Health Care Access, Telemedicine, and Loss of Work Due to Illness

The Research and Development Survey (RANDS) is a platform designed for conducting survey question evaluation and statistical research. RANDS is an ongoing series of surveys from probability-sampled commercial survey panels used for methodological research at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). RANDS estimates were generated using an experimental approach that differs from the survey design approaches generally used by NCHS, including possible biases from different response patterns and increased variability from lower sample sizes. Use of the RANDS platform allowed NCHS to produce more timely data than would have been possible using our traditional data collection methods. RANDS is not designed to replace NCHS’ higher quality, core data collections. Below we provide experimental estimates of a selected number of key issues – loss of work due to illness with COVID-19, telemedicine access and use before and during the pandemic, and reduced access to specific types of health care due to the pandemic. Two rounds of RANDS during COVID-19 data collection are planned, and data collection for the first round occurred between June 9, 2020 and July 6, 2020. The data presented here are from the first round only. Information needed to interpret these estimates can be found in the Technical Notes.

RANDS during COVID-19
Close up of businessman or accountant hand holding pen working making notes and using laptop computer to calculate business data, accountancy document at his office, business accounting concept

Experimental estimates show the percentage of U.S. adults who did not work for pay at a job or business, at any point, in the previous week because either they or someone in their family was sick with COVID-19. Data are available by age, race and Hispanic origin, sex, education, urbanization, and chronic conditions.

Over the shoulder shot of a patient talking to a doctor using of a digital tablet

Experimental estimates show the percentage of U.S. adults who have a usual place of care and a provider that offered telemedicine in the past two months, who used telemedicine in the past two months, or who have a usual place of care and a provider that offered telemedicine prior to the coronavirus pandemic. Data are available by age, race and Hispanic origin, sex, education, urbanization, and chronic conditions.

Woman doctor using tablet computer in hospital

Experimental estimates show the percentage of U.S. adults who were unable to receive selected types of medical care. Data are available by age, race and Hispanic origin, sex, education, urbanization, and chronic conditions.

Page last reviewed: August 5, 2020