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Surveillance for Certain Health Behaviors and Conditions Among States and Selected Local Areas — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015


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Cassandra M. Pickens, PhD1,2; Carol Pierannunzi, PhD1; William Garvin, MS1; Machell Town, PhD1 (View author affiliations)

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Abstract

Problem: Chronic conditions and disorders (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, and depression) are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Healthy behaviors (e.g., physical activity, avoiding cigarette use, and refraining from binge drinking) and preventive practices (e.g., visiting a doctor for a routine check-up, tracking blood pressure, and monitoring blood cholesterol) might help prevent or successfully manage these chronic conditions. Monitoring chronic diseases, health-risk behaviors, and access to and use of health care are fundamental to the development of effective public health programs and policies at the state and local levels.

Reporting Period: January–December 2015.

Description of the System: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based, random-digit–dialed landline- and cellular-telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years residing in the United States. BRFSS collects data on health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, access to and use of health care, and use of preventive health services related to the leading causes of death and disability. This report presents results for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico), and Guam and for 130 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs) (N = 441,456 respondents) for 2015.

Results: The age-adjusted prevalence estimates of health-risk behaviors, self-reported chronic health conditions, access to and use of health care, and use of preventive health services varied substantially by state, territory, and MMSA in 2015. Results are summarized for selected BRFSS measures. Each set of proportions refers to the median (range) of age-adjusted prevalence estimates for health-risk behaviors, self-reported chronic diseases or conditions, or use of preventive health care services by geographic jurisdiction, as reported by survey respondents. Adults with good or better health: 84.6% (65.9%–88.8%) for states and territories and 85.2% (66.9%–91.3%) for MMSAs. Adults with ≥14 days of poor physical health in the past 30 days: 10.9% (8.2%–17.2%) for states and territories and 10.9% (6.6%–19.1%) for MMSAs. Adults with ≥14 days of poor mental health in the past 30 days: 11.3% (7.3%–15.8%) for states and territories and 11.4% (5.6%–20.5%) for MMSAs. Adults aged 18–64 years with health care coverage: 86.8% (72.0%–93.8%) for states and territories and 86.8% (63.2%–95.7%) for MMSAs. Adults who received a routine physical checkup during the preceding 12 months: 69.0% (58.1%–79.8%) for states and territories and 69.4% (57.1%–81.1%) for MMSAs. Adults who ever had their blood cholesterol checked: 79.1% (73.3%–86.7%) for states and territories and 79.5% (65.1%–87.3%) for MMSAs. Current cigarette smoking among adults: 17.7% (9.0%–27.2%) for states and territories and 17.3% (4.5%–29.5%) for MMSAs. Binge drinking among adults during the preceding 30 days: 17.2% (11.2%–26.0%) for states and territories and 17.4% (5.5%–24.5%) for MMSAs. Adults who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the preceding month: 25.5% (17.6%–47.1%) for states and territories and 24.5% (16.1%–47.3%) for MMSAs. Adults who reported consuming fruit less than once per day during the preceding month: 40.5% (33.3%–55.5%) for states and territories and 40.3% (30.1%–57.3%) for MMSAs. Adults who reported consuming vegetables less than once per day during the preceding month: 22.4% (16.6%–31.3%) for states and territories and 22.3% (13.6%–32.0%) for MMSAs. Adults who have obesity: 29.5% (19.9%–36.0%) for states and territories and 28.5% (17.8%–41.6%) for MMSAs. Adults aged ≥45 years with diagnosed diabetes: 15.9% (11.2%–26.8%) for states and territories and 15.7% (10.5%–27.6%) for MMSAs. Adults aged ≥18 years with a form of arthritis: 22.7% (17.2%–33.6%) for states and territories and 23.2% (12.3%–33.9%) for MMSAs. Adults having had a depressive disorder: 19.0% (9.6%–27.0%) for states and territories and 19.2% (9.9%–27.2%) for MMSAs. Adults with high blood pressure: 29.1% (24.2%–39.9%) for states and territories and 29.0% (19.7%–41.0%) for MMSAs. Adults with high blood cholesterol: 31.8% (27.1%–37.3%) for states and territories and 31.4% (23.2%–42.0%) for MMSAs. Adults aged ≥45 years who have had coronary heart disease: 10.3% (7.2%–16.8%) for states and territories and 10.1% (4.7%–17.8%) for MMSAs. Adults aged ≥45 years who have had a stroke: 4.9% (2.5%–7.5%) for states and territories and 4.7% (2.1%–8.4%) for MMSAs.

Interpretation: The prevalence of health care access and use, health-risk behaviors, and chronic health conditions varied by state, territory, and MMSA. The data in this report underline the importance of continuing to monitor chronic diseases, health-risk behaviors, and access to and use of health care in order to assist in the planning and evaluation of public health programs and policies at the state, territory, and MMSA level.

Public Health Action: State and local health departments and agencies and others interested in health and health care can continue to use BRFSS data to identify groups with or at high risk for chronic conditions, unhealthy behaviors, and limited health care access and use. BRFSS data also can be used to help design, implement, monitor, and evaluate health-related programs and policies.

Introduction

Chronic conditions (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and arthritis) are leading causes of morbidity, mortality, and health care spending in the United States (1,2). Adopting healthy behaviors (e.g., eating a healthy diet, exercising, avoiding tobacco, and refraining from alcohol) and using preventive services (e.g., visiting a doctor, monitoring and treating blood pressure, and monitoring cholesterol) might prevent chronic disease and help effectively manage chronic conditions (2). At the population level, monitoring health behaviors, chronic conditions, and health care use can inform action to address these leading causes of death and disability.

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based survey conducted via landline and cellular telephone. Since 1984, BRFSS has been conducted by U.S. states and territories with technical assistance from CDC. BRFSS is the largest continuously running health-based telephone survey in the world (3). BRFSS is a principal source of data on health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases, and health care access and use at the state and local levels. States, counties, cities, and others use BRFSS data to set objectives, track progress, and evaluate the effectiveness of health-related initiatives. Beginning in 2002, BRFSS has calculated prevalence estimates for selected counties, metropolitan divisions, and metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs). This report contains age-adjusted prevalence estimates for various chronic conditions, health-risk behaviors, and use of preventive health services by state, territory, and selected MMSA for 2015.

Methods

BRFSS is an ongoing, cross-sectional, random-digit–dialed telephone survey that completes approximately 400,000 interviews with adults residing in the United States or its territories each year. BRFSS is conducted by states and territories receiving technical assistance from CDC. BRFSS uses a multistage sampling design to select a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized adult population aged ≥18 years residing within each state and territory. The validity and reliability of the BRFSS survey have been reviewed in detail elsewhere (4).

In 2015, all 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam collected both landline and cellular telephone surveys (5). In the landline survey, one adult was randomly chosen from each selected household. In the cellular phone survey, each adult respondent was considered a one-person household (6).

Participants reported their county of residence in the demographics section of the core questionnaire. Persons were assigned to MMSAs on the basis of American National Standards Institute county codes (7). MMSAs are defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (7). This report contains age-adjusted prevalence estimates for general health status, health-risk behaviors, self-reported chronic health conditions, and access to and use of health care for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam and for 130 MMSAs containing ≥500 total respondents.

Questionnaire

The BRFSS questionnaire consists of three sections: a core component, optional modules, and state-added questions. All questions in the core component and optional modules undergo technical review, cognitive testing, and field testing (6).

States must ask all core component questions without modification (6). In 2015, questions in the BRFSS core component addressed participants’ self-reported health status, number of physically and mentally healthy days in the past 30 days, health care access and use, high blood pressure awareness, high cholesterol awareness, chronic health conditions, demographics, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, arthritis burden, seatbelt use, immunization, and testing for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) (6).

In addition to the core questionnaire component, states could include up to 25 optional questionnaire modules. In 2015, a total of 24 optional modules were used by at least one state or territory as follows: adult asthma history (two states), adult human papillomavirus (nine states), anxiety and depression (five states), arthritis management (14 states), breast and cervical cancer screening (seven states), cardiovascular health (five states), caregiver (24 states), childhood asthma prevalence (32 states), clinical breast examination for breast cancer screening (three states), cognitive decline (35 states), colorectal cancer screening (12 states), diabetes (39 states), emotional support and life satisfaction (three states), industry and occupation (25 states), prediabetes (20 states), prostate cancer screening (three states), prostate cancer screening decision making (one state), sexual orientation and gender identity (22 states), shingles (nine states), social context (16 states), sodium or salt-related behavior (10 states), tetanus-diphtheria vaccination in adults (11 states), visual impairment and access to eye care (one state), and random child selection (36 states). The random child selection module collects demographic information on one randomly selected child in the household (data include age, sex, race/ethnicity, and relation of the child to the respondent). This module is also used to randomly select a child for the Asthma Call-back Survey, although various states that use the random child selection module do not participate in the Asthma Call-back Survey (8).

To address state-specific needs, states also can add their own questions to the BRFSS questionnaire. State-added questions were not evaluated by CDC and are not released in public-use data sets (6).

In 2015, certain states used a split questionnaire design. Up to three different questionnaire versions were permitted. Although core questions were required to be used in all versions, state-added questions and optional modules did not have this requirement. Using a split questionnaire design allowed states to include a larger variety of optional modules or state-added questions (6). CDC provided a Spanish translation of the BRFSS core questionnaire and optional modules in 2015. States could translate the BRFSS questionnaire into other languages (6).

Data Collection and Processing

Since 2007, BRFSS surveys have been collected monthly in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam. In 2015, all BRFSS interviews were conducted according to standard protocols, which ensure interview quality and confidentiality (9). Data collected by the states are submitted to CDC for processing, checking, and weighting.

Sampling

A BRFSS sample record was one telephone number in the list of all telephone numbers that were randomly selected for dialing (6). In 2015, Puerto Rico and Guam used simple random sampling to collect their landline samples, and all 50 states and the District of Columbia used disproportionate stratified sampling (DSS) for the landline portion of the sample. In the DSS approach, telephone numbers were separated into two strata (high-density and medium-density) on the basis of the number of listed telephone numbers in their hundred block. Both strata were expected to contain mostly household telephone numbers, but high-density strata were sampled at a higher rate than medium-density strata (6). The DSS design resulted in a probability sample of all households with telephones (6).

Cellular telephone sampling frames were provided by the Telecordia database of telephone exchanges. Cell phone numbers were randomly selected from these sampling frames (6). The target population for the cellular telephone sample was adults aged ≥18 years with a functioning cell phone who resided in a private residence or college housing. The states’ cell phone samples often reached adults who had moved to a different state. These records were transferred to the appropriate state (i.e., the participant’s state of residence) at the end of the year. In 2015, a total of 46 states or territories (all except the District of Columbia, Florida, Guam, North Dakota, Oregon, West Virginia, and Wyoming) sampled disproportionately by geographic stratum to ensure adequate sample sizes in sub-state geographic regions (6).

Data Weighting

Design Weights

BRFSS created design weights that account for unequal selection probabilities, noncoverage, and nonresponse (6). Design weights of dual cell phone and landline users were adjusted to account for the complete overlap of cell phone and landline sampling frames. Design weights were truncated by quartile within geographic region or state (6). BRFSS used weight trimming to reduce the value of extremely high weights and to increase the value of extremely low weights, with the objective of reducing errors in prevalence estimates (6).

Raking

Beginning in 2011, BRFSS data have been weighted using a process known as iterative proportional fitting (“raking”), rather than previous poststratification methods. In the past, BRFSS poststratification weights were based only on three sociodemographic characteristics: age, sex, and race/ethnicity. In contrast, the new raking process permits the inclusion of additional sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., marital status and home ownership) as well as cellular telephone survey data (10). Raking allows the sociodemographic makeup of BRFSS to more closely match the known sociodemographic makeup of states and MMSAs (10).

The 2015 BRFSS data were raked using the following demographic characteristics: sex by age group, race/ ethnicity, education, marital status, home renter/owner, sex by race/ethnicity, age group by race/ethnicity, and phone ownership (6). If states collected BRFSS data by geographic region, then BRFSS data were raked by four additional margins: region, region by age group, region by sex, and region by race/ethnicity (6). BRFSS data were raked to each of these margins in an iterative process until a convergence of a set value was reached.

Persons were assigned to MMSAs on the basis of American National Standards Institute county codes (7). For MMSAs with ≥500 respondents, BRFSS data were raked by five additional margins at the MMSA level: age group, sex, race/ethnicity, sex by age group, and sex by race/ethnicity (7). More detailed information on MMSA weighting is located on the BRFSS SMART webpage (11).

Statistical Analyses

Age adjustment is a standard analytical technique used to compare estimates between populations with different age distributions (e.g., between states) and over time. In this report, prevalence estimates were directly age adjusted so that the reader can compare estimates across states and MMSAs with different age distributions. Age adjusted prevalence estimates were standardized to the 2000 projected U.S. population, which is consistent with recommendations from the CDC National Center for Health Statistics (12).

For prevalence estimates among adults aged ≥18 years, three age adjustment categories were used: 18–44 years (standardized proportion: 0.5305), 45–64 years (standardized proportion: 0.2992), and ≥65 years (standardized proportion: 0.1703). For prevalence estimates among adults aged 18–64 years, two age adjustment categories were used: 18–44 years (standardized proportion: 0.6394) and 45–64 years (standardized proportion: 0.3606). For prevalence estimates among adults aged ≥45 years, four age adjustment categories were used: 45–54 years (standardized proportion: 0.3869), 55–64 years (standardized proportion: 0.2504), 65–74 years (standardized proportion: 0.1895), and ≥75 years (standardized proportion: 0.1732). Age-adjusted prevalence estimates are taken from direct responses and are not the results of modeling. Age was imputed for the limited number of persons who were missing data on age. To account for BRFSS’s complex sampling design, all prevalence estimates in this report were calculated using weights and strata in SAS version 9.3 (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, North Carolina) or SAS-callable SUDAAN Version 11 (RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina). Crude (unadjusted) estimates for each state and MMSA are available on the BRFSS website (13). Most prior BRFSS reports (i.e., those reporting on 2012 survey data and earlier) included crude prevalence estimates rather than age-adjusted prevalence estimates. The age-adjusted prevalence estimates in this BRFSS report should not be directly compared with crude prevalence estimates in most prior BRFSS reports.

This report presents unweighted sample sizes; age-adjusted, weighted prevalence estimates with standard errors; and 95% confidence intervals for the prevalence of chronic health conditions, health-risk behaviors, and use of preventive health care services by state, territory, and MMSA using 2015 BRFSS data. Only MMSAs with ≥500 respondents are included in this report. County-level estimates are not presented in this report. Modeled small area estimates at the county level will be released at a future date.

If the unweighted sample size of any jurisdiction or subpopulation was <50 or if the relative standard error was >30%, the findings were suppressed to avoid unstable estimates. Relative standard error was calculated by dividing the standard error of the estimated prevalence by the estimated prevalence and multiplying by 100 (for percent). Responses coded as “refused” or “do not know” were excluded from the given analysis.

About This Report

This report presents age-adjusted prevalence estimates and a discussion of the following topics: 1) health status indicators (general health status, poor physical health, poor mental health, and health care coverage for adults aged 18–64 years), 2) preventive practices (recent routine physical checkup, ever having blood cholesterol checked), 3) health-risk behaviors (current cigarette smoking, binge drinking, no leisure-time physical activity, consuming fruit less than once per day, and consuming vegetables less than once per day), and 4) chronic conditions (among adults aged ≥18 years: obesity, arthritis, depressive disorder, high blood pressure, and high blood cholesterol; among adults aged ≥45 years: diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke). Respondents self-reported their height and weight. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated by dividing weight (in kilograms) by height (in meters) squared. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2. The prevalence of all other chronic conditions was based on self-report of the specific condition: i.e., participants were asked if they had ever been told by a health professional that they had the specific condition. Selected chronic conditions (e.g., coronary heart disease) were evaluated among adults aged ≥45 years because the prevalence of these conditions is so low among adults aged 18–44 years. For instance, the prevalences of coronary heart disease and stroke were less than 1% among adults aged 18–44 years in the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (14).

The 2015 BRFSS questionnaire and all related support documents can be accessed from the BRFSS webpage (15). Crude (unadjusted) prevalence estimates for selected health indicators are presented on the BRFSS website (13).

Results

In 2015, approximately 441,000 adults completed BRFSS interviews via landline or cellular telephone. A total of 254,645 respondents completed landline telephone interviews, and the numbers of participants ranged from 1,259 in Guam to 11,356 in Kansas (median: 4,048). For the cellular telephone survey, a total of 186,811 respondents completed interviews, and the numbers of participants ranged from 410 in Guam to 11,880 in Kansas (median: 2,924).

Response rates for BRFSS were calculated using standards set by the American Association of Public Opinion Research Response Rate Formula 4 (RR4), which is the number of respondents who completed the survey as a proportion of all eligible and likely-eligible persons (16). The RR4 response rate for the landline survey ranged from 31.6% in Alabama to 63.7% in Utah (median: 48.2%), whereas the RR4 response rate for the cellular telephone survey ranged from 33.6% in California to 69.6% in Alaska (median: 47.2%). The RR4 response rate for the combined sample, which was weighted by the respective size of the two samples, ranged from 33.9% in California to 61.1% in Utah (median: 47.2%). More detailed information on response rates, cooperation rates, interview completion rates, and eligibility factors is included in the 2015 BRFSS Summary Data Quality Report (17).

Health Status Indicators

General Health Status

In the 2015 BRFSS, adults aged ≥18 years were asked to rate their general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Among 53 states and U.S. territories in 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults who reported good or better health ranged from 65.9% in Puerto Rico to 88.8% in New Hampshire (median: 84.6%) (Table 1). Among 130 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs) with ≥500 respondents in the 2015 BRFSS, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults reporting good, very good, or excellent health ranged from 66.9% in San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico, to 91.3% in Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont (median: 85.2%) (Table 2).

Poor Physical Health

Respondents aged ≥18 years were asked for how many of the past 30 days their physical health was not good. Poor physical health was defined as physical illness or injury. Among 53 states and U.S. territories in 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults reporting ≥14 days of poor physical health in the past 30 days ranged from 8.2% in North Dakota to 17.2% in West Virginia (median: 10.9%) (Table 3). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 6.6% in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California, to 19.1% in Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 10.9%) (Table 4).

Poor Mental Health

Poor mental health was defined as stress, depression, or problems with emotions. Respondents were asked for how many of the past 30 days their mental health was not good. In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported ≥14 days of poor mental health during the past 30 days ranged from 7.3% in South Dakota to 15.8% in West Virginia (median: 11.3%) (Table 5). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 5.6% in Rochester, Minnesota, to 20.5% in Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia (median: 11.4%) (Table 6).

Health Care Coverage

Health care coverage was defined as having health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid). In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults aged 18–64 who had health care coverage ranged from 72.0% in Texas to 93.8% in Massachusetts (median: 86.8%) (Table 7). Among 130 selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of 18–64 year-olds with health care coverage ranged from 63.2% in El Paso, Texas, to 95.7% in Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania (median: 86.8%) (Table 8).

Preventive Practices

Recent Routine Physical Checkup

In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months ranged from 58.1% in Alaska to 79.8% in Rhode Island (median: 69.0%) (Table 9). Among selected MMSAs, the 2015 age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 57.1% in Spartanburg, South Carolina, to 81.1% in Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts (median: 69.4%) (Table 10).

Ever Had Blood Cholesterol Checked

In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported ever having their blood cholesterol checked ranged from 73.3% in New Mexico to 86.7% in the District of Columbia (median: 79.1%) (Table 11). Among 130 selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 65.1% in Logan, Utah-Idaho to 87.3% in Raleigh, North Carolina (median: 79.5%) (Table 12).

Health-Risk Behaviors

Current Cigarette Smoking

Adults were considered current smokers if they reported having smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and currently smoked every day or on certain days. In 2015, the estimated age-adjusted prevalence of current smoking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 9.0% in Utah to 27.2% in West Virginia (median: 17.7%) (Table 13). Among 130 selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of current smokers ranged from 4.5% in Logan, Utah-Idaho, to 29.5% in Akron, Ohio (median: 17.3%) (Table 14).

Binge Drinking

Males were considered binge drinkers if they had five or more drinks on one or more occasions during the past 30 days. Females were considered binge drinkers if they had four or more drinks on one or more occasions during the past 30 days. The age-adjusted prevalence estimates of binge drinking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 11.2% in Tennessee to 26.0% in the District of Columbia in 2015 (median: 17.2%) (Table 15). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults who reported binge drinking ranged from 5.5% in Provo-Orem, Utah, to 24.5% in Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin (median: 17.4%) (Table 16).

No Leisure-Time Physical Activity

Respondents were asked if, during the past month, they participated in any physical activities or exercises (e.g., running, calisthenics, golfing, gardening, or walking for exercise) outside of their regular job. In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported no leisure time physical activity during the preceding month ranged from 17.6% in Colorado to 47.1% in Puerto Rico (median: 25.5%) (Table 17). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 16.1% in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California, to 47.3% in San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico (median: 24.5%) (Table 18).

Consuming Fruit Less than Once per Day

Adults aged ≥18 years were asked how frequently they consumed fruit (fresh, frozen, or canned) or 100% pure fruit juice during the preceding month. The age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults who consumed fruit or fruit juice less than once per day during the preceding month ranged from 33.3% in New Hampshire to 55.5% in Puerto Rico (median: 40.5%) (Table 19). Among 130 selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 30.1% in Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland, to 57.3% in Tuscaloosa, Alabama (median: 40.3%) (Table 20).

Consuming Vegetables Less than Once per Day

Respondents aged ≥18 years were asked how frequently they consumed dark green vegetables, orange-colored vegetables, beans, or other vegetables during the preceding month. In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults who reported consuming vegetables less than once per day during the preceding month ranged from 16.6% in Oregon to 31.3% in Mississippi (median: 22.4%) (Table 21). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 13.6% in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California to 32.0% in Jackson, Mississippi (median: 22.3%) (Table 22).

Chronic Conditions

Obesity

Obesity was defined as BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2 (BMI was calculated by dividing weight [in kilograms] by height [in meters] squared). Both height and weight were self-reported. In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of obesity among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 19.9% in Colorado to 36.0% in Louisiana (median: 29.5%) (Table 23). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of obesity among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 17.8% in Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California, to 41.6% in Corpus Christi, Texas (median: 28.5%) (Table 24).

Diabetes

Adults aged ≥45 years were considered to have diabetes if they had ever been told by a health professional that they had diabetes (excluding diabetes during pregnancy, prediabetes, or borderline diabetes in adults). Among adults aged ≥45 years, age-adjusted prevalence estimates of diabetes in 2015 ranged from 11.2% in Colorado to 26.8% in Puerto Rico (median: 15.9%) (Table 25). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 10.5% in Rochester, Minnesota, to 27.6% in Corpus Christi, Texas (median: 15.7%) (Table 26).

Arthritis

Respondents were identified as having a form of arthritis if they had ever been told by a health professional that they had arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. The 2015 age-adjusted prevalence estimates of arthritis among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 17.2% in Hawaii to 33.6% in West Virginia (median: 22.7%) (Table 27). Among selected MMSAs in 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of arthritis among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 12.3% in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California, to 33.9% in Charleston, West Virginia (median: 23.2%) (Table 28).

