Traumatic Injury Prevention Program PPOP

What are our priorities?

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Traumatic Injury Prevention Program partners with industry, labor, government agencies, trade associations, professional organizations, and academia to reduce and prevent work-related injury and death. The program’s research focuses on these areas:

  • addressing the leading causes of work-related traumatic injury.
  • reducing work-related injuries among high-risk occupations and vulnerable worker populations.
  • understanding emerging technologies in the workplace.
What do we do?
  • Conduct research to develop an evidence base to enable the prevention of the leading causes of work-related traumatic injuries: falls, motor vehicle crashes, violence, and contact with industrial machines and vehicles.
  • Identify and evaluate ways to reduce traumatic injuries among high-risk occupations and vulnerable worker groups, such as young and older workers, and those in non-standard work arrangements, such as temporary workers.
  • Share research findings and evidence-based recommendations with partners who can put the information into practice. Partners include: manufacturers, consensus standard committees, employers, workers, and government agencies.
  • Conduct surveillance and make occupational injury data available to the research community, employers, and workers to guide research and prevention efforts.
What have we accomplished?
  • Guided the publication of a special issue of the Journal of Safety Researchexternal icon covering presentations from the 7th National Occupational Injury Research Symposium (NOIRS) in October 2018.
  • Developed a new strategic plan for 2020-2029 for the NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety that will guide future research to prevent work-related motor vehicle crashes and resulting injuries.
  • Released guidance to limit violence towards workers that may occur when businesses put in place policies and practices to help minimize the spread of COVID-19. Guidance included a basic dos and don’ts infographic for employees.
  • Partnered with the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund studies of collaborative robots in the workplace through NSF’s National Robotics Initiative 2.0. The Initiative supports research in the U.S. that will accelerate the development and use of collaborative robots, an emerging robotic technology that complements, but does not replace, human workers.
  • Published a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that estimated 3.2 million nonfatal injuries requiring treatment at hospital emergency departments occurred among young workers in the U.S. from 2012-2018, with the highest rates among workers 18-19 years of age.
What’s next?
  • Partner with the NSF to fund studies on innovations in integration of robotics to improve worker safety through NSF’s National Robotics Initiative 3.0external icon.
  • Produce a short training video for firefighters based on the NIOSH Row House Firefighting Tactics factsheet and poster.
  • Modify a rap video produced by the Oregon Healthy Workforce Center’s PUSH (Promoting U through Safety & Health) program on reducing workplace injury among young workers, and
  • co-brand and publish on the CDC YouTube channel.
  • Publish results from surveillance research using digital disease detection methods to collect near real-time data on workplace violence events and suicides among workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Expand the Work-Related Injury Statistics Query System (Work-RISQS) to allow analyses of emergency department-treated occupational injuries by industry.

Mention of any company or product does not constitute endorsement by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

At-A-Glance

The Traumatic Injury Prevention Program strives to improve workplace safety to reduce traumatic injuries. This snapshot shows recent accomplishments and upcoming projects.

Counts and rate of fatalities from work-related injuries in all industries (per 100,000 FTE)
Counts and rate of fatalities from work-related injuries in all industries (per 100,000 FTE)

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Leading causes of work-related death, 2019
Leading causes of work-related death, 2019

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Row House Firefighting Tactics Poster

To learn more, visit
https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/programs/ti/
June 2021

Page last reviewed: June 5, 2020