Traumatic Injury Prevention Program

What are our priorities?

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Traumatic Injury Prevention Program partners with industry, labor, government agencies, trade associations, professional organizations, and academia to reduce and prevent work-related injury and death. The program’s research focuses on these areas:

  • addressing the leading causes of work-related traumatic injury.
  • reducing work-related injuries among high-risk occupations and vulnerable worker populations.
  • understanding emerging technologies in the workplace.
What do we do?
  • Conduct research to develop an evidence base to prevent the leading causes of work-related traumatic injuries: falls, motor vehicle crashes, violence, and contact with industrial machines and vehicles.
  • Identify and evaluate ways to reduce traumatic injuries among high-risk occupations and vulnerable worker groups, such as young and older workers, and those in non-standard work arrangements, such as temporary workers.
  • Share research findings and evidence-based recommendations with partners who can put the information into practice. Partners include: manufacturers, consensus standard committees, employers, workers, and government agencies.
  • Conduct surveillance and make occupational injury data available to the research community, employers, and workers to guide research and prevention efforts.
What have we accomplished?
  • Added a boom lift scenario to the NIOSH Aerial Lift Hazard Recognition interactive tool that allows operators to virtually navigate sites and identify potential fall hazards.
  • Posted a new Mast Climbing Work Platform Daily Inspection Walkthrough Tool that uses interactive images to help users identify pre-shift and daily inspection points.
  • Published results of a motor vehicle safety program evaluation from a large metropolitan police department. Implementation of the safety program resulted in a decrease in motor vehicle crashes.
  • RAND reportexternal icon estimated that NIOSH efforts with partners to improve ambulance design could have an economic impact of $2.5-$8 million saved annually.
  • Co-branded a fact sheet for taxi drivers on robbery and violence prevention strategies with the International Association of Transportation Regulators and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
  • Published an analysis of drug overdose deaths at work from 2011-2016 and disseminated findings via infographics on social media.
  • Published a NIOSH Science Blog with recommendations for working safely with robots, with state partner Washington State Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program.
  • Conducted CDC/NIOSH’s first external crowdsourcing competition to improve machine learning algorithms for coding of injury narratives. The competition improved injury narrative coding rates from 82% to nearly 90%.
What’s next?
  • Publish results from a collaborative evaluation of the US Air Force Fall Prevention Program’s impact on reducing work-related fall injuries.
  • Center for Motor Vehicle Safety will release a 10-year strategic plan to guide future research to prevent work-related motor vehicle crashes and resulting injuries.
  • Convert programming for the Workplace Violence Prevention Course for Nurses for use by organizations with learning management systems.
  • Publish special issue of the Journal of Safety Research covering research presented at the 7th National Occupational Injury Research Symposium in October 2018.
  • Fund workplace collaborative robot research through a partnership with the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Agriculture.

Mention of any company or product does not constitute endorsement by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

At-A-Glance

The Traumatic Injury Prevention Program strives to improve workplace safety to reduce traumatic injuries. This snapshot shows recent accomplishments and upcoming projects.

Rate of fatalities from work-related injuries in all industries (per 100,000 FTE)
Rate of fatalities from work-related injuries in all industries (per 100,000 FTE)

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal
Occupational Injuries

Leading causes of work-related death, 2018
Leading causes of work-related death, 2018

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal
Occupational Injuries

Rate of work-related injuries in private sector, as reported by employers (per 100 FTE)
Rate of work-related injuries in private sector, as reported by employers (per 100 FTE)

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of
Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

To learn more, visit
https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/programs/ti/
June 2020

Page last reviewed: June 5, 2020