Depressive Disorder

Adults aged ≥18 years of age were identified as having a depressive disorder if they were ever told by a health professional that they had a depressive disorder (including depression, major depression, dysthymia, or minor depression). In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of depressive disorder ranged from 9.6% in Guam to 27.0% in Oregon (median: 19.0%) (Table 29). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of depressive disorder ranged from 9.9% in Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California, to 27.2% in Spartanburg, South Carolina (median: 19.2%) (Table 30).

High Blood Pressure

Respondents were considered to have high blood pressure if they had ever been told by a health professional that they had high blood pressure (excluding high blood pressure during pregnancy). The 2015 age-adjusted prevalence estimates of high blood pressure among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 24.2% in Minnesota to 39.9% in Mississippi (median: 29.1%) (Table 31). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates ranged from 19.7% in Rochester, Minnesota, to 41.0% in Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi (median: 29.0%) (Table 32).

High Blood Cholesterol

Adults were classified as having high cholesterol if, after having their blood cholesterol checked, they had ever been told by a health professional that their cholesterol was high. (Adults who had never had their blood cholesterol checked were excluded from analysis.) In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of high blood cholesterol among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 27.1% in Montana to 37.3% in Puerto Rico (median: 31.8%) (Table 33). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of high blood cholesterol ranged from 23.2% in Aberdeen, South Dakota, to 42.0% in Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii (median: 31.4%) (Table 34).

Coronary Heart Disease

Respondents were classified as having coronary heart disease if they had ever been told by a health professional that they had a heart attack (i.e., myocardial infarction) or angina. In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of coronary heart disease among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 7.2% in Hawaii to 16.8% in West Virginia (median: 10.3%) (Table 35). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥45 years who reported coronary heart disease ranged from 4.7% in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California, to 17.8% in Wichita Falls, Texas (median: 10.1%) (Table 36).

Stroke

Adults were classified as having had a stroke if they had ever been told by a health professional that they had a stroke. In 2015, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of stroke among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 2.5% in Puerto Rico to 7.5% in Mississippi (median: 4.9%) (Table 37). Among selected MMSAs, the age-adjusted prevalence estimates of stroke among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 2.1% in College Station-Bryan, Texas, to 8.4% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 4.7%) (Table 38).

Discussion

The findings in this report reveal considerable geographic variation in the age-adjusted estimated prevalence of health care access and use, health-risk behaviors, and chronic health conditions among U.S. adults at the state, territory, and MMSA level. Variations in age-adjusted prevalence estimates might be because of differences in sociodemographic characteristics, cultural contexts, behavioral risk factors for health conditions, health care access and affordability, state and municipal laws, or combinations of these factors. BRFSS is one of the main sources of health information at the state and local level. Prevalence estimates from BRFSS are used at the state and local level to monitor changes in population health status over time, to determine the needs of public health programming, and to evaluate the effectiveness of public health initiatives.

Health Status Indicators

Self-reported general health status is a strong risk factor for mortality independent of other medical and sociodemographic characteristics (18). Likewise, physical and mental healthy days measures are independent predictors of physician visits, hospitalization, and mortality (19). These self-reported health measures have been found to be reliable and valid (20,21). In the 2015 BRFSS, the estimated prevalence of self-reported fair or poor general health status ranged from 11.2% to 34.1% among states and territories and from 8.7% to 33.1% in selected MMSAs (i.e., this prevalence represents adults who did not report good or better general health status in Tables 1–2). The estimated prevalence of adults reporting poor physical or mental health for ≥14 of the last 30 days also varied by geographic region. To reduce the prevalence of poor physical and mental health status, it is essential to investigate and address the underlying causes of these conditions.

Health Care Coverage

According to BRFSS data, the median age-adjusted prevalence of health care coverage among adults aged 18–64 years increased from 78.4% in 2011 to 86.8% in 2015. The Affordable Care Act (ACA), passed in 2010, includes multiple provisions to increase access to health care coverage for the U.S. population. As of July 1, 2016, a total of 32 states had elected to expand Medicaid eligibility under ACA, extending eligibility to a new group of adults aged <65 years with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level (22). In addition, ACA offers tax credits to numerous families who purchase insurance coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace to subsidize the cost of premiums (23). Furthermore, ACA prevents health insurers from denying coverage or charging more because of a pre-existing condition (24). ACA also requires insurers to allow children to remain on their parents’ health insurance plans until age 26 years (25). As of March 2016, the number of uninsured persons in the United States (of all ages) had decreased by 21.3 million since the enactment of ACA (26). Despite this progress, approximately 13.2% (age-adjusted prevalence estimate) of adults aged 18–64 lacked health insurance coverage in 2015. Not having health insurance is associated with higher morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life (27). Additional work to enhance insurance affordability and coverage might generate essential gains in health and other outcomes.

Recent Routine Physical Checkup

Although routine checkups are no longer generally recommended, they might provide opportunities to deliver certain types of high-value care (e.g., early detection of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cancer, and other adverse health conditions), establish relationships between patients and providers, and gauge access to or use of health care (28,29). In 2015, a large proportion of U.S. adults (up to 41.9% in Alaska) had not visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding year. Lack of health insurance and transportation are barriers to health care for many adults (27,30). In addition, adults might not be aware of free or low-cost health care options in their community. The Health Resources and Services Administration provides a list of these health care centers by geographic region (31).

Current Cigarette Smoking

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States (32). Annually, approximately 480,000 U.S. deaths are attributable to smoking or exposure to tobacco smoke; approximately 9% of these are caused by second-hand smoke (33). Smoking causes coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancers of the lung, colon, stomach, and other areas of the body (34). Approximately 80% of lung cancer deaths among U.S. adults aged ≥35 years are attributable to smoking (33). During 2013–2015, the median age-adjusted prevalence estimate of current smoking decreased from 19.3% to 17.7%. However, the 2015 prevalence is still substantially higher than the Healthy People 2020 goal of ≤12.0% (35). Culturally appropriate tobacco prevention and control programs are needed, particularly among subgroups at high risk for tobacco use (e.g., adults of low socioeconomic status) (36). Tobacco prevention campaigns that discourage smoking initiation among adolescents might reduce the number of future adult smokers (37). More data are needed on the prevalence of electronic cigarette and marijuana use, which appear to be increasing (38,39). In 2016, BRFSS added questions about electronic cigarettes to the core questionnaire. Marijuana use was added as an optional BRFSS module in 2016.

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking costs the U.S. economy approximately $191 billion annually (40). Binge drinking increases the risk for alcohol poisoning, injury (e.g., falls and motor vehicle accidents), high blood pressure, and liver damage (41). Binge drinking also can contribute to sexually transmitted diseases and unplanned pregnancy (41). Younger adults are more likely to binge drink than older adults, but binge drinking remains a problem throughout life (42). Among states and territories in the 2015 BRFSS, 11.2%–26.0% of adults engaged in binge drinking within 30 days of participating in the survey. Health care systems could screen for and counsel about risky or hazardous drinking (43). At the population level, certain policies have been proven effective against binge drinking. For instance, increasing alcohol taxes and limiting days or hours of sale are effective interventions against alcohol misuse (44).

No Leisure-Time Physical Activity

Physical activity might help reduce the risk for weight gain, high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and various types of cancers (45). Federal guidelines recommend that adults engage in ≥2.5 hours of moderate intensity aerobic activity (e.g., brisk walking) or ≥1.25 hours of vigorous intensity aerobic activity (e.g., running) or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity per week. In addition, adults should perform muscle-strengthening activities at least 2 days each week (46). In 2015, the proportion of adults who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the preceding month was substantial (median: 25.5%). Community-level policies that increase access to sidewalks, bicycle lanes, outdoor recreation spaces, and safe neighborhoods might help facilitate physical activity among U.S. adults (47).

No Daily Fruit or Vegetable Consumption

Regular fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with reduced risk for obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and various cancers (48,49). Fruits and vegetables are rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, which have myriad health benefits (48,49). For example, certain fruits and vegetables are major sources of vitamin C, which plays an important role in tissue repair (48,49). Federal guidelines for fruit and vegetable consumption vary by age, sex, and level of physical activity (50). Sedentary adults (i.e., those who obtain less than 30 minutes of moderate exercise daily, not counting regular daily activities) should consume between 1.5 and 2 cup-equivalents of fruit per day and between 2 and 3 cup-equivalents of vegetables per day (50). Moderately active and active adults, who have increased caloric needs, should consume larger quantities (50). Results from the 2015 BRFSS indicate that a large proportion of U.S. adults fail to meet these guidelines. Among states and territories, 33.3%–55.5% of adults reported consuming fruit less than once daily during the preceding month, and 16.6%–31.3% of adults reported consuming vegetables less than once daily during the preceding month. The United States Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate campaign encourages adults to fill half of their plates with fruits and vegetables and provides consumers with tips on how to increase consumption of healthy foods (51). In addition, the 2015–2020 Federal Dietary Guidelines describe strategies that persons, schools, workplaces, food retailers, and communities can implement to increase healthy eating (50).

Obesity

Obesity increases the risks for coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, and type 2 diabetes, all of which are leading causes of death (1). Obesity is also associated with increased risk for metabolic syndrome, high blood pressure, and osteoarthritis (52). Annual obesity-related health care costs in the United States were estimated at $147 billion as of 2008 (53). Modifiable risk factors for obesity include sedentary lifestyle, excess caloric intake, and lack of sleep (54). Community-level interventions for obesity prevention include improving access to healthy foods and beverages and enhancing community infrastructure to support walking or bicycling (55,56).

Diabetes

Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States (1). Approximately 29 million persons in the United States have diabetes (57). An additional 86 million have prediabetes; of these, 90% are unaware that they have this condition (58). Complications of diabetes include cardiovascular diseases, blindness, kidney failure, and amputation of extremities (58). Diagnosed diabetes costs the United States approximately $245 billion in medical costs and lost productivity per year (59). The age-adjusted prevalence estimate of diabetes among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 11.2% to 26.8% among states and territories in the 2015 BFRSS. Interventions that promote physical activity and reduce obesity might be helpful in preventing diabetes. For persons at high risk, lifestyle interventions (e.g., the CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program) are proven to help adults with prediabetes prevent type 2 diabetes by exercising, eating healthier, and losing weight (60).

Arthritis

There are approximately 100 types of arthritis, which is characterized by inflammation of the joints or connective tissue (e.g., cartilage) surrounding joints (61). Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis (61). Common arthritis symptoms include joint pain, stiffness, and swelling (61). Approximately 40% of adults with arthritis encounter activity limitations (62), and approximately 30% experience work limitations (63). The age-adjusted prevalence estimates of arthritis among adults aged ≥18 years in 2015 ranged from 17.2% to 33.6% among states and territories. Women, older adults, and persons who have obesity are at increased risk for receiving an arthritis diagnosis (62,64). Physical activity and maintaining a healthy body weight might help arthritis patients successfully manage their condition (64,65).

Depressive Disorder

An estimated 16.1 million U.S. adults (6.7%) had one or more major depressive episodes in 2015 (66). Women and younger adults were at increased risk (66). The estimated lifetime prevalence of depressive disorder ranged from 9.6% to 27.0% among states and territories in the 2015 BRFSS. Depression is associated with increased risk for anxiety disorders, sleep disturbance, substance abuse, smoking, and obesity (67). In the workplace, depression is associated with unemployment and lost productivity (67). Depression is also a risk factor for cardiovascular disease-related mortality and suicide (67). Approximately half of adults with depression do not seek treatment (68). Reducing stigma related to mental illness and increasing access to mental health care could help adults with depression better manage this condition.

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure increases the risk for coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease, and stroke (69). The estimated prevalence of high blood pressure was high in the 2015 BRFSS (median: 29.1% among states and territories). Approximately 17% of adults with high blood pressure remain undiagnosed (70). Enhancing systematic approaches to screening and treatment of hypertension in health care and community settings could improve high blood pressure detection and control (7173). Public health initiatives should emphasize the importance of modifiable risk factors for high blood pressure, which include obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes, excess sodium consumption, excess alcohol use, and smoking (74). Addressing these lifestyle factors might also help adults with high blood pressure control their blood pressure (75).

Cholesterol Screening and High Blood Cholesterol

High blood cholesterol is associated with increased risk for coronary heart disease and stroke (76). Risk factors for high blood cholesterol include obesity, diabetes, lack of exercise, smoking, and a diet high in trans fat and saturated fat (77). The age-adjusted prevalence estimates of high cholesterol in adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 27.1% to 37.3% among states and territories in the 2015 BRFSS. Because high blood cholesterol is an asymptomatic condition, regular risk assessment, testing, and appropriate treatment is essential (78). Low-risk adults aged 40–75 years (i.e., adults who do not have heart disease, do not have diabetes, do not consume cholesterol medication, and who have low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol between 70–189 mg/dL) should have their blood cholesterol checked every 4 to 6 years (79). The potential benefits of cholesterol screening among low-risk younger adults is unknown (80). In 2015, 20.9% of the U.S. adult population reported that they had never had their blood cholesterol checked, and approximately 24% reported not having their blood cholesterol checked during the preceding 5 years (median age-adjusted prevalence at the state level). Furthermore, approximately half of U.S. adults with high cholesterol are not treated for this disorder (81). Health care system approaches to enhancing risk assessment, screening, and treatment for high cholesterol could help.

Coronary Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In 2015, approximately 633,000 persons died because of heart disease in the United States; approximately 365,000 of these deaths were attributed to coronary heart disease (1). The median age-adjusted prevalence of coronary heart disease among adults aged ≥45 years was approximately 10% among states and territories in the 2015 BRFSS, and there were notable disparities by geographic region. Adults in the southern United States had a higher prevalence of coronary heart disease compared with adults in other parts of the United States. The highest prevalence was in West Virginia, where 16.8% of adults aged ≥45 years reported a history of coronary heart disease. Adults residing in the southern United States are also more likely to die from heart disease, compared with adults in other parts of the country (82). During 2012–2013, heart disease cost the U.S. economy approximately $199.6 billion annually. In addition, health costs of coronary heart disease specifically are predicted to double during 2013–2030 (83). Medical risk factors for coronary heart disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and obesity (84,85). Engaging in regular physical activity, eating a healthy diet (e.g., high in fruits and vegetables, low in red meats, and low in added sugars) and avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption might reduce the risk for coronary heart disease (85,86).

Stroke

Stroke was the fourth most frequent cause of death among adults aged ≥45 years in 2015 (1). Stroke is also a leading cause of disability (87). The direct and indirect costs of stroke cost the U.S. economy approximately $34 billion each year (83). In 2015, approximately 5% of U.S. adults aged ≥45 years reported having a history of stroke (median age-adjusted prevalence at the state level). Stroke prevalence is higher among older adults, blacks, American Indians/Alaska natives, and those without a high school diploma (87). Risk factors for stroke include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, smoking, and physical inactivity (88,89).

Limitations

The findings in this report are subject to at least five limitations. First, these findings might not be generalizable to the U.S. population because the BRFSS survey design excludes persons who reside in military installations, correctional institutions, long-term care facilities, and nursing homes. Adults without telephone access are also excluded from the BRFSS. An estimated 2.4% of the U.S. population and approximately 5.7% of Puerto Rico’s population did not have telephone access in 2015 (6).

Second, prevalence estimates from the BRFSS are based on self-reporting, which is likely to be less accurate than physical measurements (4). For example, survey respondents underreport their weight (90), recent alcohol intake (91), and tobacco use (92), and they overreport physical activity (93). These tendencies might be related to concerns about social desirability (4,94). Alternatively, respondents might have trouble recalling their past health behaviors or receipt of health care services, or they might not be aware of their underlying health conditions (e.g., high blood pressure) (4).

Third, the prevalence of chronic diseases might be underestimated in the BRFSS. BRFSS prevalence estimates are estimates of diagnosed disease. Multiple chronic diseases remain undiagnosed for long periods of time, so the actual prevalence of these conditions might be higher than what is captured in BRFSS.

Fourth, although BRFSS surveys are conducted in several languages other than English (i.e., Spanish, Mandarin, and Portuguese), the survey does not apply to persons who exclusively speak languages not represented in the BRFSS. Finally, because of small sample sizes or unstable estimates, the prevalence of certain conditions (e.g., stroke) could not be estimated for particular MMSAs.

The BRFSS data set has various strengths. BRFSS data have been shown to be valid and reliable for certain indicators (4). With certain exceptions, many prevalence estimates from the BRFSS are comparable to those of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and National Health Interview Survey, which are conducted using face-to-face interviews (9597). However, obesity prevalence estimates in BRFSS (which are based on self-reported height and weight) are approximately 4%–10% lower than obesity prevalence estimates in NHANES (which are based on measured height and weight) (95,98). In addition, the estimated prevalence of U.S. adults who are physically active was 15%–18% higher in the 2005 BRFSS than in the 2005 National Health Interview Survey or 2005–2006 NHANES (99).

Questions on the BRFSS are cognitively tested to optimize the validity of survey response (6). Likewise, BRFSS interviewers are thoroughly trained, and their performance regularly evaluated, to ensure interview quality (6).

BRFSS is the largest continuously conducted, health-based telephone survey in the world (3) with approximately 440,000 interviews conducted in 2015. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam collected data via both landline and cell phones in 2015 (6). The telephone-based approach of BRFSS is cost-effective (3). BRFSS data are used in numerous capacities at the state and local level, including surveillance, needs assessments, and program evaluations (3).

Conclusion

This report highlights the estimated prevalence of selected chronic diseases, health-risk behaviors, and health care access and use among adults residing in the United States in 2015. The chronic conditions in this report are leading causes of U.S. morbidity and mortality. However, many of these conditions can be effectively managed or prevented through lifestyle modifications (e.g., avoiding tobacco use) and use of preventive health care services (e.g., blood pressure screening). Since 1984, BRFSS has been a unique source of data on chronic diseases and their risk factors. States and municipalities use BRFSS data to monitor health conditions and behaviors over time, design public health initiatives, conduct public health needs assessments, and evaluate the impact of public health programs and policies.

Acknowledgments

States and territories BRFSS coordinators; Population Health Surveillance Branch, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC; A contributor to previous versions of the report is David Flegel, Population Health Surveillance Branch, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC and Northrop Grumman Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia.

Conflict of Interest

No conflicts of interest were reported.


Corresponding author: Cassandra M. Pickens, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC. Telephone: 404-498-1702; E-mail: kdv2@cdc.gov.

1Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC; 2TEKsystems and Northrop Grumman Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia

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TABLE 1. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,911 79.0 0.6 (77.8–80.2)
Alaska 3,647 86.2 0.8 (84.6–87.8)
Arizona 7,928 81.8 0.6 (80.6–83.1)
Arkansas 5,238 77.5 1.0 (75.6–79.4)
California 12,588 82.4 0.4 (81.5–83.2)
Colorado 13,487 86.4 0.5 (85.5–87.3)
Connecticut 11,872 85.9 0.5 (85.0–86.8)
Delaware 4,060 83.2 0.9 (81.4–84.9)
District of Columbia 3,986 87.4 0.9 (85.6–89.3)
Florida 9,709 82.9 0.6 (81.7–84.0)
Georgia 4,667 82.5 0.7 (81.1–83.9)
Hawaii 7,157 86.9 0.5 (85.9–88.0)
Idaho 5,784 86.0 0.6 (84.7–87.2)
Illinois 5,287 84.3 0.7 (83.0–85.6)
Indiana 6,050 82.0 0.7 (80.6–83.5)
Iowa 6,206 87.9 0.5 (86.8–88.9)
Kansas 23,182 85.0 0.3 (84.4–85.5)
Kentucky 8,788 79.3 0.7 (78.0–80.6)
Louisiana 4,704 79.0 0.8 (77.5–80.5)
Maine 9,046 85.0 0.6 (83.7–86.2)
Maryland 12,574 86.8 0.6 (85.6–88.0)
Massachusetts 9,260 86.0 0.5 (84.9–87.0)
Michigan 8,920 83.3 0.5 (82.3–84.3)
Minnesota 16,717 88.2 0.3 (87.5–88.8)
Mississippi 6,014 77.7 0.7 (76.2–79.1)
Missouri 7,292 83.2 0.6 (82.0–84.4)
Montana 6,038 85.8 0.7 (84.5–87.2)
Nebraska 17,539 86.7 0.4 (85.9–87.5)
Nevada 2,916 82.8 1.1 (80.6–85.1)
New Hampshire 7,013 88.8 0.6 (87.6–89.9)
New Jersey 11,427 84.8 0.5 (83.8–85.8)
New Mexico 6,725 80.2 0.7 (78.7–81.6)
New York 12,290 83.8 0.5 (82.9–84.7)
North Carolina 6,677 81.8 0.6 (80.7–82.9)
North Dakota 4,954 86.6 0.6 (85.3–87.8)
Ohio 11,900 84.7 0.6 (83.6–85.8)
Oklahoma 6,920 79.0 0.7 (77.6–80.5)
Oregon 5,333 82.2 0.7 (80.8–83.7)
Pennsylvania 5,723 84.8 0.6 (83.5–86.0)
Rhode Island 6,193 84.6 0.7 (83.2–86.0)
South Carolina 11,546 83.3 0.5 (82.3–84.2)
South Dakota 7,217 87.2 0.7 (85.8–88.6)
Tennessee 5,960 80.1 0.7 (78.7–81.6)
Texas 14,562 80.8 0.6 (79.6–82.0)
Utah 11,376 87.2 0.4 (86.4–88.0)
Vermont 6,471 88.6 0.5 (87.7–89.6)
Virginia 8,623 85.3 0.5 (84.3–86.3)
Washington 16,079 85.7 0.4 (84.9–86.5)
West Virginia 5,940 76.3 0.6 (75.0–77.5)
Wisconsin 6,177 86.1 0.6 (84.9–87.3)
Wyoming 5,474 85.7 0.8 (84.2–87.2)
Guam 1,666 79.5 1.6 (76.5–82.6)
Puerto Rico 5,396 65.9 0.7 (64.5–67.4)
Median 84.6
Range 65.9–88.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those who reported good, very good, or excellent health.

