (36.2 to 37.2) 0.91 (0.90 to 0.93) -3.6 (-4.2 to -2.9)
Asian/
Pacific Islander
26.6 (26.4 to 26.9) 25.2 (25.0 to 25.5) 24.2 (24.0 to 24.4) 22.4 (22.1 to 22.6) 0.84 (0.83 to 0.85) -4.2 (-4.5 to -3.9)
Abbreviation: WIC, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children; BMI, body mass index; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

aCrude prevalence. Biologically implausible z scores were defined as the following when calculating the prevalence: height for age less than −5.0 or above 4.0, weight for age less than −5.0 or above 8.0, and body mass index for age less than −4.0 or more than 8.0.

bCalculated from prevalence in 2010 and adjusted prevalence ratio between 2010 and 2016 obtained from log binomial regression model controlled for age, sex, and race/ethnicity: [prevalence in 2010 x adjusted prevalence ratio between 2010 and 2016] – prevalence in 2010.

cP<0.001 for trend tests with all years’ data included; P values were obtained from log binomial regression models controlled for age, sex, and race/ethnicity.

dTrends are presented by race/ethnicity because they are important for identifying health disparities.

Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among U.S. Children Aged 2–4 Years Enrolled in WIC by Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity, 2010-2016
Table 2. Prevalence of Obesity Among U.S. Children Aged 2–4 Years Enrolled in WIC by Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity, 2010-2016
Prevalencea, % (95% CI) 2016 vs 2010
2010 2012 2014 2016 Adjusted
Prevalence Ratio
(95% CI)
Adjusted
Prevalence Differenceb
(95% CI)
Obesity (BMI at or above the 95th percentile for age and sex on the CDC growth charts)
Overallc 15.9 (15.9 to 16.0) 15.2 (15.1 to 15.2) 14.5 (14.5 to 14.6) 13.9 (13.9 to 13.9) 0.88 (0.88 to 0.89) -1.9 (-1.9 to -1.8)
Age in yearsc
2 14.1 (14.0 to 14.1) 13.2 (13.1 to 13.3) 12.5 (12.4 to 12.5) 12.3 (12.2 to 12.3) 0.88 (0.87 to 0.88) -1.7 (-1.8 to -1.6)
3 16.6 (16.6 to 16.7) 15.9 (15.8 to 15.9) 15.4 (15.3 to 15.4) 14.5 (14.5 to 14.6) 0.88 (0.87 to 0.88) -2.0 (-2.1 to -1.9)
4 17.9 (17.8 to 18.0) 17.2 (17.1 to 17.3) 16.8 (16.7 to 16.9) 15.8 (15.7 to 15.9) 0.89 (0.88 to 0.90) -2.0 (-2.1 to -1.9)
Sexc
Boys 16.8 (16.7 to 16.9) 15.9 (15.8 to 15.9) 15.2 (15.1 to 15.2) 14.4 (14.3 to 14.5) 0.87 (0.86 to 0.87) -2.2 (-2.3 to -2.2)
Girls 15.0 (14.9 to 15.1) 14.4 (14.4 to 14.5) 13.9 (13.8 to 14.0) 13.4 (13.3 to 13.4) 0.90 (0.90 to 0.91) -1.5 (-1.6 to -1.4)
Race/Ethnicityc,d
Non-Hispanic White 12.8 (12.7 to 12.9) 12.4 (12.3 to 12.4) 12.2 (12.2 to 12.3) 12.1 (12.0 to 12.2) 0.95 (0.94 to 0.95) -0.7 (-0.8 to -0.6)
Non-Hispanic Black 12.7 (12.6 to 12.8) 12.1 (12.0 to 12.2) 11.9 (11.8 to 11.9) 11.4 (11.3 to 11.5) 0.90 (0.89 to 0.91) -1.2 (-1.3 to -1.1)
Hispanic 19.3 (19.2 to 19.3) 18.3 (18.2 to 18.3) 17.3 (17.3 to 17.4) 16.4 (16.4 to 16.5) 0.86 (0.85 to 0.86) -2.8 (-2.9 to -2.7)
American Indian/
Alaska Native
20.9 (20.5 to 21.3) 18.9 (18.5 to 19.2) 18.0 (17.6 to 18.3) 18.5 (18.1 to 18.9) 0.88 (0.86 to 0.91) -2.4 (-3.0 to -1.9)
Asian/
Pacific Islander
12.5 (12.3 to 12.6) 11.7 (11.5 to 11.9) 11.1 (10.9 to 11.3) 10.0 (9.9 to 10.2) 0.81 (0.79 to 0.82) -2.4 (-2.6 to -2.2)
Abbreviation: WIC, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children; BMI, body mass index; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

aCrude prevalence. Biologically implausible z scores were defined as the following when calculating the prevalence: height for age less than −5.0 or above 4.0, weight for age less than −5.0 or above 8.0, and body mass index for age less than −4.0 or more than 8.0.

bCalculated from prevalence in 2010 and adjusted prevalence ratio between 2010 and 2016 obtained from log binomial regression model controlled for age, sex, and race/ethnicity: [prevalence in 2010 x adjusted prevalence ratio between 2010 and 2016] – prevalence in 2010.

cP<0.001 for trend tests with all years’ data included; P values were obtained from log binomial regression models controlled for age, sex, and race/ethnicity.

dTrends are presented by race/ethnicity because they are important for identifying health disparities.

Obesity Prevalence Based on Height to Weight Ratio Among WIC-Enrolled Infants Declined from 2010-2014

One way to measure infants’ relative weight is to consider their weight and length. Infants with high weight for their length are at increased risk of obesity in childhood and early adulthood.

A study published in 2016external icon found that overall, the prevalence of WIC-enrolled infants aged 3 to 23 months with high weight for their length decreased from 14.5% in 2010 to 12.3% in 2014. During this time, 36 states and territories observed a significant decrease in high weight-for-length among infants aged 3 to-23 months. See state and territory specific information.

The study reported the following:

  • High weight-for-length varied across racial/ethnic groups with the 2014 prevalence higher among American Indian (15.6%) and Hispanic (13.8%) infants than among Black (11.9%), White (11%), and Asian/Pacific Islander (8.5%) infants.
  • Between 2010–2014, all 20 combinations of race/ethnicity and income showed decreases in the prevalence of high weight-for-length, with the largest decrease among children who were American Indian and Hispanic.
Child and Teen Healthy Weight and Obesity. Learn More at www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/resources/child-teen-resources.html