TABLE 2. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 577 90.1 1.4 (87.4–92.8)
Akron, Ohio 506 87.0 2.1 (82.9–91.1)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 925 87.5 1.6 (84.4–90.6)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,460 83.0 1.3 (80.4–85.6)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 815 82.6 2.7 (77.4–87.9)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,065 86.5 1.3 (84.0–89.1)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,035 86.9 0.9 (85.1–88.7)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 791 81.4 2.3 (77.0–85.9)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,868 84.6 1.2 (82.2–87.0)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,608 85.7 1.0 (83.8–87.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 646 82.0 1.7 (78.6–85.4)
Billings, Montana 679 86.0 1.7 (82.7–89.3)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,338 81.9 1.3 (79.3–84.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 875 88.2 1.4 (85.5–90.9)
Boise City, Idaho 1,460 87.8 1.1 (85.6–90.0)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,474 86.3 0.9 (84.4–88.1)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 749 81.4 2.1 (77.3–85.5)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,788 91.3 0.8 (89.8–92.8)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,907 87.7 0.9 (85.9–89.5)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,571 86.2 1.1 (84.0–88.5)
Charleston, West Virginia 885 75.4 1.8 (71.9–78.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,578 84.8 1.1 (82.5–87.0)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,011 83.1 1.2 (80.8–85.4)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,684 83.6 0.8 (82.0–85.2)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,685 86.9 1.1 (84.8–89.1)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,612 88.8 0.8 (87.2–90.5)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,055 83.7 1.7 (80.5–87.0)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 546 87.3 2.8 (81.7–92.8)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,442 82.4 1.5 (79.4–85.4)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,250 86.4 1.2 (84.1–88.7)
Columbus, Ohio 1,805 85.6 1.2 (83.2–87.9)
Corpus Christi, Texas 561 71.9 3.8 (64.5–79.4)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,294 83.5 1.9 (79.8–87.2)
Dayton, Ohio 568 87.8 1.8 (84.4–91.3)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,922 87.5 0.6 (86.3–88.7)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,074 88.9 1.3 (86.3–91.4)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 966 83.3 1.8 (79.8–86.7)
El Paso, Texas 760 76.8 1.7 (73.6–80.1)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 994 87.6 1.3 (85.1–90.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 817 83.8 2.2 (79.6–88.1)
Florence, South Carolina 527 80.6 2.1 (76.4–84.8)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 610 87.4 1.8 (84.0–90.9)
Grand Island, Nebraska 780 84.0 1.8 (80.5–87.6)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 923 86.3 1.4 (83.5–89.1)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,492 84.5 1.3 (82.1–87.0)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 656 81.3 1.9 (77.6–85.1)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 787 81.5 3.2 (75.2–87.9)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,992 86.9 0.7 (85.4–88.3)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 625 85.8 2.2 (81.5–90.0)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,105 80.8 1.7 (77.5–84.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,234 75.3 1.6 (72.2–78.3)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 567 87.4 1.7 (84.0–90.8)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 2,005 84.4 1.1 (82.1–86.6)
Jackson, Mississippi 717 76.8 2.0 (72.8–80.8)
Jacksonville, Florida 674 83.0 2.0 (79.0–86.9)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,304 88.0 1.2 (85.7–90.3)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,711 85.6 0.8 (84.1–87.2)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 518 86.3 1.7 (82.9–89.6)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 517 79.2 2.6 (74.2–84.2)
Knoxville, Tennessee 575 82.5 2.0 (78.6–86.4)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,793 91.1 0.8 (89.5–92.8)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,139 79.1 2.1 (75.0–83.3)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 583 89.6 1.4 (86.8–92.3)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,997 80.9 0.9 (79.1–82.7)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,817 80.8 1.5 (77.8–83.8)
Manhattan, Kansas 701 89.0 1.4 (86.3–91.7)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,072 80.7 1.8 (77.2–84.3)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 2,092 83.4 1.1 (81.1–85.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,640 84.1 1.6 (81.0–87.1)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,674 89.1 0.4 (88.3–90.0)
Minot, North Dakota 519 82.8 2.4 (78.0–87.6)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 516 85.5 2.1 (81.4–89.5)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 1,010 83.4 1.8 (79.9–86.9)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,075 86.9 1.3 (84.4–89.4)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,470 88.0 1.1 (85.9–90.2)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,659 84.0 1.0 (82.0–86.1)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 977 81.2 1.5 (78.3–84.2)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,312 82.9 0.6 (81.8–84.0)
Norfolk, Nebraska 740 88.9 1.3 (86.3–91.5)
North Platte, Nebraska 657 84.4 1.8 (80.9–87.9)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 942 89.4 1.4 (86.6–92.1)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,079 88.3 0.8 (86.7–89.9)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,031 82.6 1.2 (80.3–84.9)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 4,023 85.7 0.8 (84.1–87.3)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 997 81.7 1.7 (78.4–85.1)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 801 84.0 1.6 (80.9–87.1)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,975 83.0 0.8 (81.5–84.5)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,268 84.2 1.4 (81.6–86.9)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,679 87.5 1.1 (85.4–89.7)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,216 83.7 0.9 (81.9–85.6)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 7,090 85.2 0.8 (83.7–86.7)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,779 89.0 0.9 (87.2–90.7)
Raleigh, North Carolina 684 86.7 1.5 (83.8–89.6)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,329 86.4 1.5 (83.6–89.3)
Reno, Nevada 935 84.8 1.6 (81.7–87.9)
Richmond, Virginia 1,372 87.8 1.0 (85.8–89.9)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,493 77.0 1.4 (74.3–79.7)
Rochester, Minnesota 689 91.1 1.1 (88.9–93.3)
Rochester, New York 781 87.1 1.6 (83.9–90.3)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 2,005 88.4 1.2 (86.0–90.7)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,033 85.2 1.2 (82.8–87.5)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 631 89.8 1.3 (87.3–92.3)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,231 85.9 1.0 (84.0–87.8)
Salina, Kansas 505 85.9 1.7 (82.6–89.2)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,062 82.7 1.6 (79.5–85.8)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,081 86.5 0.7 (85.2–87.8)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 774 78.0 2.0 (74.1–81.9)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 576 90.7 1.4 (88.0–93.3)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 657 89.2 1.4 (86.4–92.0)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,413 66.9 0.9 (65.1–68.7)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 672 80.3 2.0 (76.3–84.2)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,778 88.1 0.6 (87.0–89.2)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,321 91.3 1.1 (89.1–93.6)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 929 91.0 1.4 (88.3–93.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,347 88.3 1.5 (85.4–91.1)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 499 79.6 2.5 (74.7–84.5)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,541 86.5 1.2 (84.2–88.8)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,192 80.9 1.8 (77.4–84.4)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,541 82.4 1.4 (79.6–85.2)
Toledo, Ohio 728 86.5 1.6 (83.4–89.7)
Topeka, Kansas 2,133 83.4 1.0 (81.4–85.5)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,581 79.6 1.5 (76.7–82.5)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 569 76.3 2.1 (72.1–80.5)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,765 85.7 1.0 (83.6–87.7)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,109 86.2 0.9 (84.4–88.1)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,961 88.1 0.7 (86.6–89.5)
Wichita, Kansas 4,732 85.2 0.6 (83.9–86.4)
Wichita Falls, Texas 579 80.4 3.4 (73.7–87.1)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,267 83.6 1.2 (81.2–86.1)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,573 83.9 1.3 (81.4–86.5)
Median 85.2
Range 66.9–91.3

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age standardized to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those who reported good, very good, or excellent health.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 3. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported ≥14 days of poor physical health in the past 30 days, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,715 14.2 0.5 (13.1–15.2)
Alaska 3,532 9.4 0.7 (8.1–10.7)
Arizona 7,762 11.5 0.5 (10.6–12.5)
Arkansas 5,074 14.1 0.8 (12.6–15.7)
California 12,486 10.9 0.4 (10.2–11.6)
Colorado 13,258 10.4 0.4 (9.7–11.2)
Connecticut 11,690 10.2 0.4 (9.4–11.0)
Delaware 3,965 10.1 0.6 (8.9–11.4)
District of Columbia 3,893 9.9 0.8 (8.3–11.6)
Florida 9,378 13.3 0.5 (12.2–14.3)
Georgia 4,574 11.7 0.6 (10.5–12.9)
Hawaii 7,126 8.7 0.5 (7.8–9.6)
Idaho 5,615 10.5 0.6 (9.4–11.6)
Illinois 5,243 9.9 0.5 (8.9–10.9)
Indiana 5,877 12.9 0.6 (11.6–14.1)
Iowa 6,109 9.1 0.5 (8.2–10.0)
Kansas 22,686 9.5 0.2 (9.1–10.0)
Kentucky 8,609 15.0 0.6 (13.8–16.1)
Louisiana 4,583 13.8 0.6 (12.6–15.1)
Maine 8,833 10.8 0.5 (9.9–11.8)
Maryland 12,295 10.8 0.6 (9.6–12.0)
Massachusetts 9,003 10.4 0.5 (9.5–11.3)
Michigan 8,805 12.2 0.4 (11.4–13.1)
Minnesota 16,460 9.1 0.3 (8.5–9.6)
Mississippi 5,870 14.2 0.6 (13.0–15.4)
Missouri 7,170 13.1 0.6 (12.0–14.2)
Montana 5,934 11.7 0.6 (10.5–12.9)
Nebraska 17,315 9.2 0.3 (8.6–9.9)
Nevada 2,849 12.1 1.0 (10.2–14.0)
New Hampshire 6,878 9.9 0.6 (8.8–11.0)
New Jersey 11,182 9.6 0.4 (8.8–10.4)
New Mexico 6,629 12.9 0.6 (11.8–14.0)
New York 11,926 11.6 0.4 (10.8–12.4)
North Carolina 6,550 12.5 0.5 (11.5–13.4)
North Dakota 4,833 8.2 0.5 (7.2–9.2)
Ohio 11,633 11.2 0.5 (10.3–12.1)
Oklahoma 6,811 14.2 0.6 (13.0–15.4)
Oregon 5,194 12.9 0.6 (11.7–14.0)
Pennsylvania 5,630 10.5 0.5 (9.5–11.6)
Rhode Island 6,026 12.2 0.6 (10.9–13.4)
South Carolina 11,281 12.2 0.4 (11.5–13.0)
South Dakota 7,124 9.3 0.6 (8.1–10.4)
Tennessee 5,791 15.6 0.7 (14.2–16.9)
Texas 14,249 11.0 0.4 (10.1–11.8)
Utah 11,195 9.7 0.3 (9.1–10.4)
Vermont 6,363 10.3 0.5 (9.3–11.3)
Virginia 8,494 9.8 0.4 (9.0–10.6)
Washington 15,826 10.8 0.3 (10.2–11.5)
West Virginia 5,866 17.2 0.6 (16.0–18.3)
Wisconsin 6,119 9.9 0.5 (8.9–10.9)
Wyoming 5,364 11.6 0.7 (10.2–13.0)
Guam 1,660 10.2 1.1 (8.0–12.5)
Puerto Rico 5,380 14.3 0.5 (13.2–15.3)
Median 10.9
Range 8.2–17.2

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Physical illness and injury.

TABLE 4. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported ≥14 days of poor physical health during the past 30 days, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 577 8.8 1.4 (6.1–11.6)
Akron, Ohio 493 11.5 2.1 (7.3–15.6)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 909 10.5 1.3 (8.0–13.0)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,451 10.9 1.0 (8.9–12.8)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 797 12.5 2.1 (8.4–16.7)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,029 8.5 1.0 (6.5–10.6)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,999 8.5 0.8 (7.0–10.0)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 773 13.5 2.2 (9.2–17.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,843 9.3 1.0 (7.3–11.3)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,503 11.4 0.9 (9.6–13.3)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 631 13.1 1.5 (10.1–16.1)
Billings, Montana 670 12.7 1.7 (9.3–16.1)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,314 13.0 1.2 (10.6–15.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 845 8.4 1.3 (5.9–10.9)
Boise City, Idaho 1,431 9.7 1.0 (7.7–11.6)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,381 10.0 0.8 (8.4–11.7)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 733 13.8 1.9 (10.0–17.6)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,762 8.5 0.8 (6.9–10.1)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,846 7.9 0.7 (6.6–9.3)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,544 9.2 0.9 (7.4–11.0)
Charleston, West Virginia 873 17.8 1.6 (14.7–20.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,549 10.4 0.9 (8.6–12.3)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,979 11.6 1.0 (9.6–13.5)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,632 10.1 0.6 (8.9–11.3)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,660 11.1 1.1 (9.0–13.2)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,586 11.1 1.1 (8.9–13.4)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,039 11.1 1.4 (8.3–13.9)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 540 9.4 2.1 (5.2–13.6)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,416 11.9 1.2 (9.5–14.3)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,227 12.7 1.2 (10.4–15.1)
Columbus, Ohio 1,767 10.1 1.0 (8.2–12.1)
Corpus Christi, Texas 553 16.1 2.3 (11.6–20.5)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,272 8.3 1.2 (5.9–10.7)
Dayton, Ohio 561 11.7 1.8 (8.1–15.3)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,813 10.0 0.6 (8.9–11.2)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,061 7.9 1.1 (5.7–10.1)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 941 12.0 1.4 (9.2–14.8)
El Paso, Texas 742 11.7 1.3 (9.1–14.3)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 982 7.2 1.0 (5.2–9.1)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 802 12.6 1.9 (8.9–16.4)
Florence, South Carolina 514 12.0 1.6 (8.9–15.0)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 590 8.4 1.4 (5.6–11.1)
Grand Island, Nebraska 767 9.9 1.6 (6.8–13.1)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 918 10.9 1.4 (8.2–13.5)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,469 10.8 1.0 (8.9–12.8)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 642 17.4 2.1 (13.3–21.5)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 771 12.2 1.7 (8.8–15.6)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,923 10.6 0.8 (9.1–12.2)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 614 9.1 1.7 (5.9–12.4)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,059 10.5 1.2 (8.2–12.8)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,213 15.8 1.3 (13.3–18.3)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 548 9.4 1.4 (6.7–12.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,955 12.8 1.2 (10.5–15.1)
Jackson, Mississippi 700 11.7 1.5 (8.8–14.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 661 12.7 1.8 (9.3–16.2)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,300 8.8 1.1 (6.7–10.9)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,574 10.6 0.7 (9.2–12.0)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 512 7.4 1.1 (5.1–9.6)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 502 19.1 3.1 (13.1–25.2)
Knoxville, Tennessee 564 15.0 1.9 (11.2–18.8)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,778 8.4 0.8 (6.8–10.1)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,107 11.6 1.5 (8.7–14.6)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 566 8.6 1.4 (5.9–11.3)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,977 10.6 0.7 (9.1–12.0)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,794 12.4 1.3 (9.9–14.9)
Manhattan, Kansas 691 8.1 1.2 (5.8–10.4)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,052 12.1 1.5 (9.1–15.0)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,995 12.5 1.1 (10.4–14.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,625 11.9 1.3 (9.4–14.4)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,553 8.1 0.4 (7.3–8.8)
Minot, North Dakota 511 8.0 1.4 (5.2–10.7)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 510 9.5 1.6 (6.3–12.7)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 995 15.0 1.6 (11.9–18.2)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,058 12.1 1.4 (9.4–14.8)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,439 9.8 1.1 (7.6–11.9)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,581 9.3 0.8 (7.7–10.9)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 965 14.0 1.4 (11.3–16.6)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,055 11.0 0.5 (10.1–11.9)
Norfolk, Nebraska 735 7.4 1.0 (5.4–9.5)
North Platte, Nebraska 647 13.6 1.9 (9.9–17.3)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 937 9.6 1.4 (6.9–12.2)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,052 10.0 0.8 (8.5–11.6)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,002 13.5 1.2 (11.2–15.8)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,979 9.4 0.6 (8.2–10.6)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 973 14.3 1.7 (10.9–17.7)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 781 11.1 1.3 (8.5–13.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,885 11.1 0.6 (10.0–12.2)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,253 10.9 1.1 (8.8–13.0)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,624 8.2 0.8 (6.7–9.8)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,148 11.0 0.7 (9.7–12.4)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,905 12.3 0.7 (11.0–13.7)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,765 7.3 0.7 (6.0–8.6)
Raleigh, North Carolina 670 10.5 1.3 (7.9–13.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,306 13.0 1.5 (10.1–15.9)
Reno, Nevada 915 11.5 1.4 (8.8–14.2)
Richmond, Virginia 1,355 9.9 1.0 (7.9–11.9)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,481 11.6 0.9 (9.8–13.5)
Rochester, Minnesota 682 8.0 1.1 (5.8–10.1)
Rochester, New York 759 11.8 1.5 (8.9–14.7)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,973 9.9 1.1 (7.8–12.0)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,020 11.3 1.2 (8.9–13.7)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 622 9.3 1.3 (6.7–11.8)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,209 11.4 0.8 (9.8–13.0)
Salina, Kansas 494 7.8 1.3 (5.3–10.2)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,003 12.8 1.8 (9.2–16.4)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,020 10.1 0.6 (9.0–11.2)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 764 13.7 1.6 (10.6–16.9)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 576 7.0 1.1 (4.8–9.2)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 656 6.6 1.0 (4.6–8.7)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,408 13.9 0.7 (12.5–15.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 669 12.2 1.6 (9.1–15.3)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,707 9.2 0.5 (8.2–10.2)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,280 8.9 1.3 (6.3–11.5)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 913 8.7 2.0 (4.7–12.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,330 8.1 1.2 (5.8–10.5)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 479 12.7 1.9 (9.0–16.4)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,520 11.4 1.1 (9.2–13.6)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,155 15.5 1.7 (12.2–18.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,486 13.4 1.3 (10.9–16.0)
Toledo, Ohio 720 10.9 1.4 (8.2–13.5)
Topeka, Kansas 2,082 10.1 0.8 (8.5–11.8)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,567 13.4 1.2 (11.0–15.8)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 562 13.9 1.7 (10.7–17.2)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,742 10.8 1.0 (8.9–12.7)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,078 10.3 0.8 (8.8–11.8)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,793 8.1 0.6 (7.0–9.2)
Wichita, Kansas 4,651 10.2 0.6 (9.1–11.3)
Wichita Falls, Texas 566 15.8 3.4 (9.1–22.5)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,217 10.6 1.1 (8.5–12.8)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,523 11.0 1.0 (9.1–13.0)
Median 10.9
Range 6.6–19.1

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Physical illness and injury.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 5. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported ≥14 days of poor mental health during the past 30 days, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,785 14.1 0.6 (12.9–15.3)
Alaska 3,568 10.9 0.9 (9.2–12.6)
Arizona 7,791 11.4 0.6 (10.2–12.5)
Arkansas 5,119 15.2 1.0 (13.2–17.1)
California 12,499 11.0 0.4 (10.2–11.7)
Colorado 13,299 10.5 0.4 (9.7–11.4)
Connecticut 11,732 11.5 0.5 (10.5–12.5)
Delaware 3,998 11.2 0.9 (9.5–12.9)
District of Columbia 3,913 10.1 0.9 (8.3–12.0)
Florida 9,501 13.5 0.6 (12.3–14.6)
Georgia 4,577 11.2 0.7 (9.8–12.5)
Hawaii 7,122 9.0 0.5 (8.0–10.1)
Idaho 5,700 10.5 0.6 (9.3–11.8)
Illinois 5,234 9.9 0.6 (8.7–11.0)
Indiana 5,950 12.5 0.7 (11.1–14.0)
Iowa 6,129 10.0 0.6 (8.8–11.1)
Kansas 22,856 9.9 0.3 (9.3–10.4)
Kentucky 8,651 13.9 0.7 (12.5–15.3)
Louisiana 4,631 14.3 0.7 (12.9–15.8)
Maine 8,904 12.3 0.6 (11.1–13.5)
Maryland 12,382 10.6 0.7 (9.3–11.9)
Massachusetts 9,084 11.8 0.6 (10.7–12.9)
Michigan 8,834 12.2 0.5 (11.2–13.1)
Minnesota 16,530 8.9 0.3 (8.3–9.5)
Mississippi 5,929 15.2 0.7 (13.7–16.6)
Missouri 7,190 13.2 0.6 (11.9–14.4)
Montana 5,960 11.1 0.7 (9.7–12.5)
Nebraska 17,369 9.0 0.4 (8.3–9.8)
Nevada 2,871 11.8 1.0 (9.7–13.8)
New Hampshire 6,900 11.2 0.7 (9.9–12.5)
New Jersey 11,232 10.8 0.5 (9.8–11.9)
New Mexico 6,651 11.3 0.6 (10.2–12.5)
New York 12,036 11.6 0.4 (10.7–12.4)
North Carolina 6,608 11.7 0.5 (10.7–12.7)
North Dakota 4,882 9.4 0.7 (8.1–10.7)
Ohio 11,701 12.3 0.6 (11.2–13.4)
Oklahoma 6,841 13.1 0.6 (11.9–14.4)
Oregon 5,240 13.9 0.7 (12.6–15.3)
Pennsylvania 5,646 11.8 0.6 (10.5–13.0)
Rhode Island 6,067 12.8 0.7 (11.3–14.2)
South Carolina 11,348 13.9 0.5 (12.9–14.9)
South Dakota 7,119 7.3 0.6 (6.1–8.5)
Tennessee 5,866 14.1 0.7 (12.7–15.6)
Texas 14,363 10.0 0.5 (9.0–11.0)
Utah 11,246 10.5 0.4 (9.8–11.2)
Vermont 6,392 11.0 0.6 (9.8–12.3)
Virginia 8,496 10.4 0.5 (9.5–11.4)
Washington 15,886 11.3 0.4 (10.5–12.0)
West Virginia 5,862 15.8 0.6 (14.6–17.0)
Wisconsin 6,135 10.3 0.6 (9.1–11.5)
Wyoming 5,398 11.8 0.8 (10.2–13.4)
Guam 1,663 10.6 1.2 (8.3–13.0)
Puerto Rico 5,362 13.0 0.6 (11.9–14.1)
Median 11.3
Range 7.3–15.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Stress, depression, and problems with emotions.

TABLE 6. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported ≥14 days of poor mental health during the past 30 days, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 569 6.8 1.4 (4.0–9.5)
Akron, Ohio 496 10.6 2.1 (6.5–14.7)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 911 11.1 1.5 (8.2–14.0)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,443 9.3 1.0 (7.3–11.2)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 803 13.3 2.3 (8.8–17.8)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,040 11.8 1.4 (9.0–14.6)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,009 8.1 0.8 (6.5–9.6)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 771 15.3 3.0 (9.5–21.1)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,844 9.7 1.1 (7.5–11.9)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,544 10.8 1.0 (8.9–12.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 636 11.9 1.6 (8.8–14.9)
Billings, Montana 667 9.7 1.6 (6.5–12.8)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,312 11.6 1.2 (9.2–14.0)
Bismarck, North Dakota 864 10.9 1.7 (7.5–14.3)
Boise City, Idaho 1,442 10.9 1.2 (8.6–13.3)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,430 10.7 0.8 (9.1–12.3)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 739 13.7 2.0 (9.7–17.7)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,775 10.0 1.0 (8.0–12.1)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,856 11.4 1.0 (9.5–13.3)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,549 12.5 1.4 (9.7–15.3)
Charleston, West Virginia 878 14.8 1.5 (11.8–17.8)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,553 10.6 1.1 (8.4–12.7)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,987 9.9 0.9 (8.1–11.8)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,641 10.3 0.7 (8.9–11.7)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,671 11.1 1.3 (8.5–13.6)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,588 10.2 1.1 (8.0–12.4)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,038 12.8 1.8 (9.3–16.3)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 541 NA NA NA
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,426 14.0 1.5 (11.0–16.9)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,232 15.2 1.6 (12.2–18.3)
Columbus, Ohio 1,782 12.6 1.3 (10.1–15.1)
Corpus Christi, Texas 550 15.0 2.9 (9.3–20.6)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,281 5.8 1.3 (3.4–8.3)
Dayton, Ohio 565 14.4 2.5 (9.5–19.3)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,834 10.1 0.6 (8.8–11.3)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,064 11.8 1.7 (8.6–15.1)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 951 13.0 1.7 (9.6–16.4)
El Paso, Texas 754 9.7 1.3 (7.1–12.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 980 9.5 1.2 (7.1–11.8)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 805 10.8 2.1 (6.7–14.9)
Florence, South Carolina 518 14.3 2.0 (10.3–18.3)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 598 13.8 2.5 (8.9–18.7)
Grand Island, Nebraska 775 10.6 1.6 (7.4–13.8)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 915 9.4 1.3 (6.9–11.9)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,466 13.1 1.3 (10.6–15.6)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 646 18.4 2.3 (13.9–22.9)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 777 20.5 4.2 (12.3–28.7)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,946 11.0 0.8 (9.5–12.5)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 616 12.9 2.3 (8.3–17.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,069 10.3 1.3 (7.8–12.8)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,218 16.7 1.5 (13.7–19.7)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 563 9.2 1.8 (5.6–12.7)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,977 13.1 1.2 (10.7–15.4)
Jackson, Mississippi 707 13.4 1.8 (10.0–16.9)
Jacksonville, Florida 660 15.5 2.2 (11.2–19.7)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,299 8.5 1.0 (6.5–10.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,620 11.4 0.8 (9.9–12.9)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 515 9.9 1.8 (6.4–13.4)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 512 16.3 3.4 (9.7–22.9)
Knoxville, Tennessee 564 15.2 2.4 (10.5–19.9)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,783 9.4 0.9 (7.6–11.2)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,113 15.2 1.9 (11.4–18.9)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 580 10.4 1.7 (7.0–13.7)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,976 11.1 0.7 (9.7–12.6)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,784 13.7 1.6 (10.6–16.9)
Manhattan, Kansas 692 7.9 1.3 (5.4–10.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,055 14.4 2.0 (10.4–18.4)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 2,037 15.7 1.4 (13.0–18.4)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,628 12.1 1.4 (9.4–14.8)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,584 8.4 0.4 (7.6–9.2)
Minot, North Dakota 510 13.3 2.6 (8.2–18.5)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 508 6.9 1.3 (4.4–9.3)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 996 15.2 1.8 (11.7–18.7)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,064 9.9 1.3 (7.4–12.3)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,448 11.8 1.3 (9.3–14.3)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,598 9.9 1.0 (7.9–11.8)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 957 14.5 1.5 (11.6–17.4)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,131 10.8 0.5 (9.8–11.7)
Norfolk, Nebraska 736 8.5 1.4 (5.8–11.1)
North Platte, Nebraska 649 7.9 1.4 (5.2–10.7)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 942 10.1 1.3 (7.5–12.7)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,054 10.5 0.8 (8.9–12.1)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,009 11.7 1.1 (9.4–13.9)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,986 9.7 0.7 (8.3–11.1)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 989 9.9 1.5 (7.1–12.8)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 786 18.5 2.1 (14.4–22.5)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,902 10.6 0.7 (9.3–11.9)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,255 10.3 1.1 (8.1–12.6)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,653 12.1 1.1 (9.9–14.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,169 11.8 0.8 (10.2–13.5)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,938 13.9 1.2 (11.6–16.2)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,757 8.4 0.7 (7.0–9.9)
Raleigh, North Carolina 681 8.7 1.3 (6.2–11.3)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,301 8.4 1.2 (6.0–10.8)
Reno, Nevada 920 12.1 1.7 (8.8–15.3)
Richmond, Virginia 1,352 11.4 1.2 (9.1–13.8)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,479 11.5 1.0 (9.6–13.5)
Rochester, Minnesota 682 5.6 1.0 (3.5–7.6)
Rochester, New York 764 11.6 1.7 (8.2–14.9)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,977 13.4 1.4 (10.8–16.1)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,021 11.7 1.3 (9.2–14.1)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 626 9.4 1.7 (6.1–12.6)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,206 11.9 1.1 (9.8–14.0)
Salina, Kansas 499 6.6 1.3 (4.0–9.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,034 14.2 2.6 (9.2–19.3)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,040 11.4 0.6 (10.1–12.6)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 767 8.2 1.3 (5.6–10.8)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 573 8.6 1.3 (6.0–11.1)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 655 8.8 1.3 (6.3–11.3)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,386 12.8 0.7 (11.4–14.3)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 669 13.9 2.1 (9.9–18.0)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,713 9.6 0.6 (8.5–10.7)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,285 9.9 1.4 (7.2–12.7)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 919 11.7 3.0 (5.8–17.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,334 7.0 1.3 (4.5–9.5)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 486 13.8 2.4 (9.0–18.6)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,515 11.5 1.3 (9.0–14.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,167 14.6 1.6 (11.4–17.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,505 12.0 1.3 (9.5–14.4)
Toledo, Ohio 716 11.3 2.0 (7.3–15.3)
Topeka, Kansas 2,104 12.6 1.0 (10.5–14.6)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,567 12.8 1.3 (10.2–15.4)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 558 17.6 2.3 (13.1–22.0)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,744 11.6 1.1 (9.4–13.7)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,092 9.8 0.8 (8.2–11.5)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,828 7.8 0.6 (6.6–8.9)
Wichita, Kansas 4,667 9.4 0.6 (8.3–10.5)
Wichita Falls, Texas 574 10.1 2.4 (5.4–14.7)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,231 12.3 1.2 (9.9–14.6)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,542 10.7 1.1 (8.6–12.9)
Median 11.4
Range 5.6–20.5

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; NA = not available; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Stress, depression, and problems with emotions.
§ Metropolitan division.
Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the relative standard error was >0.3.

TABLE 7. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged 18–64 years who have health care coverage, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 5,225 83.0 0.8 (81.4–84.7)
Alaska 2,706 82.6 1.4 (79.9–85.3)
Arizona 4,342 82.1 0.9 (80.3–83.9)
Arkansas 2,761 84.2 1.3 (81.7–86.7)
California 9,638 86.1 0.5 (85.2–87.0)
Colorado 8,947 86.9 0.6 (85.8–88.0)
Connecticut 7,400 90.8 0.5 (89.8–91.9)
Delaware 2,464 89.2 0.8 (87.6–90.9)
District of Columbia 2,178 93.5 1.0 (91.4–95.5)
Florida 5,231 78.4 0.9 (76.7–80.1)
Georgia 2,925 78.8 1.1 (76.6–81.0)
Hawaii 4,786 91.0 0.7 (89.7–92.3)
Idaho 3,617 82.2 0.9 (80.3–84.0)
Illinois 3,463 88.6 0.8 (87.1–90.1)
Indiana 3,634 85.5 0.9 (83.7–87.3)
Iowa 3,857 92.0 0.6 (90.8–93.3)
Kansas 15,218 83.9 0.4 (83.1–84.6)
Kentucky 5,793 91.6 0.7 (90.3–93.0)
Louisiana 3,064 81.1 1.0 (79.2–83.1)
Maine 5,592 86.9 0.8 (85.4–88.5)
Maryland 7,263 89.2 0.9 (87.3–91.0)
Massachusetts 6,414 93.8 0.4 (93.0–94.7)
Michigan 5,965 87.6 0.6 (86.4–88.8)
Minnesota 11,491 92.5 0.4 (91.8–93.2)
Mississippi 3,587 78.0 1.0 (75.9–80.0)
Missouri 4,406 84.4 0.8 (82.7–86.0)
Montana 3,650 84.5 0.9 (82.7–86.3)
Nebraska 11,342 85.2 0.6 (84.1–86.4)
Nevada 1,812 82.0 1.5 (79.1–84.8)
New Hampshire 4,162 91.1 0.7 (89.6–92.5)
New Jersey 7,774 85.3 0.8 (83.8–86.8)
New Mexico 4,251 86.1 0.9 (84.4–87.9)
New York 8,088 87.4 0.6 (86.3–88.5)
North Carolina 4,691 80.3 0.7 (78.9–81.8)
North Dakota 3,122 90.2 0.8 (88.7–91.7)
Ohio 6,936 89.4 0.7 (88.1–90.8)
Oklahoma 4,003 82.9 0.9 (81.1–84.7)
Oregon 3,264 89.7 0.7 (88.2–91.1)
Pennsylvania 3,897 89.5 0.8 (88.0–91.0)
Rhode Island 3,802 90.2 0.8 (88.6–91.9)
South Carolina 7,115 82.2 0.7 (80.9–83.5)
South Dakota 4,468 89.1 0.9 (87.4–90.8)
Tennessee 3,639 82.9 1.0 (80.8–84.9)
Texas 9,036 72.0 0.9 (70.3–73.7)
Utah 8,564 86.8 0.5 (85.9–87.8)
Vermont 4,419 92.7 0.6 (91.6–93.8)
Virginia 5,963 86.6 0.7 (85.3–87.9)
Washington 9,937 87.7 0.5 (86.7–88.7)
West Virginia 4,072 89.9 0.6 (88.7–91.1)
Wisconsin 4,129 90.3 0.8 (88.8–91.9)
Wyoming 3,025 82.7 1.1 (80.4–84.9)
Guam 1,443 76.8 1.7 (73.4–80.1)
Puerto Rico 3,632 91.3 0.6 (90.1–92.5)
Median 86.8
Range 72.0–93.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).

TABLE 8. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged 18–64 years who have health care coverage, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 329 89.2 2.3 (84.7–93.6)
Akron, Ohio 298 93.3 2.2 (88.9–97.6)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 584 94.9 1.4 (92.3–97.6)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 949 86.5 1.7 (83.1–89.9)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 522 91.5 2.7 (86.3–96.7)
Anchorage, Alaska 785 79.8 2.3 (75.3–84.3)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,354 82.5 1.5 (79.5–85.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 480 84.2 3.5 (77.3–91.1)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,204 77.6 1.9 (73.9–81.3)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 2,714 90.9 1.4 (88.3–93.6)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 440 87.2 2.0 (83.4–91.1)
Billings, Montana 436 85.9 2.3 (81.4–90.5)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 897 83.4 2.0 (79.4–87.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 544 88.8 2.3 (84.4–93.3)
Boise City, Idaho 944 83.1 1.7 (79.7–86.5)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 1,717 94.2 0.8 (92.7–95.7)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 478 93.1 1.8 (89.6–96.5)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,320 95.5 0.7 (94.1–96.9)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,048 93.8 0.8 (92.3–95.4)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,091 88.3 1.8 (84.7–91.8)
Charleston, West Virginia 608 89.2 1.7 (85.9–92.5)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,042 83.0 1.6 (79.8–86.2)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,391 82.7 1.4 (80.0–85.5)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 2,493 86.7 0.9 (84.8–88.5)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,066 90.5 1.7 (87.1–93.9)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,004 90.1 1.8 (86.6–93.6)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 623 90.2 1.9 (86.5–94.0)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 276 73.9 5.1 (64.0–83.8)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 960 88.1 1.7 (84.8–91.4)
Columbia, South Carolina 836 85.5 1.8 (82.0–88.9)
Columbus, Ohio 1,152 91.3 1.4 (88.6–93.9)
Corpus Christi, Texas 285 69.1 5.1 (59.1–79.0)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 791 74.2 2.5 (69.2–79.1)
Dayton, Ohio 319 88.2 2.7 (83.0–93.4)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 4,074 88.3 0.8 (86.7–89.8)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 679 93.6 1.4 (90.8–96.3)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 629 95.3 1.0 (93.3–97.4)
El Paso, Texas 514 63.2 2.8 (57.8–68.6)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 689 89.1 1.6 (85.9–92.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 425 82.3 3.3 (75.8–88.9)
Florence, South Carolina 347 86.3 2.4 (81.6–90.9)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 371 75.7 3.2 (69.5–81.9)
Grand Island, Nebraska 494 78.3 3.0 (72.5–84.1)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 645 87.0 2.2 (82.7–91.3)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 921 83.2 1.7 (79.8–86.5)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 399 75.4 3.1 (69.4–81.5)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 446 87.5 3.5 (80.7–94.3)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,492 93.1 0.9 (91.3–94.8)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 301 72.5 3.4 (65.8–79.2)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,276 70.3 2.3 (65.8–74.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 839 90.9 1.4 (88.2–93.6)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 386 85.4 2.6 (80.4–90.4)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,235 87.8 1.3 (85.2–90.3)
Jackson, Mississippi 478 83.3 2.4 (78.6–87.9)
Jacksonville, Florida 414 83.9 2.5 (79.0–88.9)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 838 90.2 1.5 (87.4–93.1)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 5,064 85.7 1.0 (83.8–87.6)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 314 81.0 3.2 (74.8–87.2)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 296 86.5 3.6 (79.4–93.6)
Knoxville, Tennessee 345 84.1 2.9 (78.5–89.7)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,279 86.8 1.3 (84.3–89.3)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 643 83.9 2.4 (79.2–88.7)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 427 86.4 2.4 (81.7–91.2)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,374 83.7 0.9 (81.9–85.6)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,060 91.5 1.5 (88.5–94.4)
Manhattan, Kansas 501 87.4 1.8 (83.9–91.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 638 79.3 2.9 (73.7–85.0)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,182 79.0 1.7 (75.7–82.3)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,036 90.3 1.7 (87.0–93.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 6,135 93.2 0.5 (92.2–94.1)
Minot, North Dakota 333 91.6 1.9 (87.8–95.4)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 368 95.7 1.7 (92.4–98.9)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 597 77.6 2.5 (72.7–82.5)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 708 85.7 2.1 (81.6–89.8)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 968 86.7 1.6 (83.6–89.8)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 2,555 85.6 1.3 (83.1–88.2)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 682 80.8 2.1 (76.6–85.0)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 5,774 85.0 0.7 (83.7–86.4)
Norfolk, Nebraska 526 86.3 2.1 (82.2–90.4)
North Platte, Nebraska 413 82.9 2.5 (78.0–87.7)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 714 90.8 1.4 (88.0–93.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,628 89.4 1.0 (87.4–91.4)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,213 84.2 1.6 (81.1–87.3)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 2,724 86.0 1.0 (84.0–88.0)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 608 79.7 2.5 (74.9–84.6)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 556 83.8 2.1 (79.6–88.0)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 2,820 82.0 1.1 (79.8–84.2)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 858 90.7 1.4 (88.0–93.3)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 1,575 89.4 1.3 (86.8–91.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,051 90.7 0.9 (88.9–92.6)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 4,418 91.7 0.7 (90.4–93.1)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,471 88.3 1.1 (86.2–90.4)
Raleigh, North Carolina 537 83.6 1.9 (79.9–87.2)
Rapid City, South Dakota 762 82.9 2.4 (78.2–87.6)
Reno, Nevada 571 88.2 2.0 (84.4–92.1)
Richmond, Virginia 982 87.4 1.6 (84.3–90.5)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,135 85.2 1.3 (82.6–87.7)
Rochester, Minnesota 467 91.3 1.8 (87.7–94.9)
Rochester, New York 446 89.4 2.7 (84.1–94.7)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,235 91.2 1.3 (88.7–93.8)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 802 90.8 1.2 (88.4–93.2)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 475 93.7 1.4 (90.9–96.5)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,416 87.9 1.3 (85.3–90.4)
Salina, Kansas 343 82.5 2.6 (77.4–87.7)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,053 82.2 2.8 (76.8–87.7)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,134 86.3 0.8 (84.7–87.8)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 524 78.1 2.5 (73.2–83.1)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 465 93.5 1.3 (91.0–96.0)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 538 90.8 1.4 (88.1–93.5)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 2,286 91.3 0.7 (89.8–92.7)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 421 81.6 2.4 (76.9–86.3)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 3,781 89.6 0.7 (88.2–91.0)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 1,432 90.5 1.9 (86.7–94.3)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 531 84.6 3.3 (78.1–91.0)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 858 91.4 1.6 (88.2–94.6)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 306 79.4 3.4 (72.7–86.1)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 927 90.5 1.5 (87.6–93.4)
Springfield, Massachusetts 800 89.2 1.8 (85.7–92.6)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 869 78.3 2.1 (74.2–82.4)
Toledo, Ohio 446 88.2 2.5 (83.2–93.1)
Topeka, Kansas 1,391 86.7 1.3 (84.2–89.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 939 82.0 1.9 (78.3–85.7)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 403 84.8 2.6 (79.6–89.9)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,236 88.2 1.3 (85.6–90.7)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,387 90.1 1.1 (88.0–92.2)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 4,930 88.4 1.0 (86.5–90.3)
Wichita, Kansas 3,096 83.0 0.9 (81.2–84.8)
Wichita Falls, Texas 283 79.2 3.9 (71.6–86.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,484 90.7 1.3 (88.2–93.2)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,089 94.6 0.9 (92.9–96.3)
Median 86.8
Range 63.2–95.7

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 9. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,831 70.8 0.8 (69.2–72.3)
Alaska 3,606 58.1 1.4 (55.3–60.8)
Arizona 7,812 66.4 0.9 (64.7–68.1)
Arkansas 5,144 68.7 1.3 (66.1–71.2)
California 12,498 66.7 0.5 (65.6–67.7)
Colorado 13,258 63.7 0.7 (62.4–65.1)
Connecticut 11,803 71.6 0.7 (70.2–72.9)
Delaware 4,000 74.9 1.1 (72.7–77.1)
District of Columbia 3,958 77.0 1.4 (74.4–79.7)
Florida 9,648 71.3 0.8 (69.7–72.8)
Georgia 4,621 71.5 1.0 (69.6–73.5)
Hawaii 7,143 67.5 0.8 (65.9–69.2)
Idaho 5,744 59.3 1.0 (57.3–61.3)
Illinois 5,274 68.6 0.9 (66.9–70.4)
Indiana 6,008 64.7 1.0 (62.7–66.7)
Iowa 6,133 69.8 0.9 (68.0–71.5)
Kansas 22,651 68.3 0.4 (67.4–69.1)
Kentucky 8,629 74.6 0.9 (72.9–76.3)
Louisiana 4,612 72.3 1.0 (70.4–74.2)
Maine 9,017 69.0 0.9 (67.3–70.7)
Maryland 12,451 75.8 0.9 (73.9–77.6)
Massachusetts 9,150 77.4 0.6 (76.1–78.6)
Michigan 8,844 71.0 0.7 (69.7–72.3)
Minnesota 16,559 70.0 0.5 (69.0–71.0)
Mississippi 5,949 74.1 0.9 (72.3–76.0)
Missouri 7,186 66.2 0.9 (64.5–68.0)
Montana 5,946 61.5 1.0 (59.5–63.6)
Nebraska 17,331 63.6 0.6 (62.3–64.8)
Nevada 2,890 66.8 1.5 (63.9–69.7)
New Hampshire 6,955 71.3 0.9 (69.5–73.2)
New Jersey 11,329 77.3 0.7 (75.9–78.7)
New Mexico 6,653 63.8 1.0 (61.8–65.8)
New York 12,246 71.9 0.6 (70.7–73.1)
North Carolina 6,614 72.9 0.7 (71.5–74.3)
North Dakota 4,931 61.9 1.0 (60.0–63.8)
Ohio 11,750 70.8 0.8 (69.2–72.4)
Oklahoma 6,838 65.6 0.9 (63.8–67.5)
Oregon 5,168 61.7 0.9 (59.9–63.6)
Pennsylvania 5,686 72.0 0.9 (70.3–73.8)
Rhode Island 6,150 79.8 0.9 (78.0–81.6)
South Carolina 11,454 66.7 0.7 (65.4–68.1)
South Dakota 7,130 69.3 1.1 (67.2–71.4)
Tennessee 5,853 71.9 1.0 (69.9–73.9)
Texas 14,452 66.6 0.8 (65.1–68.2)
Utah 11,161 61.0 0.6 (59.9–62.2)
Vermont 6,387 67.8 0.9 (66.1–69.5)
Virginia 8,573 74.7 0.7 (73.3–76.0)
Washington 15,856 63.7 0.6 (62.6–64.8)
West Virginia 5,894 78.5 0.7 (77.1–79.9)
Wisconsin 6,151 67.3 1.0 (65.4–69.2)
Wyoming 5,384 60.7 1.1 (58.4–62.9)
Guam 1,665 65.3 1.7 (62.0–68.7)
Puerto Rico 5,365 77.1 0.8 (75.5–78.7)
Median 69.0
Range 58.1–79.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.

TABLE 10. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 574 68.7 2.9 (63.1–74.3)
Akron, Ohio 499 74.2 3.6 (67.0–81.3)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 931 75.9 2.1 (71.7–80.0)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,452 63.3 1.8 (59.7–66.9)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 810 72.6 3.4 (66.0–79.3)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,054 58.0 2.2 (53.6–62.4)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,014 73.1 1.4 (70.3–75.8)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 781 73.6 3.5 (66.8–80.4)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,861 65.6 1.7 (62.2–69.0)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,569 76.5 1.4 (73.8–79.3)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 628 75.1 2.3 (70.7–79.6)
Billings, Montana 672 66.7 2.6 (61.6–71.7)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,334 71.4 1.8 (67.8–75.0)
Bismarck, North Dakota 871 61.8 2.3 (57.2–66.4)
Boise City, Idaho 1,458 60.0 1.9 (56.3–63.6)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,437 78.5 1.1 (76.3–80.7)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 745 75.4 2.4 (70.7–80.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,771 67.2 1.6 (64.2–70.3)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,874 77.4 1.1 (75.2–79.7)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,560 78.0 1.6 (74.9–81.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 875 79.7 1.9 (76.1–83.4)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,565 68.6 1.6 (65.4–71.8)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,995 73.0 1.4 (70.2–75.7)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,673 69.1 1.0 (67.1–71.2)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,663 75.5 1.8 (72.0–79.0)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,590 68.1 2.1 (63.9–72.3)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,048 69.6 2.4 (64.8–74.3)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 550 67.6 4.4 (59.0–76.1)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,426 65.4 1.9 (61.6–69.2)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,235 67.2 1.9 (63.5–70.9)
Columbus, Ohio 1,790 69.4 1.7 (66.0–72.8)
Corpus Christi, Texas 557 70.1 3.9 (62.5–77.7)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,288 68.1 2.2 (63.7–72.5)
Dayton, Ohio 565 76.6 2.8 (71.1–82.1)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,821 65.8 1.0 (63.7–67.8)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,061 69.8 2.1 (65.7–74.0)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 953 71.8 2.2 (67.5–76.2)
El Paso, Texas 753 63.6 2.4 (59.0–68.3)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 988 66.4 1.9 (62.8–70.1)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 800 67.3 3.2 (61.1–73.5)
Florence, South Carolina 525 68.4 2.9 (62.8–74.0)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 606 63.1 3.1 (57.0–69.2)
Grand Island, Nebraska 768 60.8 2.7 (55.5–66.2)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 913 69.2 2.2 (64.8–73.6)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,484 65.4 1.8 (61.9–69.0)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 648 68.5 2.8 (63.1–73.9)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 780 72.8 4.4 (64.2–81.3)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,963 74.3 1.1 (72.1–76.5)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 618 62.5 3.1 (56.5–68.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,093 67.1 2.0 (63.3–71.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,224 80.3 1.6 (77.2–83.5)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 563 60.5 2.7 (55.1–65.8)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,998 66.0 1.6 (62.9–69.1)
Jackson, Mississippi 708 80.1 2.1 (75.9–84.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 672 72.6 2.6 (67.4–77.7)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,304 66.7 1.9 (62.9–70.5)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,563 67.7 1.1 (65.6–69.8)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 512 64.7 3.2 (58.5–70.9)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 513 71.8 3.9 (64.1–79.4)
Knoxville, Tennessee 563 70.2 3.1 (64.2–76.2)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,774 64.1 1.5 (61.1–67.0)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,118 70.5 2.6 (65.5–75.5)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 574 60.5 2.5 (55.5–65.4)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,976 67.5 1.1 (65.4–69.6)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,803 73.2 1.9 (69.4–77.0)
Manhattan, Kansas 689 67.1 2.2 (62.8–71.4)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,060 75.3 2.4 (70.5–80.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 2,080 72.4 1.5 (69.5–75.3)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,636 66.2 2.1 (62.1–70.3)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,599 70.9 0.7 (69.6–72.2)
Minot, North Dakota 518 60.4 3.2 (54.0–66.7)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 518 76.4 2.5 (71.5–81.3)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 1,013 68.8 2.4 (64.1–73.6)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,059 71.6 2.3 (67.2–76.1)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,470 72.7 1.7 (69.4–76.0)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,641 79.9 1.1 (77.7–82.1)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 961 72.1 2.0 (68.2–75.9)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,253 73.3 0.7 (71.9–74.7)
Norfolk, Nebraska 731 60.8 2.4 (56.2–65.5)
North Platte, Nebraska 643 59.8 2.7 (54.5–65.1)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 936 67.9 1.9 (64.1–71.7)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,042 61.6 1.2 (59.2–64.1)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,997 66.6 1.7 (63.2–70.0)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,985 66.6 1.1 (64.5–68.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 997 71.4 2.2 (67.1–75.7)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 794 76.7 2.0 (72.8–80.7)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,908 67.3 1.1 (65.2–69.4)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,254 70.8 1.8 (67.3–74.3)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,675 69.9 1.5 (66.9–72.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,150 62.9 1.2 (60.5–65.3)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 7,041 81.1 0.9 (79.3–82.9)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,739 59.6 1.3 (57.0–62.2)
Raleigh, North Carolina 675 75.0 1.9 (71.2–78.8)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,312 66.0 2.3 (61.4–70.5)
Reno, Nevada 930 65.6 2.3 (61.0–70.1)
Richmond, Virginia 1,361 75.3 1.6 (72.1–78.4)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,482 67.1 1.5 (64.1–70.1)
Rochester, Minnesota 686 60.7 2.4 (56.0–65.4)
Rochester, New York 778 64.7 2.7 (59.4–70.1)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,995 76.3 1.6 (73.2–79.4)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,029 65.8 1.8 (62.3–69.3)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 628 72.7 2.3 (68.2–77.2)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,224 69.2 1.5 (66.2–72.2)
Salina, Kansas 492 64.4 2.9 (58.6–70.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,037 72.1 2.7 (66.8–77.3)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,017 62.4 0.9 (60.5–64.2)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 769 69.7 2.3 (65.1–74.2)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 572 68.4 2.5 (63.5–73.3)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 653 66.8 2.2 (62.5–71.1)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,399 76.7 1.0 (74.7–78.6)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 665 58.4 2.6 (53.3–63.4)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,709 63.7 0.9 (62.0–65.5)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,297 72.8 2.1 (68.7–76.8)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 916 70.0 3.4 (63.3–76.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,335 73.5 2.1 (69.4–77.5)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 494 57.1 3.4 (50.4–63.8)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,521 63.3 1.9 (59.5–67.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,174 75.5 1.9 (71.8–79.3)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,530 70.0 1.9 (66.4–73.7)
Toledo, Ohio 721 71.9 2.8 (66.5–77.4)
Topeka, Kansas 2,097 71.2 1.4 (68.5–73.9)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,575 69.3 1.8 (65.7–72.9)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 568 73.7 2.6 (68.7–78.7)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,761 75.3 1.5 (72.4–78.3)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,101 70.8 1.4 (68.0–73.5)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,890 75.6 1.0 (73.7–77.5)
Wichita, Kansas 4,638 69.0 0.9 (67.2–70.9)
Wichita Falls, Texas 576 70.2 4.1 (62.2–78.3)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,236 75.6 1.5 (72.8–78.5)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,553 76.0 1.6 (73.0–79.1)
Median 69.4
Range 57.1–81.1

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 11. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who ever had their blood cholesterol checked, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,713 80.5 0.8 (79.0–82.0)
Alaska 3,589 75.2 1.2 (72.8–77.6)
Arizona 7,783 78.6 0.8 (76.9–80.2)
Arkansas 5,137 77.7 1.3 (75.3–80.2)
California 12,289 79.4 0.5 (78.5–80.3)
Colorado 13,196 80.5 0.6 (79.3–81.7)
Connecticut 11,645 83.6 0.7 (82.3–84.9)
Delaware 3,981 81.8 1.1 (79.6–84.0)
District of Columbia 3,899 86.7 1.3 (84.3–89.2)
Florida 9,595 80.4 0.7 (79.0–81.8)
Georgia 4,569 80.3 0.9 (78.4–82.1)
Hawaii 7,073 74.5 0.8 (73.0–76.1)
Idaho 5,694 75.3 0.9 (73.5–77.2)
Illinois 5,242 80.1 0.8 (78.5–81.7)
Indiana 5,975 75.3 1.0 (73.4–77.2)
Iowa 6,091 76.7 0.9 (75.0–78.4)
Kansas 22,637 75.6 0.4 (74.8–76.4)
Kentucky 8,633 76.7 0.9 (75.0–78.5)
Louisiana 4,561 78.9 0.9 (77.1–80.7)
Maine 8,936 81.5 0.8 (79.9–83.1)
Maryland 12,382 84.0 0.9 (82.2–85.8)
Massachusetts 9,067 84.2 0.6 (83.0–85.4)
Michigan 8,731 80.3 0.6 (79.1–81.6)
Minnesota 16,347 79.6 0.5 (78.7–80.6)
Mississippi 5,915 76.6 0.9 (74.7–78.4)
Missouri 7,123 77.6 0.8 (75.9–79.2)
Montana 5,883 75.8 1.0 (73.9–77.7)
Nebraska 17,216 77.5 0.6 (76.4–78.6)
Nevada 2,850 78.0 1.4 (75.3–80.7)
New Hampshire 6,889 83.7 0.9 (82.0–85.5)
New Jersey 11,239 83.5 0.7 (82.2–84.8)
New Mexico 6,621 73.3 0.9 (71.4–75.1)
New York 12,126 80.9 0.6 (79.8–82.0)
North Carolina 6,523 82.0 0.7 (80.7–83.3)
North Dakota 4,885 74.5 0.9 (72.6–76.3)
Ohio 11,693 79.1 0.8 (77.5–80.6)
Oklahoma 6,784 76.5 0.9 (74.7–78.3)
Oregon 5,188 79.4 0.9 (77.7–81.1)
Pennsylvania 5,603 78.4 0.9 (76.7–80.1)
Rhode Island 6,090 81.2 1.0 (79.3–83.1)
South Carolina 11,348 80.5 0.6 (79.2–81.7)
South Dakota 7,059 75.2 1.0 (73.2–77.3)
Tennessee 5,825 81.4 1.0 (79.5–83.4)
Texas 14,432 75.6 0.7 (74.2–77.1)
Utah 11,126 74.0 0.5 (73.0–75.1)
Vermont 6,341 80.9 0.8 (79.3–82.5)
Virginia 8,477 81.9 0.7 (80.6–83.3)
Washington 15,693 77.2 0.6 (76.1–78.3)
West Virginia 5,820 82.9 0.7 (81.5–84.3)
Wisconsin 6,126 78.4 0.9 (76.7–80.1)
Wyoming 5,381 77.1 1.1 (74.9–79.2)
Guam 1,659 74.9 1.6 (71.9–78.0)
Puerto Rico 5,295 79.8 0.8 (78.3–81.3)
Median 79.1
Range 73.3–86.7

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.

TABLE 12. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who ever had their blood cholesterol checked, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Akron, Ohio 499 72.7 3.6 (65.6–79.8)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 919 79.8 2.2 (75.4–84.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,439 76.0 1.7 (72.7–79.4)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 810 79.7 3.4 (73.1–86.3)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,052 76.9 2.0 (73.1–80.8)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,995 82.7 1.3 (80.1–85.2)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 770 78.6 3.5 (71.7–85.5)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,849 77.1 1.6 (74.1–80.2)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,532 84.2 1.4 (81.5–86.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 618 83.5 2.0 (79.5–87.5)
Billings, Montana 656 81.5 2.2 (77.3–85.8)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,295 79.6 1.8 (76.0–83.1)
Bismarck, North Dakota 863 75.6 2.2 (71.3–80.0)
Boise City, Idaho 1,440 78.0 1.8 (74.5–81.4)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,414 84.9 1.0 (82.9–86.9)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 741 79.9 2.5 (75.0–84.8)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,751 81.7 1.5 (78.8–84.5)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,849 84.0 1.1 (81.8–86.2)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,545 83.8 1.6 (80.7–87.0)
Charleston, West Virginia 871 83.8 1.8 (80.3–87.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,537 78.6 1.6 (75.5–81.7)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,978 83.4 1.3 (80.8–86.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,647 82.0 1.0 (80.1–83.9)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,661 80.0 1.8 (76.4–83.6)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,575 81.8 2.1 (77.6–85.9)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,033 79.4 2.3 (74.8–83.9)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 549 81.8 4.1 (73.7–89.8)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,416 81.8 1.7 (78.5–85.0)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,215 82.2 1.7 (78.8–85.6)
Columbus, Ohio 1,778 81.0 1.6 (77.9–84.0)
Corpus Christi, Texas 563 77.4 3.8 (70.0–84.9)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,284 75.5 2.1 (71.4–79.5)
Dayton, Ohio 556 75.8 3.1 (69.7–81.9)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,801 83.0 0.9 (81.3–84.7)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,059 81.8 1.9 (78.0–85.6)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 953 73.2 2.2 (68.9–77.6)
El Paso, Texas 751 72.5 2.3 (68.0–77.1)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 984 75.2 1.7 (71.8–78.6)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 797 76.4 3.1 (70.4–82.5)
Florence, South Carolina 521 77.7 2.7 (72.5–83.0)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 601 74.9 3.0 (69.0–80.8)
Grand Island, Nebraska 764 74.7 2.6 (69.6–79.8)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 894 78.5 2.2 (74.2–82.7)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,476 80.6 1.6 (77.4–83.8)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 645 74.1 2.7 (68.9–79.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 775 77.0 4.1 (69.0–84.9)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,909 83.3 1.1 (81.0–85.5)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 621 78.3 2.9 (72.6–84.0)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,077 77.6 1.9 (73.9–81.2)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,210 79.1 1.8 (75.6–82.5)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 560 76.4 2.5 (71.6–81.3)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,979 77.5 1.5 (74.6–80.4)
Jackson, Mississippi 707 77.8 2.3 (73.2–82.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 658 76.1 2.7 (70.9–81.3)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,295 78.6 1.7 (75.2–82.0)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,555 78.7 1.0 (76.8–80.7)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 503 72.1 3.0 (66.2–78.0)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 502 75.8 3.8 (68.3–83.3)
Knoxville, Tennessee 566 85.4 2.6 (80.4–90.5)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,762 79.4 1.3 (76.8–82.0)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,114 80.8 2.3 (76.2–85.3)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 569 65.1 2.5 (60.1–70.0)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,917 81.4 0.9 (79.7–83.1)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,788 77.8 1.9 (74.1–81.6)
Manhattan, Kansas 673 71.7 2.1 (67.7–75.8)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,056 79.8 2.5 (74.9–84.7)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 2,077 81.1 1.4 (78.3–83.9)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,627 82.3 1.8 (78.7–85.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,481 81.7 0.6 (80.5–83.0)
Minot, North Dakota 513 76.4 3.0 (70.4–82.3)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 508 80.9 2.9 (75.3–86.5)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 999 77.5 2.4 (72.8–82.2)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,045 78.4 2.2 (74.1–82.8)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,459 82.6 1.6 (79.5–85.6)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,589 82.9 1.2 (80.5–85.3)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 946 82.0 1.9 (78.4–85.7)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,166 82.6 0.6 (81.4–83.9)
Norfolk, Nebraska 729 76.5 2.1 (72.4–80.6)
North Platte, Nebraska 647 74.8 2.5 (69.9–79.8)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 920 82.5 1.5 (79.5–85.4)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,037 76.2 1.1 (74.0–78.5)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,007 76.1 1.7 (72.8–79.4)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,951 79.3 1.0 (77.3–81.3)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 979 83.6 2.0 (79.7–87.5)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 784 77.6 2.1 (73.5–81.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,882 80.4 1.0 (78.5–82.4)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,241 80.4 1.7 (77.1–83.7)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,652 83.9 1.4 (81.2–86.6)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,132 81.3 1.1 (79.2–83.5)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,969 83.6 1.0 (81.7–85.5)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,719 71.5 1.1 (69.3–73.8)
Raleigh, North Carolina 658 87.3 1.5 (84.3–90.3)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,295 75.7 2.3 (71.3–80.2)
Reno, Nevada 919 79.8 2.1 (75.6–83.9)
Richmond, Virginia 1,348 81.2 1.5 (78.2–84.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,457 78.3 1.4 (75.6–81.0)
Rochester, Minnesota 667 77.2 2.3 (72.7–81.7)
Rochester, New York 770 80.5 2.6 (75.5–85.6)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,973 84.5 1.7 (81.2–87.9)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,009 76.4 1.6 (73.2–79.6)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 616 76.9 2.3 (72.3–81.5)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,187 78.8 1.4 (76.0–81.6)
Salina, Kansas 497 73.5 2.8 (68.1–79.0)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,032 80.8 2.6 (75.8–85.9)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,008 77.3 0.8 (75.7–78.9)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 766 79.4 2.1 (75.2–83.5)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 553 83.5 1.8 (80.1–87.0)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 641 82.0 1.8 (78.5–85.5)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,343 79.2 1.0 (77.2–81.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 659 74.3 2.4 (69.6–79.1)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,640 79.4 0.8 (77.8–81.0)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,285 86.1 1.8 (82.5–89.7)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 917 68.4 3.3 (61.9–74.9)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,320 76.6 2.1 (72.5–80.7)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 492 83.3 2.8 (77.7–88.8)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,514 80.2 1.7 (76.8–83.6)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,159 83.8 1.7 (80.5–87.0)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,527 80.3 1.7 (76.9–83.6)
Toledo, Ohio 716 82.0 2.7 (76.8–87.3)
Topeka, Kansas 2,089 76.4 1.4 (73.7–79.0)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,548 78.7 1.7 (75.3–82.1)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 544 79.7 2.5 (74.8–84.6)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,739 83.2 1.5 (80.4–86.1)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,079 85.2 1.2 (82.8–87.6)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,811 83.9 1.0 (81.9–85.8)
Wichita, Kansas 4,631 74.9 0.9 (73.1–76.7)
Wichita Falls, Texas 570 71.4 4.1 (63.5–79.4)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,212 80.7 1.6 (77.7–83.8)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,544 84.0 1.4 (81.2–86.8)
Median 79.5
Range 65.1–87.3

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 13. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of current smoking among adults aged ≥18 years, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,653 22.1 0.8 (20.6–23.6)
Alaska 3,551 18.8 1.1 (16.7–20.9)
Arizona 7,598 14.3 0.7 (13.0–15.6)
Arkansas 5,042 26.0 1.3 (23.5–28.5)
California 11,368 11.7 0.4 (11.0–12.5)
Colorado 12,355 15.7 0.6 (14.6–16.8)
Connecticut 11,293 13.8 0.6 (12.7–14.9)
Delaware 3,931 17.7 1.0 (15.8–19.6)
District of Columbia 3,782 16.0 1.2 (13.7–18.4)
Florida 9,253 16.4 0.6 (15.2–17.7)
Georgia 4,461 17.6 0.8 (15.9–19.2)
Hawaii 6,892 14.7 0.7 (13.4–16.1)
Idaho 5,617 14.0 0.7 (12.6–15.4)
Illinois 5,137 15.2 0.7 (13.8–16.6)
Indiana 5,846 20.8 0.9 (19.0–22.6)
Iowa 6,021 18.8 0.8 (17.2–20.3)
Kansas 22,055 18.1 0.4 (17.4–18.8)
Kentucky 8,536 26.6 0.9 (24.8–28.4)
Louisiana 4,483 22.0 0.9 (20.3–23.8)
Maine 8,826 21.1 0.8 (19.5–22.7)
Maryland 12,019 15.1 0.8 (13.6–16.7)
Massachusetts 8,741 14.2 0.6 (13.1–15.3)
Michigan 8,652 21.3 0.6 (20.0–22.5)
Minnesota 16,327 16.6 0.4 (15.8–17.4)
Mississippi 5,855 22.9 0.9 (21.1–24.6)
Missouri 7,131 22.9 0.8 (21.3–24.6)
Montana 5,898 20.0 0.9 (18.2–21.7)
Nebraska 17,079 17.5 0.5 (16.5–18.5)
Nevada 2,851 17.9 1.2 (15.5–20.4)
New Hampshire 6,766 16.4 0.8 (14.9–17.9)
New Jersey 10,959 13.9 0.6 (12.7–15.0)
New Mexico 6,447 17.9 0.8 (16.2–19.5)
New York 11,683 15.5 0.5 (14.5–16.4)
North Carolina 6,499 19.4 0.7 (18.1–20.7)
North Dakota 4,823 19.1 0.8 (17.5–20.8)
Ohio 11,522 22.3 0.8 (20.8–23.8)
Oklahoma 6,753 22.6 0.8 (20.9–24.2)
Oregon 5,119 17.6 0.8 (16.1–19.1)
Pennsylvania 5,531 18.8 0.8 (17.3–20.3)
Rhode Island 5,919 15.9 0.8 (14.3–17.6)
South Carolina 11,226 20.3 0.6 (19.1–21.5)
South Dakota 7,078 20.9 1.0 (19.0–22.8)
Tennessee 5,709 22.1 0.9 (20.3–23.9)
Texas 13,916 15.2 0.6 (14.0–16.3)
Utah 11,030 9.0 0.4 (8.3–9.7)
Vermont 6,289 16.7 0.7 (15.3–18.1)
Virginia 8,371 16.8 0.6 (15.6–17.9)
Washington 15,561 15.1 0.5 (14.2–16.0)
West Virginia 5,833 27.2 0.8 (25.7–28.8)
Wisconsin 5,962 17.7 0.8 (16.2–19.3)
Wyoming 5,281 19.5 1.0 (17.6–21.5)
Guam 1,605 25.9 1.7 (22.7–29.2)
Puerto Rico 5,331 11.1 0.6 (9.9–12.2)
Median 17.7
Range 9.0–27.2

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Having smoked at least 100 cigarettes in a lifetime and smoking every day or on certain days during the period of the survey.

TABLE 14. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of current smoking among adults aged ≥18 years, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 568 15.9 2.5 (11.0–20.8)
Akron, Ohio 494 29.5 3.9 (21.8–37.2)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 896 13.5 1.7 (10.2–16.8)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,406 18.3 1.5 (15.3–21.3)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 786 18.3 2.8 (12.9–23.8)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,043 15.8 1.6 (12.6–19.0)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,946 15.0 1.1 (12.9–17.2)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 769 18.8 2.7 (13.5–24.1)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,798 13.4 1.4 (10.7–16.1)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,419 16.2 1.3 (13.7–18.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 613 15.5 2.0 (11.6–19.3)
Billings, Montana 665 18.0 2.2 (13.8–22.3)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,285 20.3 1.7 (16.9–23.7)
Bismarck, North Dakota 851 19.1 2.1 (15.0–23.2)
Boise City, Idaho 1,414 12.5 1.3 (10.0–15.0)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,305 12.3 0.9 (10.4–14.1)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 719 18.1 2.2 (13.8–22.4)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,735 13.9 1.2 (11.6–16.2)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,756 12.0 1.0 (10.1–13.9)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,512 16.2 1.5 (13.3–19.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 869 25.6 2.0 (21.6–29.6)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,525 16.5 1.3 (13.9–19.0)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,963 15.7 1.2 (13.3–18.2)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,566 14.2 0.8 (12.5–15.8)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,638 22.1 1.8 (18.6–25.7)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,564 17.0 1.8 (13.5–20.5)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,013 23.4 2.3 (18.9–28.0)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 530 NA NA NA
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,321 19.5 1.7 (16.1–22.8)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,209 20.1 1.8 (16.6–23.6)
Columbus, Ohio 1,750 22.5 1.7 (19.2–25.9)
Corpus Christi, Texas 549 19.2 2.9 (13.5–24.9)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,247 14.8 1.9 (11.0–18.5)
Dayton, Ohio 555 17.4 2.5 (12.5–22.3)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,422 14.1 0.8 (12.6–15.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,038 17.3 1.9 (13.5–21.1)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 946 21.9 2.2 (17.6–26.3)
El Paso, Texas 738 13.4 1.8 (9.9–16.9)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 971 17.0 1.7 (13.8–20.3)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 783 20.8 2.8 (15.2–26.3)
Florence, South Carolina 516 26.9 2.8 (21.5–32.3)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 581 10.5 1.8 (6.9–14.1)
Grand Island, Nebraska 763 19.7 2.4 (15.0–24.4)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 901 17.8 1.8 (14.2–21.4)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,459 16.9 1.5 (14.0–19.8)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 647 24.9 2.7 (19.7–30.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 757 22.2 3.8 (14.8–29.6)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,798 13.4 0.9 (11.7–15.1)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 603 20.5 2.8 (15.1–25.9)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,972 13.5 1.4 (10.8–16.3)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,201 26.7 1.7 (23.3–30.1)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 551 11.9 2.0 (7.9–15.9)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,928 20.1 1.5 (17.3–23.0)
Jackson, Mississippi 691 19.0 2.1 (14.8–23.2)
Jacksonville, Florida 640 15.7 2.3 (11.2–20.3)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,263 17.2 1.8 (13.7–20.7)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,386 18.1 0.9 (16.3–19.9)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 496 13.3 2.3 (8.7–17.9)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 498 26.1 3.7 (18.9–33.3)
Knoxville, Tennessee 561 20.2 2.6 (15.0–25.3)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,754 15.5 1.1 (13.2–17.7)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,102 24.9 2.5 (20.0–29.7)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 574 4.5 1.0 (2.5–6.5)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,687 10.8 0.7 (9.4–12.2)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,774 24.7 2.0 (20.9–28.6)
Manhattan, Kansas 671 13.4 1.6 (10.2–16.6)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,036 19.2 2.2 (14.9–23.6)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,968 12.9 1.3 (10.4–15.3)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,579 18.4 1.8 (14.9–21.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,468 14.8 0.6 (13.7–15.9)
Minot, North Dakota 511 18.7 2.7 (13.4–24.0)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 502 10.4 1.9 (6.7–14.0)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 989 21.6 2.1 (17.4–25.7)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,029 17.8 1.7 (14.4–21.2)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,390 13.7 1.4 (10.9–16.4)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,507 12.2 1.0 (10.3–14.2)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 931 21.3 1.8 (17.8–24.9)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 7,860 13.0 0.5 (11.9–14.0)
Norfolk, Nebraska 717 16.1 1.8 (12.5–19.7)
North Platte, Nebraska 640 18.9 2.1 (14.8–23.0)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 864 10.8 1.5 (7.8–13.7)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,021 10.3 0.8 (8.7–11.9)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,987 19.1 1.5 (16.1–22.1)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,894 18.4 0.9 (16.5–20.2)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 955 15.2 1.9 (11.5–18.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 759 18.2 1.9 (14.4–22.0)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,762 13.5 0.8 (11.9–15.0)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,232 20.0 1.6 (16.9–23.2)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,605 19.0 1.5 (16.2–21.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,098 15.5 0.9 (13.7–17.4)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,775 16.3 0.9 (14.6–18.1)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,719 4.6 0.6 (3.4–5.7)
Raleigh, North Carolina 665 13.1 1.5 (10.1–16.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,301 22.3 2.2 (18.0–26.6)
Reno, Nevada 916 19.6 2.1 (15.5–23.7)
Richmond, Virginia 1,336 17.3 1.4 (14.6–20.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,341 14.3 1.2 (12.0–16.7)
Rochester, Minnesota 675 13.4 1.8 (10.0–16.9)
Rochester, New York 756 19.6 2.3 (15.1–24.2)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,931 15.1 1.4 (12.4–17.8)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 936 12.6 1.3 (10.0–15.1)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 608 15.2 1.8 (11.6–18.8)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,172 18.7 1.4 (16.0–21.3)
Salina, Kansas 485 19.1 2.5 (14.2–24.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,997 23.5 2.4 (18.7–28.2)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,942 10.2 0.6 (9.0–11.5)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 738 13.1 1.8 (9.6–16.5)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 516 9.7 2.0 (5.8–13.5)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 587 7.4 1.1 (5.1–9.6)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,367 10.7 0.8 (9.2–12.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 653 23.1 2.4 (18.4–27.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,591 12.4 0.7 (11.1–13.7)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland 2,222 12.8 1.7 (9.5–16.1)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 906 20.2 3.3 (13.7–26.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,320 20.0 2.0 (16.1–24.0)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 489 21.4 3.1 (15.4–27.4)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,505 16.5 1.5 (13.5–19.5)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,133 20.7 1.8 (17.1–24.3)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,467 18.2 1.6 (15.1–21.3)
Toledo, Ohio 699 17.2 2.3 (12.6–21.8)
Topeka, Kansas 2,012 21.6 1.3 (19.1–24.1)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,547 21.6 1.7 (18.4–24.9)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 550 23.4 2.6 (18.3–28.5)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,711 19.1 1.4 (16.4–21.9)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,049 18.4 1.3 (15.9–20.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,592 12.1 0.8 (10.5–13.7)
Wichita, Kansas 4,514 19.4 0.8 (17.7–21.0)
Wichita Falls, Texas 549 15.7 2.8 (10.3–21.1)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,177 16.4 1.3 (13.9–18.9)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,478 18.8 1.5 (16.0–21.7)
Median 17.3
Range 4.5–29.5

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; NA = not available; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Having smoked at least 100 cigarettes in a lifetime and smoking every day or on certain days during the period of the survey.
§ Metropolitan division.
Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the relative standard error was >0.3.

TABLE 15. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported binge drinking during the past 30 days, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,487 12.3 0.6 (11.2–13.5)
Alaska 3,465 20.2 1.2 (17.9–22.5)
Arizona 7,441 15.0 0.7 (13.6–16.5)
Arkansas 4,968 15.2 1.1 (13.1–17.4)
California 11,486 16.9 0.5 (16.0–17.8)
Colorado 12,160 18.2 0.6 (17.0–19.4)
Connecticut 11,000 18.4 0.6 (17.2–19.7)
Delaware 3,871 16.2 1.1 (14.1–18.3)
District of Columbia 3,702 26.0 1.5 (23.1–28.9)
Florida 9,026 17.3 0.7 (16.0–18.7)
Georgia 4,402 15.9 0.8 (14.2–17.5)
Hawaii 6,783 20.0 0.8 (18.5–21.5)
Idaho 5,532 14.8 0.8 (13.3–16.4)
Illinois 5,086 20.9 0.8 (19.3–22.5)
Indiana 5,742 16.7 0.8 (15.1–18.3)
Iowa 5,932 21.4 0.8 (19.7–23.0)
Kansas 21,568 16.6 0.4 (15.9–17.3)
Kentucky 8,342 16.4 0.8 (14.8–17.9)
Louisiana 4,351 18.1 0.9 (16.4–19.9)
Maine 8,695 20.4 0.8 (18.8–22.0)
Maryland 11,801 14.9 0.8 (13.3–16.5)
Massachusetts 8,474 19.1 0.7 (17.8–20.4)
Michigan 8,541 19.9 0.6 (18.7–21.0)
Minnesota 15,978 20.6 0.5 (19.7–21.5)
Mississippi 5,750 12.6 0.8 (11.0–14.1)
Missouri 7,011 17.8 0.8 (16.3–19.3)
Montana 5,783 21.7 0.9 (19.9–23.6)
Nebraska 16,832 20.5 0.5 (19.4–21.5)
Nevada 2,783 14.7 1.2 (12.4–17.0)
New Hampshire 6,628 18.0 0.9 (16.3–19.7)
New Jersey 10,697 17.1 0.7 (15.7–18.4)
New Mexico 6,365 13.7 0.8 (12.2–15.3)
New York 11,400 17.7 0.5 (16.6–18.7)
North Carolina 6,294 14.6 0.6 (13.5–15.8)
North Dakota 4,727 25.1 0.9 (23.3–27.0)
Ohio 11,342 19.8 0.8 (18.3–21.3)
Oklahoma 6,629 13.9 0.8 (12.4–15.4)
Oregon 5,007 17.8 0.8 (16.3–19.3)
Pennsylvania 5,392 18.5 0.8 (17.0–20.0)
Rhode Island 5,814 17.2 0.9 (15.5–19.0)
South Carolina 11,030 16.4 0.6 (15.3–17.6)
South Dakota 6,955 18.1 0.9 (16.4–19.9)
Tennessee 5,610 11.2 0.8 (9.6–12.7)
Texas 13,647 16.1 0.6 (14.8–17.3)
Utah 10,902 11.3 0.4 (10.5–12.1)
Vermont 6,182 19.6 0.8 (17.9–21.2)
Virginia 8,242 17.1 0.6 (15.9–18.4)
Washington 15,327 16.7 0.5 (15.8–17.6)
West Virginia 5,730 11.9 0.6 (10.7–13.1)
Wisconsin 5,890 24.5 0.9 (22.7–26.2)
Wyoming 5,211 17.0 1.0 (15.0–18.9)
Guam 1,577 19.8 1.4 (17.0–22.6)
Puerto Rico 5,255 13.7 0.6 (12.4–14.9)
Median 17.2
Range 11.2–26.0

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
For men, having at least five drinks on one or more occasions during the past 30 days. For women, having at least four drinks on one or more occasions during the past 30 days.

TABLE 16. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported binge drinking during the past 30 days, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 553 21.6 2.8 (16.2–27.0)
Akron, Ohio 484 22.8 3.5 (15.8–29.7)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 878 18.9 2.1 (14.7–23.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,388 14.9 1.5 (11.9–17.8)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 768 18.1 3.0 (12.2–24.0)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,011 19.7 1.9 (16.0–23.5)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,920 17.2 1.2 (14.8–19.6)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 755 12.8 2.5 (7.8–17.7)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,763 20.6 1.5 (17.6–23.5)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,311 15.1 1.3 (12.6–17.5)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 595 15.3 2.0 (11.4–19.3)
Billings, Montana 653 21.5 2.2 (17.1–25.8)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,261 11.0 1.3 (8.4–13.6)
Bismarck, North Dakota 838 21.3 2.1 (17.2–25.4)
Boise City, Idaho 1,388 15.4 1.5 (12.4–18.3)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,227 20.5 1.1 (18.3–22.8)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 705 16.6 2.2 (12.3–20.9)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,702 23.1 1.5 (20.2–26.1)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,669 17.6 1.1 (15.4–19.8)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,478 17.5 1.7 (14.3–20.8)
Charleston, West Virginia 849 10.9 1.5 (7.9–13.8)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,491 19.1 1.5 (16.2–21.9)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,917 14.7 1.2 (12.4–17.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,523 20.8 0.9 (19.0–22.7)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,592 22.0 1.8 (18.5–25.5)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,549 14.7 1.6 (11.6–17.8)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 992 22.6 2.4 (18.0–27.3)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 527 17.4 3.5 (10.5–24.3)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,291 15.6 1.6 (12.5–18.7)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,192 18.4 1.6 (15.2–21.5)
Columbus, Ohio 1,724 20.7 1.6 (17.5–23.8)
Corpus Christi, Texas 542 16.8 3.4 (10.1–23.6)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,228 15.7 1.8 (12.2–19.2)
Dayton, Ohio 552 16.8 2.8 (11.4–22.2)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,339 18.1 0.9 (16.3–19.9)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,018 22.8 2.0 (19.0–26.7)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 931 24.5 2.3 (20.0–29.0)
El Paso, Texas 722 17.9 2.1 (13.7–22.0)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 958 24.5 1.8 (21.1–28.0)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 778 12.7 2.2 (8.5–17.0)
Florence, South Carolina 506 19.9 2.7 (14.7–25.1)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 571 18.8 2.9 (13.2–24.4)
Grand Island, Nebraska 748 17.1 2.2 (12.8–21.4)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 889 19.1 1.9 (15.4–22.7)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,432 15.2 1.5 (12.3–18.2)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 634 10.6 1.8 (7.0–14.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 744 18.2 4.4 (9.6–26.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,704 18.2 1.1 (16.1–20.3)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 583 18.3 2.6 (13.2–23.4)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,931 13.9 1.5 (11.0–16.9)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,182 11.5 1.4 (8.8–14.2)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 549 10.0 1.8 (6.5–13.5)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,899 17.3 1.4 (14.6–20.0)
Jackson, Mississippi 678 13.4 1.9 (9.6–17.1)
Jacksonville, Florida 628 16.0 2.6 (10.9–21.2)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,238 20.7 1.8 (17.2–24.1)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,233 18.9 1.0 (17.0–20.8)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 484 19.0 2.7 (13.7–24.4)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 494 9.5 2.4 (4.7–14.3)
Knoxville, Tennessee 549 11.1 2.4 (6.4–15.7)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,723 21.4 1.3 (18.8–24.0)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,085 20.0 2.3 (15.4–24.6)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 570 6.7 1.7 (3.4–10.1)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,698 16.4 0.9 (14.6–18.1)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,729 19.4 1.9 (15.6–23.1)
Manhattan, Kansas 659 20.0 1.9 (16.4–23.7)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,016 14.2 2.2 (9.8–18.6)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,897 17.2 1.4 (14.4–20.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,566 22.8 1.9 (19.0–26.6)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,316 20.5 0.6 (19.3–21.7)
Minot, North Dakota 496 22.2 2.8 (16.7–27.8)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania 492 18.2 2.3 (13.6–22.7)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 978 17.2 1.8 (13.6–20.7)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee§ 1,014 12.8 1.7 (9.5–16.1)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,345 19.2 1.6 (16.1–22.4)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,424 17.1 1.2 (14.7–19.4)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 901 24.4 1.9 (20.6–28.2)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 7,649 17.0 0.6 (15.8–18.2)
Norfolk, Nebraska 701 21.2 2.0 (17.3–25.1)
North Platte, Nebraska 626 13.0 1.9 (9.4–16.7)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 868 16.4 1.7 (13.1–19.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,004 11.5 0.8 (9.9–13.2)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,948 15.6 1.4 (12.8–18.4)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,842 20.7 1.0 (18.8–22.7)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 938 16.0 1.9 (12.2–19.8)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 733 20.2 1.9 (16.5–24.0)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,648 14.4 0.8 (12.7–16.0)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,197 20.3 1.6 (17.1–23.5)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,567 22.8 1.5 (19.9–25.7)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,036 17.4 1.0 (15.5–19.3)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,641 16.8 1.2 (14.4–19.2)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,703 5.5 0.6 (4.2–6.7)
Raleigh, North Carolina 641 14.0 1.6 (10.9–17.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,285 15.3 1.9 (11.6–19.0)
Reno, Nevada 901 17.0 1.9 (13.4–20.7)
Richmond, Virginia 1,310 16.4 1.4 (13.8–19.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,363 15.4 1.1 (13.1–17.6)
Rochester, Minnesota 657 18.3 1.9 (14.6–22.0)
Rochester, New York 747 18.3 2.3 (13.8–22.8)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,887 18.0 1.6 (14.8–21.2)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 948 17.6 1.5 (14.6–20.5)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 591 19.9 2.0 (16.0–23.8)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,135 19.4 1.4 (16.6–22.1)
Salina, Kansas 475 19.6 2.6 (14.5–24.7)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,965 15.1 2.2 (10.8–19.4)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,885 14.6 0.7 (13.2–16.0)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 724 14.0 1.7 (10.6–17.4)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 535 18.6 1.9 (14.9–22.3)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 593 15.4 1.8 (11.9–18.8)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,316 14.4 0.8 (12.8–16.1)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 647 11.6 1.8 (8.2–15.1)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,519 18.7 0.8 (17.2–20.2)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,184 14.4 1.8 (10.9–17.8)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 893 13.9 2.2 (9.6–18.2)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,302 17.6 1.8 (14.0–21.2)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 482 13.5 2.6 (8.3–18.6)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,482 14.6 1.5 (11.7–17.4)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,098 19.0 1.8 (15.4–22.6)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,430 19.1 1.7 (15.8–22.4)
Toledo, Ohio 690 16.7 2.4 (12.0–21.4)
Topeka, Kansas 1,973 16.5 1.2 (14.1–18.8)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,520 12.9 1.4 (10.2–15.6)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 536 15.6 2.4 (10.9–20.2)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,674 18.1 1.4 (15.3–20.9)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,019 19.3 1.3 (16.9–21.8)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,460 18.2 0.9 (16.5–20.0)
Wichita, Kansas 4,409 14.9 0.7 (13.5–16.4)
Wichita Falls, Texas 533 9.7 2.4 (5.0–14.3)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,134 18.1 1.5 (15.3–21.0)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,446 19.6 1.5 (16.6–22.6)
Median 17.4
Range 5.5–24.5

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
For men, having at least five drinks on one or more occasions during the past 30 days. For women, having at least four drinks on one or more occasions during the past 30 days.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 17. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the preceding month, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,269 31.0 0.8 (29.4–32.6)
Alaska 3,420 21.9 1.2 (19.5–24.3)
Arizona 7,166 24.5 0.8 (22.9–26.1)
Arkansas 4,727 33.3 1.3 (30.8–35.7)
California 10,904 19.8 0.5 (18.9–20.8)
Colorado 11,792 17.6 0.6 (16.5–18.7)
Connecticut 10,581 22.9 0.7 (21.6–24.2)
Delaware 3,774 28.7 1.2 (26.3–31.0)
District of Columbia 3,541 19.8 1.2 (17.4–22.2)
Florida 8,686 25.2 0.8 (23.7–26.7)
Georgia 4,225 26.9 1.0 (25.0–28.9)
Hawaii 6,501 22.1 0.7 (20.7–23.6)
Idaho 5,360 20.9 0.8 (19.2–22.5)
Illinois 4,924 24.3 0.8 (22.7–25.8)
Indiana 5,553 28.7 1.0 (26.8–30.6)
Iowa 5,747 25.6 0.8 (24.0–27.2)
Kansas 20,851 26.0 0.4 (25.3–26.8)
Kentucky 8,070 31.2 0.9 (29.4–32.9)
Louisiana 4,236 31.1 1.0 (29.2–33.0)
Maine 8,528 23.4 0.7 (21.9–24.8)
Maryland 11,393 23.5 0.9 (21.8–25.2)
Massachusetts 8,105 25.8 0.7 (24.4–27.2)
Michigan 8,391 24.8 0.6 (23.6–26.1)
Minnesota 15,629 21.2 0.5 (20.3–22.1)
Mississippi 5,715 35.9 1.0 (34.0–37.8)
Missouri 6,851 26.1 0.8 (24.5–27.6)
Montana 5,757 21.7 0.9 (20.0–23.4)
Nebraska 16,319 24.8 0.5 (23.7–25.8)
Nevada 2,738 24.4 1.4 (21.7–27.0)
New Hampshire 6,394 21.8 0.8 (20.2–23.5)
New Jersey 10,486 26.7 0.8 (25.2–28.2)
New Mexico 6,120 22.1 0.8 (20.5–23.7)
New York 10,969 28.9 0.6 (27.7–30.2)
North Carolina 6,278 25.5 0.7 (24.1–26.8)
North Dakota 4,633 26.3 0.9 (24.6–28.1)
Ohio 10,963 26.1 0.8 (24.6–27.6)
Oklahoma 6,481 32.4 0.9 (30.7–34.2)
Oregon 4,819 18.1 0.8 (16.5–19.6)
Pennsylvania 5,265 26.9 0.9 (25.1–28.6)
Rhode Island 5,498 27.4 1.0 (25.4–29.3)
South Carolina 10,775 25.9 0.6 (24.6–27.1)
South Dakota 6,860 20.7 0.9 (19.0–22.4)
Tennessee 5,389 29.4 1.0 (27.4–31.5)
Texas 12,938 29.3 0.8 (27.8–30.9)
Utah 10,609 20.5 0.5 (19.5–21.4)
Vermont 6,006 21.3 0.8 (19.8–22.9)
Virginia 8,114 24.7 0.7 (23.3–26.0)
Washington 15,013 18.7 0.5 (17.8–19.7)
West Virginia 5,712 29.4 0.8 (27.9–30.9)
Wisconsin 5,534 21.0 0.8 (19.4–22.6)
Wyoming 5,040 25.8 1.0 (23.7–27.8)
Guam 1,514 32.7 1.8 (29.2–36.1)
Puerto Rico 5,301 47.1 0.9 (45.4–48.8)
Median 25.5
Range 17.6–47.1

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Any physical activities or exercises such as running, calisthenics, golfing, gardening, or walking for exercise.

TABLE 18. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported no leisure-time physical activity during the preceding month, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 550 23.5 2.8 (18.1–28.9)
Akron, Ohio 452 29.8 4.2 (21.5–38.0)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 845 24.9 2.2 (20.5–29.2)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,338 18.1 1.5 (15.3–21.0)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 749 28.6 3.3 (22.1–35.1)
Anchorage, Alaska 996 23.5 2.0 (19.5–27.5)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,852 24.3 1.4 (21.5–27.1)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 737 29.3 3.5 (22.4–36.2)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,680 21.4 1.5 (18.5–24.3)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,194 22.8 1.3 (20.4–25.3)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 577 29.9 2.4 (25.1–34.7)
Billings, Montana 645 19.6 2.1 (15.6–23.7)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,215 30.9 1.9 (27.1–34.6)
Bismarck, North Dakota 821 24.4 2.1 (20.2–28.6)
Boise City, Idaho 1,347 18.4 1.5 (15.4–21.3)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,119 26.1 1.3 (23.6–28.7)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 686 27.2 2.5 (22.3–32.1)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,663 19.8 1.4 (17.1–22.5)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,586 23.9 1.3 (21.3–26.5)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,433 25.9 1.8 (22.4–29.4)
Charleston, West Virginia 843 32.2 2.0 (28.2–36.2)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,447 22.3 1.5 (19.3–25.3)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,886 24.9 1.4 (22.1–27.7)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,379 24.8 1.0 (22.9–26.7)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,559 21.9 1.6 (18.8–25.0)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,493 22.1 1.6 (18.9–25.3)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 956 26.3 2.4 (21.7–31.0)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 507 26.0 4.0 (18.2–33.8)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,275 18.1 1.5 (15.1–21.1)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,165 23.2 1.6 (20.1–26.4)
Columbus, Ohio 1,654 25.2 1.7 (21.9–28.4)
Corpus Christi, Texas 523 32.3 3.9 (24.7–39.8)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,167 27.7 2.3 (23.1–32.3)
Dayton, Ohio 528 23.2 2.6 (18.2–28.3)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,132 17.0 0.8 (15.4–18.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 985 22.4 2.0 (18.5–26.2)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 906 18.8 1.7 (15.6–22.1)
El Paso, Texas 684 33.4 2.5 (28.5–38.4)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 934 21.3 1.6 (18.1–24.5)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 747 21.0 2.3 (16.4–25.6)
Florence, South Carolina 495 31.1 2.8 (25.6–36.6)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 547 25.9 2.7 (20.7–31.1)
Grand Island, Nebraska 728 30.1 2.3 (25.5–34.7)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 882 22.9 2.0 (18.9–26.8)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,390 23.3 1.6 (20.2–26.5)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 626 33.3 2.5 (28.4–38.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 730 32.8 4.4 (24.1–41.5)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,568 24.1 1.2 (21.8–26.4)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 581 20.5 2.7 (15.3–25.7)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,835 29.4 2.0 (25.5–33.3)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,164 30.0 1.7 (26.6–33.4)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 530 22.0 2.3 (17.5–26.6)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,834 26.4 1.5 (23.4–29.3)
Jackson, Mississippi 674 34.0 2.4 (29.2–38.8)
Jacksonville, Florida 597 22.7 2.7 (17.4–27.9)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,185 25.4 1.8 (21.9–28.9)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,016 23.9 1.0 (21.9–25.8)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 479 23.1 2.8 (17.5–28.6)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 480 27.5 3.7 (20.3–34.8)
Knoxville, Tennessee 526 22.6 2.4 (17.8–27.4)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,689 18.2 1.2 (15.9–20.5)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,035 33.1 2.6 (28.1–38.1)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 547 19.7 2.1 (15.5–23.9)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,545 18.9 1.0 (17.0–20.9)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,667 30.7 2.0 (26.8–34.7)
Manhattan, Kansas 639 19.1 1.8 (15.7–22.6)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 994 27.4 2.3 (22.8–31.9)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,811 25.6 1.5 (22.6–28.5)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,469 21.6 2.0 (17.8–25.5)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,107 19.2 0.6 (18.0–20.4)
Minot, North Dakota 485 31.3 3.0 (25.3–37.2)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 484 23.5 2.6 (18.3–28.6)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 961 22.6 1.8 (19.0–26.1)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 982 30.8 2.4 (26.0–35.6)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,296 24.6 1.5 (21.6–27.6)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,373 24.8 1.2 (22.4–27.2)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 874 28.1 1.9 (24.4–31.7)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 7,411 29.5 0.8 (28.0–31.0)
Norfolk, Nebraska 675 25.6 2.1 (21.5–29.7)
North Platte, Nebraska 605 25.9 2.1 (21.7–30.1)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 826 16.5 1.7 (13.1–19.9)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,945 21.8 1.1 (19.6–23.9)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,897 28.9 1.6 (25.8–32.0)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,735 24.0 1.0 (22.1–26.0)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 899 23.6 2.1 (19.4–27.8)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 714 29.6 2.4 (24.9–34.2)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,495 24.3 1.0 (22.3–26.3)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,177 26.3 1.6 (23.1–29.5)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,511 18.0 1.1 (15.8–20.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,938 16.6 1.0 (14.6–18.5)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,281 29.0 1.2 (26.7–31.3)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,640 18.3 1.1 (16.2–20.5)
Raleigh, North Carolina 645 22.7 1.9 (18.9–26.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,268 18.2 1.8 (14.6–21.8)
Reno, Nevada 875 19.3 1.9 (15.6–23.0)
Richmond, Virginia 1,288 25.0 1.6 (21.9–28.2)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,294 25.2 1.5 (22.3–28.1)
Rochester, Minnesota 651 24.4 2.1 (20.2–28.5)
Rochester, New York 709 30.9 2.7 (25.7–36.2)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,824 20.8 1.5 (17.9–23.8)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 903 18.2 1.6 (15.2–21.3)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 585 20.8 2.0 (17.0–24.7)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,097 24.5 1.5 (21.7–27.4)
Salina, Kansas 459 28.1 2.8 (22.6–33.6)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,900 30.0 2.8 (24.6–35.5)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,792 20.9 0.8 (19.3–22.5)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 695 29.3 2.4 (24.6–34.1)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 503 17.5 2.7 (12.2–22.8)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 570 16.1 1.8 (12.6–19.6)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,351 47.3 1.1 (45.2–49.5)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 621 28.0 2.4 (23.3–32.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,423 16.3 0.7 (14.8–17.7)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,139 18.5 1.7 (15.2–21.7)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 860 23.6 2.7 (18.3–29.0)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,285 19.6 1.7 (16.2–23.0)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 467 28.1 2.9 (22.5–33.7)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,450 18.3 1.3 (15.7–20.9)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,040 24.8 2.0 (21.0–28.7)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,376 25.3 1.9 (21.6–28.9)
Toledo, Ohio 671 24.8 2.6 (19.7–30.0)
Topeka, Kansas 1,903 29.4 1.5 (26.6–32.3)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,492 32.7 1.8 (29.1–36.3)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 526 34.9 2.9 (29.3–40.5)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,662 23.7 1.4 (21.0–26.4)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,991 23.4 1.3 (20.9–25.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,210 21.9 1.0 (19.8–23.9)
Wichita, Kansas 4,238 26.7 0.9 (24.9–28.6)
Wichita Falls, Texas 504 35.1 4.3 (26.6–43.6)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,081 27.6 1.6 (24.6–30.7)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,378 27.9 1.7 (24.5–31.3)
Median 24.5
Range 16.1–47.3

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Any physical activities or exercises such as running, calisthenics, golfing, gardening, or walking for exercise.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 19. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported consuming fruit less than once per day during the preceding month, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,124 48.2 0.9 (46.5–50.0)
Alaska 3,365 41.0 1.4 (38.2–43.7)
Arizona 7,075 40.0 0.9 (38.1–41.8)
Arkansas 4,642 50.0 1.4 (47.2–52.7)
California 11,090 36.1 0.6 (34.9–37.3)
Colorado 11,563 35.8 0.7 (34.3–37.2)
Connecticut 10,535 36.4 0.8 (34.9–37.9)
Delaware 3,670 38.9 1.3 (36.3–41.4)
District of Columbia 3,474 36.6 1.6 (33.5–39.8)
Florida 8,643 39.9 0.9 (38.2–41.6)
Georgia 4,144 44.9 1.1 (42.7–47.1)
Hawaii 6,572 41.8 0.9 (40.1–43.6)
Idaho 5,334 39.4 1.0 (37.4–41.5)
Illinois 4,957 38.7 0.9 (36.9–40.6)
Indiana 5,505 42.7 1.1 (40.6–44.8)
Iowa 5,660 42.4 1.0 (40.5–44.3)
Kansas 20,531 44.1 0.5 (43.2–45.0)
Kentucky 7,968 47.0 1.0 (45.1–49.0)
Louisiana 4,125 50.4 1.1 (48.3–52.5)
Maine 8,476 35.9 0.9 (34.1–37.7)
Maryland 11,257 36.2 1.0 (34.1–38.2)
Massachusetts 7,951 34.5 0.8 (33.0–36.0)
Michigan 8,252 40.5 0.8 (39.0–42.0)
Minnesota 15,389 37.4 0.5 (36.4–38.5)
Mississippi 5,469 51.3 1.0 (49.3–53.4)
Missouri 6,720 44.5 0.9 (42.7–46.4)
Montana 5,605 39.7 1.1 (37.6–41.8)
Nebraska 16,135 41.4 0.7 (40.1–42.7)
Nevada 2,670 36.9 1.6 (33.8–39.9)
New Hampshire 6,355 33.3 1.0 (31.4–35.3)
New Jersey 10,240 36.6 0.8 (35.0–38.3)
New Mexico 6,059 43.8 1.1 (41.7–46.0)
New York 10,918 37.9 0.7 (36.5–39.2)
North Carolina 6,085 43.3 0.8 (41.7–44.9)
North Dakota 4,579 40.9 1.0 (38.9–43.0)
Ohio 10,734 43.3 0.9 (41.5–45.0)
Oklahoma 6,411 51.3 1.0 (49.4–53.3)
Oregon 4,741 36.9 1.0 (34.9–38.8)
Pennsylvania 5,180 39.6 1.0 (37.7–41.6)
Rhode Island 5,474 38.4 1.1 (36.2–40.6)
South Carolina 10,479 47.6 0.8 (46.1–49.1)
South Dakota 6,791 43.2 1.1 (40.9–45.4)
Tennessee 5,251 45.2 1.2 (42.9–47.5)
Texas 12,819 42.7 0.8 (41.0–44.3)
Utah 10,487 37.3 0.6 (36.2–38.5)
Vermont 5,945 34.3 0.9 (32.5–36.1)
Virginia 7,938 40.3 0.8 (38.8–41.9)
Washington 14,798 36.9 0.6 (35.7–38.0)
West Virginia 5,451 50.3 0.9 (48.6–52.1)
Wisconsin 5,566 38.4 1.0 (36.4–40.4)
Wyoming 4,941 42.0 1.2 (39.6–44.4)
Guam 1,531 42.3 1.8 (38.8–45.8)
Puerto Rico 5,071 55.5 0.9 (53.8–57.2)
Median 40.5
Range 33.3–55.5

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Fresh fruit, frozen fruit, canned fruit, or 100% pure fruit juice.

TABLE 20. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported consuming fruit less than once per day during the preceding month, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 550 40.1 3.0 (34.1–46.0)
Akron, Ohio 443 41.0 3.9 (33.3–48.7)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 836 37.3 2.4 (32.6–42.0)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,336 44.6 2.0 (40.7–48.5)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 737 41.0 3.9 (33.4–48.6)
Anchorage, Alaska 993 39.6 2.3 (35.2–44.1)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,816 40.9 1.6 (37.8–44.0)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 721 46.1 3.7 (38.9–53.3)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,667 41.8 1.9 (38.1–45.5)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,144 37.6 1.6 (34.4–40.8)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 561 51.1 2.7 (45.8–56.4)
Billings, Montana 630 40.2 2.8 (34.8–45.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,192 45.9 2.1 (41.9–50.0)
Bismarck, North Dakota 817 38.0 2.5 (33.1–42.9)
Boise City, Idaho 1,342 39.7 2.0 (35.9–43.6)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,091 36.3 1.5 (33.4–39.1)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 684 33.1 2.6 (27.9–38.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,642 31.7 1.6 (28.5–34.8)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,526 31.7 1.4 (29.0–34.4)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,419 37.3 2.0 (33.3–41.2)
Charleston, West Virginia 821 48.7 2.2 (44.3–53.1)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,441 44.8 1.8 (41.3–48.3)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,845 44.2 1.7 (41.0–47.5)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,411 37.5 1.2 (35.2–39.8)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,534 42.3 2.1 (38.1–46.5)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,481 35.1 2.2 (30.7–39.4)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 943 39.3 2.7 (34.0–44.5)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 497 47.8 4.7 (38.7–57.0)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,254 35.3 2.0 (31.3–39.2)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,136 48.9 2.0 (44.9–52.9)
Columbus, Ohio 1,638 43.5 1.9 (39.7–47.2)
Corpus Christi, Texas 511 49.6 4.3 (41.1–58.0)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,156 34.4 2.4 (29.8–39.1)
Dayton, Ohio 522 43.8 3.4 (37.1–50.5)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,052 35.5 1.1 (33.3–37.7)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 977 41.4 2.3 (37.0–45.9)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 894 35.1 2.4 (30.3–39.9)
El Paso, Texas 676 43.5 2.6 (38.4–48.6)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 927 42.2 2.0 (38.2–46.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 743 42.1 3.3 (35.6–48.7)
Florence, South Carolina 481 51.3 3.1 (45.1–57.4)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 540 39.1 3.2 (32.7–45.4)
Grand Island, Nebraska 716 43.4 2.8 (37.9–49.0)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 868 42.3 2.3 (37.8–46.8)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,363 46.7 2.0 (42.8–50.6)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 599 51.8 3.0 (45.9–57.6)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 703 52.4 4.3 (43.9–60.9)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,547 36.0 1.3 (33.5–38.5)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 574 42.2 3.2 (35.9–48.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,819 42.5 2.2 (38.3–46.8)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,129 51.5 2.0 (47.6–55.3)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 528 35.7 2.7 (30.5–41.0)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,808 39.6 1.7 (36.2–42.9)
Jackson, Mississippi 645 50.2 2.7 (45.0–55.4)
Jacksonville, Florida 599 37.5 3.0 (31.6–43.4)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,195 37.2 2.0 (33.3–41.2)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 6,931 43.5 1.1 (41.2–45.7)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 481 44.0 3.2 (37.6–50.3)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 470 52.9 4.0 (45.2–60.7)
Knoxville, Tennessee 516 44.4 3.3 (37.9–50.8)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,667 38.3 1.6 (35.3–41.4)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,018 56.2 2.6 (51.1–61.4)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 547 35.6 2.5 (30.7–40.6)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,596 36.9 1.2 (34.5–39.3)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,666 46.6 2.2 (42.2–50.9)
Manhattan, Kansas 632 41.0 2.4 (36.4–45.7)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 955 44.9 2.9 (39.2–50.6)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,809 37.8 1.7 (34.4–41.2)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,481 36.3 2.2 (32.0–40.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 7,995 35.8 0.7 (34.4–37.2)
Minot, North Dakota 479 44.7 3.4 (38.0–51.4)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 479 34.7 3.0 (28.9–40.5)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 931 40.4 2.6 (35.4–45.4)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 962 45.2 2.5 (40.3–50.2)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,306 37.9 1.9 (34.2–41.7)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,294 37.5 1.5 (34.6–40.4)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 861 45.5 2.2 (41.1–49.8)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 7,288 37.0 0.8 (35.4–38.6)
Norfolk, Nebraska 667 43.8 2.5 (39.0–48.7)
North Platte, Nebraska 610 44.5 2.8 (38.9–50.0)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 833 32.4 2.1 (28.3–36.5)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,922 39.2 1.3 (36.6–41.8)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,889 50.8 1.8 (47.2–54.3)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,697 41.8 1.2 (39.5–44.1)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 896 41.9 2.5 (37.0–46.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 693 39.0 2.5 (34.1–43.8)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,439 39.0 1.1 (36.8–41.2)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,174 40.7 1.9 (36.9–44.4)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,505 33.4 1.6 (30.3–36.5)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,905 35.5 1.3 (33.0–38.0)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,249 36.7 1.3 (34.2–39.2)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,633 35.9 1.4 (33.2–38.6)
Raleigh, North Carolina 633 37.7 2.2 (33.4–42.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,256 40.2 2.4 (35.4–45.0)
Reno, Nevada 868 34.5 2.3 (30.0–39.1)
Richmond, Virginia 1,261 37.6 1.8 (34.1–41.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,316 36.6 1.7 (33.3–39.8)
Rochester, Minnesota 640 35.9 2.4 (31.2–40.7)
Rochester, New York 708 35.8 2.8 (30.3–41.2)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,810 34.4 1.9 (30.8–38.1)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 908 37.1 1.9 (33.3–40.9)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 583 38.5 2.4 (33.8–43.3)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,073 40.1 1.6 (37.0–43.3)
Salina, Kansas 448 43.4 3.1 (37.3–49.5)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,855 41.6 2.8 (36.0–47.1)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,746 35.8 1.0 (33.9–37.7)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 691 44.8 2.6 (39.7–50.0)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 516 33.1 2.7 (27.8–38.4)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 576 33.8 2.4 (29.1–38.6)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,205 55.8 1.1 (53.6–58.0)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 615 37.6 2.6 (32.5–42.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,340 36.7 0.9 (34.9–38.5)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,114 30.1 2.1 (25.9–34.3)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 846 44.2 3.9 (36.6–51.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,282 45.7 2.3 (41.2–50.3)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 451 40.3 3.5 (33.4–47.1)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,430 40.6 2.0 (36.7–44.4)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,016 43.6 2.4 (38.9–48.2)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,363 40.4 2.1 (36.3–44.5)
Toledo, Ohio 653 46.1 3.1 (40.0–52.2)
Topeka, Kansas 1,865 46.5 1.6 (43.4–49.6)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,477 49.7 2.0 (45.8–53.6)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 516 57.3 2.8 (51.8–62.9)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,628 39.4 1.7 (36.1–42.8)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,977 37.8 1.5 (34.8–40.7)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,081 36.4 1.2 (34.1–38.7)
Wichita, Kansas 4,188 44.5 1.0 (42.5–46.6)
Wichita Falls, Texas 499 48.3 4.2 (40.1–56.5)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,040 37.9 1.7 (34.6–41.3)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,354 34.9 1.8 (31.3–38.5)
Median 40.3
Range 30.1–57.3

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Fresh fruit, frozen fruit, canned fruit, or 100% pure fruit juice.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 21. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported consuming vegetables less than once per day during the preceding month, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 6,938 28.2 0.8 (26.6–29.8)
Alaska 3,322 18.9 1.1 (16.7–21.1)
Arizona 6,909 20.8 0.8 (19.1–22.4)
Arkansas 4,526 28.6 1.3 (26.0–31.2)
California 10,851 18.8 0.5 (17.8–19.8)
Colorado 11,361 17.8 0.6 (16.6–19.0)
Connecticut 10,352 19.9 0.7 (18.5–21.2)
Delaware 3,571 20.9 1.1 (18.8–23.1)
District of Columbia 3,414 19.2 1.4 (16.6–21.9)
Florida 8,480 21.6 0.7 (20.1–23.0)
Georgia 4,087 24.8 1.0 (22.8–26.8)
Hawaii 6,438 21.7 0.8 (20.1–23.3)
Idaho 5,235 18.7 0.9 (17.0–20.4)
Illinois 4,894 24.6 0.9 (22.9–26.3)
Indiana 5,392 26.8 1.0 (24.9–28.8)
Iowa 5,566 27.2 0.9 (25.5–29.0)
Kansas 20,067 22.5 0.4 (21.7–23.3)
Kentucky 7,758 24.8 0.9 (23.1–26.5)
Louisiana 4,038 30.8 1.0 (28.9–32.8)
Maine 8,357 18.7 0.7 (17.2–20.1)
Maryland 11,016 21.5 0.9 (19.7–23.3)
Massachusetts 7,796 18.4 0.7 (17.1–19.8)
Michigan 8,157 25.2 0.7 (23.9–26.5)
Minnesota 15,078 22.5 0.5 (21.5–23.4)
Mississippi 5,403 31.3 1.0 (29.3–33.3)
Missouri 6,576 23.3 0.8 (21.7–24.9)
Montana 5,502 19.3 0.9 (17.6–21.0)
Nebraska 15,850 24.9 0.6 (23.8–26.1)
Nevada 2,612 19.2 1.3 (16.7–21.8)
New Hampshire 6,213 17.6 0.8 (15.9–19.2)
New Jersey 10,059 22.3 0.7 (20.9–23.8)
New Mexico 5,960 21.8 0.9 (20.0–23.6)
New York 10,698 22.5 0.6 (21.3–23.7)
North Carolina 5,959 21.6 0.7 (20.2–23.0)
North Dakota 4,519 27.7 1.0 (25.8–29.6)
Ohio 10,509 24.7 0.8 (23.2–26.2)
Oklahoma 6,262 24.5 0.9 (22.8–26.3)
Oregon 4,651 16.6 0.8 (15.0–18.2)
Pennsylvania 5,111 24.2 0.9 (22.4–26.0)
Rhode Island 5,309 24.1 1.0 (22.1–26.2)
South Carolina 10,293 25.5 0.7 (24.1–26.8)
South Dakota 6,698 26.5 1.0 (24.4–28.5)
Tennessee 5,103 22.4 1.0 (20.5–24.3)
Texas 12,486 19.6 0.7 (18.2–21.0)
Utah 10,359 19.9 0.5 (18.9–20.9)
Vermont 5,838 17.8 0.8 (16.3–19.3)
Virginia 7,811 21.9 0.7 (20.5–23.3)
Washington 14,526 16.9 0.5 (16.0–17.9)
West Virginia 5,431 26.4 0.8 (24.9–27.9)
Wisconsin 5,507 24.1 0.9 (22.4–25.9)
Wyoming 4,841 21.7 1.1 (19.6–23.9)
Guam 1,502 27.1 1.7 (23.9–30.4)
Puerto Rico 5,148 24.5 0.8 (23.0–26.0)
Median 22.4
Range 16.6–31.3

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Dark green vegetables, orange-colored vegetables, beans, or other vegetables.

TABLE 22. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who reported consuming vegetables less than once per day during the preceding month, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 538 26.5 3.0 (20.5–32.4)
Akron, Ohio 427 16.1 2.2 (11.7–20.5)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 821 23.7 2.2 (19.4–28.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,322 20.3 1.7 (17.0–23.5)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 721 28.0 3.8 (20.5–35.5)
Anchorage, Alaska 978 16.6 1.7 (13.2–20.0)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,810 22.0 1.4 (19.2–24.7)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 704 26.1 3.1 (20.0–32.2)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,636 15.6 1.4 (13.0–18.3)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,059 23.0 1.5 (20.2–25.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 551 30.9 2.5 (26.0–35.8)
Billings, Montana 622 20.5 2.1 (16.4–24.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,167 29.0 2.0 (25.1–32.8)
Bismarck, North Dakota 808 26.2 2.3 (21.7–30.7)
Boise City, Idaho 1,309 19.7 1.7 (16.5–23.0)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,044 18.3 1.1 (16.0–20.5)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 671 24.6 2.6 (19.5–29.8)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,613 14.4 1.3 (11.9–16.8)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,491 15.4 1.1 (13.3–17.6)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,375 21.6 1.7 (18.3–24.9)
Charleston, West Virginia 806 25.9 2.0 (21.9–29.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,400 23.5 1.6 (20.4–26.5)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,820 22.3 1.5 (19.4–25.2)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,364 23.6 1.0 (21.6–25.6)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,517 25.1 1.9 (21.4–28.8)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,451 21.1 2.0 (17.1–25.1)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 928 23.2 2.2 (18.8–27.6)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 487 17.1 3.8 (9.7–24.5)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,225 20.2 1.8 (16.7–23.7)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,127 25.9 1.9 (22.3–29.6)
Columbus, Ohio 1,602 23.5 1.7 (20.2–26.8)
Corpus Christi, Texas 495 20.5 3.5 (13.6–27.3)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,115 17.1 2.0 (13.2–21.0)
Dayton, Ohio 511 22.4 3.0 (16.6–28.2)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 4,952 16.9 0.8 (15.3–18.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 960 27.6 2.1 (23.5–31.7)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 876 17.7 1.7 (14.3–21.1)
El Paso, Texas 667 20.8 2.2 (16.5–25.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 902 28.1 1.9 (24.3–31.9)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 722 22.4 3.0 (16.4–28.3)
Florence, South Carolina 475 28.4 2.7 (23.1–33.7)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 521 20.4 2.9 (14.8–26.0)
Grand Island, Nebraska 707 27.6 2.7 (22.3–32.8)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 857 25.7 2.1 (21.6–29.9)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,331 22.8 1.7 (19.5–26.1)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 590 24.6 2.8 (19.0–30.1)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 696 29.6 4.5 (20.8–38.4)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,479 21.0 1.2 (18.7–23.3)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 556 23.7 2.9 (18.0–29.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,784 20.0 1.9 (16.3–23.6)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,124 26.3 1.8 (22.8–29.7)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 522 20.0 2.3 (15.5–24.5)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,786 25.4 1.6 (22.4–28.5)
Jackson, Mississippi 642 32.0 2.6 (26.9–37.0)
Jacksonville, Florida 582 24.4 3.0 (18.5–30.3)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,170 19.3 1.7 (16.0–22.6)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 6,830 21.3 1.0 (19.4–23.2)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 462 23.8 3.0 (18.0–29.7)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 459 28.8 3.9 (21.2–36.3)
Knoxville, Tennessee 505 19.7 2.7 (14.3–25.0)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,652 21.9 1.4 (19.3–24.6)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,005 30.7 2.6 (25.5–35.8)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 535 19.0 2.1 (15.0–23.1)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,529 19.6 1.0 (17.6–21.7)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,618 24.5 2.0 (20.6–28.4)
Manhattan, Kansas 621 20.7 2.0 (16.8–24.6)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 944 26.2 2.6 (21.1–31.2)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,779 19.2 1.4 (16.5–21.9)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,458 24.3 2.0 (20.3–28.3)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 7,832 21.6 0.6 (20.4–22.9)
Minot, North Dakota 476 28.0 3.2 (21.8–34.3)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 471 21.4 2.8 (15.9–26.8)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 911 19.3 2.1 (15.2–23.5)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 937 20.1 1.8 (16.5–23.6)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,276 22.1 1.7 (18.8–25.3)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,256 22.3 1.3 (19.7–24.9)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 840 27.5 1.9 (23.8–31.2)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 7,162 22.2 0.7 (20.8–23.6)
Norfolk, Nebraska 660 26.9 2.2 (22.6–31.2)
North Platte, Nebraska 595 24.4 2.5 (19.4–29.3)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 823 15.2 1.6 (12.0–18.4)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,906 21.1 1.1 (19.0–23.3)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,856 23.1 1.6 (20.0–26.2)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,634 25.7 1.1 (23.6–27.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 885 19.4 2.0 (15.4–23.4)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 684 22.5 2.1 (18.4–26.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,345 20.4 1.0 (18.5–22.3)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,155 27.1 1.8 (23.5–30.7)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,467 16.0 1.2 (13.6–18.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,848 14.9 1.0 (12.9–16.9)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,068 25.3 1.4 (22.5–28.1)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,617 17.7 1.2 (15.4–20.0)
Raleigh, North Carolina 616 16.0 1.8 (12.6–19.5)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,248 22.7 2.2 (18.3–27.1)
Reno, Nevada 849 19.1 1.9 (15.4–22.9)
Richmond, Virginia 1,242 24.4 1.6 (21.2–27.6)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,290 19.5 1.4 (16.8–22.3)
Rochester, Minnesota 639 23.4 2.2 (19.0–27.8)
Rochester, New York 702 23.6 2.5 (18.8–28.5)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,791 17.2 1.6 (14.1–20.3)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 899 19.5 1.6 (16.3–22.7)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 568 24.1 2.1 (20.0–28.2)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,033 25.0 1.6 (21.9–28.0)
Salina, Kansas 438 23.8 2.7 (18.4–29.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,808 26.6 2.9 (20.9–32.3)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,697 20.0 0.8 (18.4–21.7)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 677 17.5 1.9 (13.9–21.2)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 504 14.2 2.0 (10.3–18.2)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 566 13.6 1.7 (10.3–16.9)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,247 25.3 1.0 (23.4–27.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 602 27.3 2.4 (22.5–32.1)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,246 15.6 0.7 (14.2–17.0)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,072 15.1 1.7 (11.8–18.5)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 831 27.4 3.6 (20.3–34.4)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,258 28.9 2.1 (24.8–33.1)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 447 22.9 3.1 (16.9–29.0)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,401 17.2 1.4 (14.4–20.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 989 22.1 2.0 (18.2–26.0)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,341 21.9 1.9 (18.2–25.5)
Toledo, Ohio 640 27.4 2.8 (22.0–32.8)
Topeka, Kansas 1,823 23.1 1.4 (20.4–25.9)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,439 21.1 1.7 (17.7–24.5)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 508 29.8 2.7 (24.5–35.0)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,597 22.3 1.5 (19.3–25.3)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,943 21.9 1.3 (19.4–24.4)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 6,977 19.2 1.0 (17.3–21.1)
Wichita, Kansas 4,095 23.5 0.9 (21.6–25.3)
Wichita Falls, Texas 487 25.2 4.2 (17.0–33.4)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,985 21.3 1.6 (18.3–24.4)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,340 20.3 1.6 (17.2–23.4)
Median 22.3
Range 13.6–32.0

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Dark green vegetables, orange-colored vegetables, beans, or other vegetables.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 23. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of obesity among adults aged ≥18 years, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,383 35.5 0.8 (33.9–37.2)
Alaska 3,434 29.9 1.2 (27.4–32.3)
Arizona 7,152 28.4 0.8 (26.8–30.1)
Arkansas 4,813 34.4 1.3 (31.8–36.9)
California 11,459 24.0 0.5 (23.0–25.1)
Colorado 12,183 19.9 0.6 (18.8–21.0)
Connecticut 10,901 24.6 0.6 (23.4–25.9)
Delaware 3,688 29.2 1.2 (26.9–31.5)
District of Columbia 3,654 22.7 1.2 (20.3–25.2)
Florida 8,985 26.3 0.7 (24.9–27.7)
Georgia 4,269 30.2 1.0 (28.3–32.2)
Hawaii 6,822 22.9 0.7 (21.4–24.3)
Idaho 5,358 28.4 0.9 (26.6–30.2)
Illinois 5,081 30.2 0.9 (28.5–31.9)
Indiana 5,647 30.8 1.0 (28.9–32.7)
Iowa 5,614 31.8 0.9 (30.1–33.6)
Kansas 20,930 34.1 0.4 (33.2–34.9)
Kentucky 8,130 34.2 0.9 (32.3–36.0)
Louisiana 4,324 36.0 1.0 (34.0–37.9)
Maine 8,579 29.6 0.8 (28.0–31.2)
Maryland 11,357 28.2 0.9 (26.4–30.1)
Massachusetts 8,206 23.5 0.7 (22.2–24.8)
Michigan 8,329 30.8 0.7 (29.4–32.1)
Minnesota 15,340 25.5 0.5 (24.6–26.4)
Mississippi 5,664 35.8 1.0 (33.8–37.8)
Missouri 6,764 32.1 0.9 (30.4–33.8)
Montana 5,563 23.0 0.9 (21.3–24.7)
Nebraska 16,265 30.9 0.6 (29.7–32.1)
Nevada 2,701 26.4 1.4 (23.7–29.2)
New Hampshire 6,366 25.7 0.9 (24.0–27.4)
New Jersey 10,184 24.9 0.7 (23.6–26.3)
New Mexico 6,206 29.1 1.0 (27.2–31.0)
New York 11,281 24.6 0.6 (23.4–25.7)
North Carolina 6,019 29.7 0.8 (28.2–31.2)
North Dakota 4,612 30.7 0.9 (28.9–32.5)
Ohio 10,924 29.1 0.8 (27.6–30.6)
Oklahoma 6,521 33.7 0.9 (32.0–35.5)
Oregon 4,905 29.9 0.9 (28.1–31.6)
Pennsylvania 5,335 29.2 0.9 (27.5–30.9)
Rhode Island 5,668 25.4 0.9 (23.7–27.2)
South Carolina 10,865 31.5 0.7 (30.2–32.8)
South Dakota 6,707 30.0 1.0 (28.0–32.0)
Tennessee 5,475 33.6 1.1 (31.5–35.7)
Texas 13,230 32.1 0.8 (30.6–33.6)
Utah 10,455 24.7 0.5 (23.7–25.7)
Vermont 6,008 24.4 0.8 (22.9–25.9)
Virginia 8,030 28.8 0.7 (27.4–30.2)
Washington 14,694 26.0 0.5 (25.0–27.0)
West Virginia 5,471 35.2 0.8 (33.6–36.7)
Wisconsin 5,755 30.0 0.9 (28.2–31.8)
Wyoming 5,010 28.8 1.1 (26.7–31.0)
Guam 1,588 30.8 1.7 (27.5–34.2)
Puerto Rico 5,154 29.5 0.8 (27.9–31.2)
Median 29.5
Range 19.9–36.0

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Body mass index ≥30 kg/m2.

TABLE 24. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of obesity among adults aged ≥18 years, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 533 29.9 2.7 (24.6–35.3)
Akron, Ohio 465 25.3 3.4 (18.5–32.0)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 859 27.8 2.2 (23.5–32.0)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,363 28.1 1.8 (24.6–31.6)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 726 33.3 3.5 (26.4–40.2)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,011 29.7 2.0 (25.7–33.6)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,851 26.4 1.4 (23.7–29.2)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 736 24.9 2.3 (20.3–29.5)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,716 25.8 1.6 (22.6–28.9)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,166 29.9 1.5 (27.0–32.8)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 606 34.0 2.4 (29.2–38.8)
Billings, Montana 625 25.8 2.5 (20.9–30.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,239 34.1 1.9 (30.5–37.8)
Bismarck, North Dakota 808 33.1 2.3 (28.5–37.7)
Boise City, Idaho 1,355 27.7 1.7 (24.4–31.1)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,164 21.8 1.2 (19.4–24.1)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 690 32.0 2.7 (26.8–37.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,654 20.3 1.2 (17.9–22.7)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,565 21.4 1.1 (19.2–23.6)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,416 27.7 1.7 (24.3–31.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 805 37.1 2.1 (33.1–41.2)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,483 27.4 1.6 (24.2–30.5)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,848 30.4 1.5 (27.4–33.4)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,521 29.4 1.0 (27.3–31.4)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,553 28.2 1.9 (24.5–31.8)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,471 25.2 1.8 (21.7–28.8)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 962 27.4 2.1 (23.2–31.5)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 514 32.5 4.3 (24.2–40.9)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,301 21.0 1.7 (17.7–24.2)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,167 32.0 1.8 (28.4–35.6)
Columbus, Ohio 1,654 29.7 1.7 (26.4–33.1)
Corpus Christi, Texas 529 41.6 4.2 (33.3–49.9)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,156 30.3 2.3 (25.8–34.7)
Dayton, Ohio 531 26.5 2.8 (21.0–32.1)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,312 19.3 0.8 (17.7–21.0)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 983 28.5 2.1 (24.4–32.6)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 891 27.7 2.1 (23.6–31.8)
El Paso, Texas 687 29.5 2.2 (25.3–33.8)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 930 27.6 1.8 (24.1–31.1)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 751 25.4 2.9 (19.8–31.0)
Florence, South Carolina 504 35.2 2.8 (29.8–40.6)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 559 28.9 2.9 (23.2–34.5)
Grand Island, Nebraska 726 29.3 2.4 (24.6–33.9)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 864 28.7 2.1 (24.5–32.8)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,406 30.0 1.8 (26.5–33.5)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 628 31.5 2.7 (26.2–36.7)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 716 37.2 4.5 (28.3–46.0)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,646 23.6 1.0 (21.6–25.6)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 578 28.0 2.9 (22.3–33.7)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,906 30.8 2.0 (26.9–34.6)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,134 32.6 1.9 (29.0–36.3)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 525 28.1 2.5 (23.2–33.1)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,864 31.7 1.6 (28.5–34.9)
Jackson, Mississippi 664 34.6 2.4 (29.8–39.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 613 30.6 2.8 (25.0–36.1)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,245 22.4 1.7 (19.1–25.7)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,005 32.9 1.1 (30.8–35.1)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 466 27.6 2.9 (21.9–33.4)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 474 35.4 3.8 (28.0–42.9)
Knoxville, Tennessee 533 32.5 3.0 (26.5–38.4)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,677 28.8 1.4 (26.0–31.6)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,066 33.2 2.5 (28.3–38.0)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 543 28.6 2.4 (23.9–33.2)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,726 22.5 1.0 (20.5–24.5)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,687 33.3 2.0 (29.3–37.2)
Manhattan, Kansas 643 25.2 2.0 (21.2–29.2)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 998 36.8 2.7 (31.6–42.0)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,923 25.7 1.5 (22.7–28.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,530 33.4 2.2 (29.1–37.6)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 7,915 23.7 0.6 (22.5–24.9)
Minot, North Dakota 483 27.9 2.6 (22.8–33.1)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 478 24.2 2.5 (19.4–29.1)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 949 26.9 2.2 (22.6–31.3)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 978 30.9 2.2 (26.6–35.3)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,340 24.3 1.7 (21.0–27.6)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,236 24.2 1.2 (21.8–26.6)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 902 31.1 1.9 (27.3–34.9)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 7,486 22.7 0.7 (21.4–24.0)
Norfolk, Nebraska 689 34.3 2.2 (29.9–38.7)
North Platte, Nebraska 610 31.0 2.5 (26.2–35.9)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 882 17.8 1.6 (14.7–20.9)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,912 25.4 1.1 (23.2–27.6)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,893 29.2 1.6 (26.1–32.3)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,700 31.0 1.1 (28.9–33.2)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 930 23.5 1.9 (19.7–27.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 739 25.7 1.9 (21.9–29.5)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,488 28.5 1.0 (26.5–30.5)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,186 30.8 1.7 (27.4–34.2)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,541 26.3 1.4 (23.5–29.1)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,943 29.0 1.2 (26.6–31.3)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,471 26.8 1.0 (24.8–28.9)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,614 25.2 1.2 (22.8–27.6)
Raleigh, North Carolina 612 23.1 1.9 (19.4–26.8)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,244 29.0 2.2 (24.6–33.4)
Reno, Nevada 870 20.2 1.8 (16.6–23.8)
Richmond, Virginia 1,278 30.4 1.6 (27.2–33.6)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,365 28.4 1.5 (25.4–31.4)
Rochester, Minnesota 633 27.1 2.2 (22.7–31.4)
Rochester, New York 745 25.4 2.2 (21.0–29.7)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,831 24.3 1.5 (21.3–27.3)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 948 23.9 1.7 (20.5–27.3)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 580 25.5 2.3 (21.1–30.0)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,082 31.0 1.5 (28.0–33.9)
Salina, Kansas 456 36.3 2.9 (30.6–42.0)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,873 33.5 2.7 (28.2–38.8)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,728 24.0 0.8 (22.4–25.6)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 698 35.2 2.5 (30.3–40.0)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 526 17.9 2.0 (14.0–21.9)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 594 18.6 1.8 (15.0–22.2)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,252 30.1 1.0 (28.1–32.2)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 625 36.6 2.5 (31.7–41.5)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,279 22.8 0.8 (21.2–24.4)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,080 19.3 1.8 (15.8–22.8)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 830 34.8 3.7 (27.5–42.1)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,252 30.4 2.1 (26.3–34.5)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 477 29.1 3.1 (23.0–35.2)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,434 27.4 1.8 (24.0–30.9)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,060 28.4 2.0 (24.5–32.3)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,430 24.4 1.7 (21.1–27.7)
Toledo, Ohio 641 27.7 2.6 (22.5–32.8)
Topeka, Kansas 1,904 37.5 1.5 (34.5–40.4)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,498 31.1 1.8 (27.6–34.6)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 533 30.1 2.6 (25.0–35.2)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,649 30.3 1.5 (27.3–33.3)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,986 28.8 1.4 (26.1–31.5)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,225 25.4 1.0 (23.5–27.4)
Wichita, Kansas 4,290 35.6 1.0 (33.7–37.5)
Wichita Falls, Texas 528 34.6 4.0 (26.7–42.4)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,045 26.2 1.5 (23.3–29.1)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,423 27.7 1.7 (24.3–31.0)
Median 28.5
Range 17.8–41.6

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Body mass index ≥30 kg/m2.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 25. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥45 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have diabetes, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 5,803 20.3 0.7 (18.9–21.6)
Alaska 2,495 14.2 1.2 (11.8–16.6)
Arizona 6,180 15.9 0.7 (14.6–17.2)
Arkansas 4,338 20.0 1.0 (18.0–22.1)
California 7,221 16.9 0.6 (15.6–18.1)
Colorado 9,610 11.2 0.5 (10.3–12.1)
Connecticut 9,144 14.0 0.5 (13.0–15.1)
Delaware 3,050 18.1 1.0 (16.2–20.1)
District of Columbia 3,174 16.8 1.2 (14.4–19.2)
Florida 7,625 16.7 0.6 (15.5–18.0)
Georgia 3,477 19.9 0.9 (18.1–21.6)
Hawaii 5,001 13.0 0.7 (11.7–14.3)
Idaho 4,272 13.0 0.7 (11.7–14.3)
Illinois 3,772 16.1 0.7 (14.7–17.5)
Indiana 4,709 17.3 0.8 (15.7–18.9)
Iowa 4,768 13.7 0.6 (12.5–14.9)
Kansas 16,534 15.4 0.3 (14.8–16.1)
Kentucky 6,557 20.2 0.8 (18.5–21.8)
Louisiana 3,429 20.3 0.9 (18.6–22.0)
Maine 7,175 13.5 0.5 (12.4–14.5)
Maryland 10,287 16.6 0.7 (15.1–18.0)
Massachusetts 6,329 14.1 0.6 (12.9–15.4)
Michigan 6,367 15.8 0.6 (14.6–16.9)
Minnesota 11,778 11.9 0.4 (11.2–12.6)
Mississippi 4,678 22.4 0.9 (20.7–24.1)
Missouri 5,483 17.5 0.7 (16.2–18.9)
Montana 4,655 11.5 0.6 (10.3–12.7)
Nebraska 12,728 14.0 0.5 (13.1–14.9)
Nevada 2,136 15.4 1.3 (12.9–18.0)
New Hampshire 5,717 12.2 0.5 (11.2–13.2)
New Jersey 8,322 14.6 0.6 (13.4–15.7)
New Mexico 5,092 17.2 0.8 (15.6–18.8)
New York 8,927 15.5 0.5 (14.5–16.5)
North Carolina 4,486 17.2 0.7 (15.9–18.6)
North Dakota 3,668 14.7 0.8 (13.2–16.2)
Ohio 9,445 17.8 0.6 (16.5–19.0)
Oklahoma 5,402 19.0 0.7 (17.5–20.4)
Oregon 3,925 16.3 0.8 (14.7–17.8)
Pennsylvania 4,042 15.7 0.7 (14.3–17.1)
Rhode Island 4,824 14.4 0.7 (13.0–15.7)
South Carolina 8,654 18.4 0.6 (17.3–19.6)
South Dakota 5,402 13.9 0.8 (12.4–15.5)
Tennessee 4,623 19.1 0.9 (17.3–20.9)
Texas 10,556 19.7 0.8 (18.2–21.3)
Utah 6,651 13.7 0.5 (12.7–14.8)
Vermont 4,822 12.0 0.6 (10.8–13.2)
Virginia 6,158 16.7 0.7 (15.4–18.0)
Washington 12,005 13.5 0.4 (12.7–14.4)
West Virginia 4,221 20.6 0.8 (19.1–22.1)
Wisconsin 4,504 12.8 0.7 (11.5–14.1)
Wyoming 4,434 13.8 0.8 (12.3–15.3)
Guam 822 26.0 2.5 (21.1–30.8)
Puerto Rico 3,642 26.8 0.9 (25.1–28.5)
Median 15.9
Range 11.2–26.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Excluding diabetes during pregnancy or prediabetes or borderline diabetes in adults.

TABLE 26. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥45 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have diabetes, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 447 12.9 2.0 (9.0–16.8)
Akron, Ohio 402 14.9 2.1 (10.8–19.0)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 720 15.1 1.8 (11.6–18.7)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,080 17.0 1.6 (13.9–20.0)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 648 20.2 2.8 (14.7–25.7)
Anchorage, Alaska 713 14.9 2.0 (11.0–18.7)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,443 16.9 1.3 (14.4–19.3)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 591 22.8 3.2 (16.6–29.1)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,337 15.6 1.6 (12.5–18.7)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 3,706 17.0 1.1 (14.8–19.1)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 445 19.7 2.2 (15.4–24.1)
Billings, Montana 509 12.5 1.7 (9.3–15.8)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 957 18.8 1.6 (15.7–22.0)
Bismarck, North Dakota 673 15.4 1.9 (11.6–19.2)
Boise City, Idaho 1,044 11.9 1.3 (9.5–14.4)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 1,610 12.8 1.1 (10.7–15.0)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 584 13.6 1.6 (10.5–16.8)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,246 10.9 1.1 (8.7–13.1)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 1,987 14.3 1.1 (12.1–16.6)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,098 14.3 1.4 (11.5–17.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 633 25.2 2.2 (20.9–29.4)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,109 15.8 1.4 (13.1–18.5)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,403 19.1 1.5 (16.2–22.1)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 2,569 16.5 0.9 (14.7–18.4)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,291 18.3 1.9 (14.6–22.0)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,285 13.3 1.3 (10.8–15.8)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 827 17.9 2.0 (14.1–21.8)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 441 18.6 3.3 (12.2–25.0)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,068 12.1 1.4 (9.4–14.8)
Columbia, South Carolina 853 17.9 1.8 (14.4–21.5)
Columbus, Ohio 1,337 17.5 1.5 (14.6–20.5)
Corpus Christi, Texas 471 27.6 3.4 (20.9–34.2)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 954 20.6 2.7 (15.4–25.8)
Dayton, Ohio 445 16.7 2.2 (12.4–21.0)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 3,930 11.4 0.7 (10.0–12.7)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 806 12.0 1.5 (9.0–14.9)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 719 14.1 1.6 (10.9–17.3)
El Paso, Texas 520 23.2 2.2 (18.8–27.6)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 658 12.5 1.5 (9.5–15.4)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 651 13.9 2.3 (9.5–18.4)
Florence, South Carolina 373 20.0 2.6 (14.9–25.1)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 447 15.8 2.2 (11.4–20.2)
Grand Island, Nebraska 573 14.1 1.7 (10.7–17.5)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 658 14.9 1.8 (11.5–18.4)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,096 17.7 1.5 (14.7–20.7)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 503 22.1 2.4 (17.4–26.8)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 644 16.8 1.9 (13.1–20.6)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,086 15.0 0.9 (13.1–16.8)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 503 15.0 2.2 (10.7–19.2)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,546 20.6 2.2 (16.4–24.9)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 870 22.8 1.8 (19.2–26.4)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 395 14.7 2.1 (10.5–18.8)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,509 16.9 1.4 (14.2–19.7)
Jackson, Mississippi 479 22.1 2.4 (17.3–26.9)
Jacksonville, Florida 497 18.4 2.2 (14.0–22.8)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 954 11.0 1.5 (8.0–14.0)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 5,532 16.3 0.9 (14.6–18.0)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 395 14.4 2.2 (10.0–18.8)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 431 19.5 2.4 (14.8–24.2)
Knoxville, Tennessee 446 18.7 2.4 (13.9–23.4)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,112 11.3 1.1 (9.1–13.5)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 914 20.4 2.2 (16.0–24.8)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 328 12.4 2.0 (8.5–16.2)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 1,615 18.7 1.4 (16.0–21.5)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,463 19.4 1.9 (15.7–23.1)
Manhattan, Kansas 423 12.4 2.0 (8.5–16.3)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 832 21.2 2.3 (16.7–25.6)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,559 15.9 1.4 (13.3–18.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,246 14.9 1.4 (12.1–17.7)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 5,983 11.4 0.5 (10.4–12.3)
Minot, North Dakota 378 12.6 1.8 (9.0–16.2)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 350 12.7 2.1 (8.5–16.9)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 771 15.6 1.9 (11.9–19.3)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 800 15.8 2.1 (11.6–19.9)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,095 12.9 1.2 (10.5–15.3)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 2,734 14.5 1.0 (12.5–16.5)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 665 19.8 1.8 (16.4–23.3)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 5,583 16.3 0.7 (15.0–17.6)
Norfolk, Nebraska 499 17.2 2.0 (13.3–21.1)
North Platte, Nebraska 491 15.6 1.9 (11.8–19.4)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 552 14.1 2.0 (10.2–18.1)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,159 14.0 1.2 (11.6–16.4)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,597 18.9 1.3 (16.4–21.4)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 2,832 14.8 0.9 (13.1–16.5)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 738 20.0 2.2 (15.7–24.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 501 19.8 2.1 (15.6–24.0)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 3,796 15.2 0.7 (13.8–16.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 903 14.4 1.3 (11.8–17.0)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,163 13.4 1.0 (11.4–15.4)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,309 14.4 1.0 (12.5–16.3)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 5,468 15.9 1.1 (13.8–18.0)
Provo-Orem, Utah 812 11.6 1.4 (9.0–14.3)
Raleigh, North Carolina 372 15.1 2.0 (11.1–19.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,033 16.2 2.1 (12.1–20.3)
Reno, Nevada 710 12.9 1.6 (9.7–16.1)
Richmond, Virginia 933 18.0 1.6 (15.0–21.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 884 17.3 1.6 (14.3–20.4)
Rochester, Minnesota 462 10.5 1.6 (7.4–13.5)
Rochester, New York 619 15.7 2.1 (11.5–19.8)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,621 12.8 1.0 (10.8–14.9)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 589 13.9 1.9 (10.1–17.7)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 400 10.6 1.7 (7.3–13.9)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,646 15.7 1.2 (13.4–18.0)
Salina, Kansas 361 14.1 2.0 (10.1–18.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,689 17.5 1.6 (14.4–20.6)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,395 15.0 0.9 (13.2–16.8)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 512 16.8 2.0 (13.0–20.7)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 280 14.9 3.3 (8.5–21.4)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 342 12.1 2.0 (8.1–16.1)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 2,314 27.2 1.1 (25.0–29.3)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 505 19.3 2.3 (14.7–23.8)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,109 12.3 0.7 (11.0–13.6)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 1,859 12.9 1.4 (10.3–15.6)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 731 13.7 2.2 (9.4–18.0)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 962 13.0 1.5 (10.1–15.9)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 375 21.8 3.2 (15.5–28.2)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,189 13.3 1.2 (11.0–15.7)
Springfield, Massachusetts 840 15.3 1.8 (11.7–18.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,179 16.6 1.6 (13.5–19.7)
Toledo, Ohio 570 16.9 1.9 (13.2–20.5)
Topeka, Kansas 1,547 15.0 1.1 (12.8–17.3)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,216 18.6 1.6 (15.5–21.8)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 380 21.2 2.4 (16.5–26.0)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,284 20.1 1.5 (17.2–22.9)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,522 13.5 1.0 (11.5–15.5)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 6,022 15.4 1.2 (13.1–17.7)
Wichita, Kansas 3,368 16.4 0.8 (14.9–17.9)
Wichita Falls, Texas 495 16.1 2.5 (11.3–21.0)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,661 17.5 1.4 (14.8–20.1)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,091 15.8 1.5 (12.8–18.8)
Median 15.7
Range 10.5–27.6

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Excluding diabetes during pregnancy or prediabetes or borderline diabetes in adults.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 27. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have a form of arthritis, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,915 30.5 0.6 (29.2–31.7)
Alaska 3,632 21.5 0.9 (19.7–23.3)
Arizona 7,881 21.6 0.5 (20.5–22.6)
Arkansas 5,199 27.1 0.9 (25.3–28.9)
California 12,531 18.3 0.4 (17.5–19.1)
Colorado 13,437 21.7 0.4 (20.9–22.6)
Connecticut 11,820 21.6 0.4 (20.7–22.4)
Delaware 4,045 24.7 0.8 (23.2–26.2)
District of Columbia 3,961 20.1 0.9 (18.4–21.8)
Florida 9,669 21.6 0.5 (20.7–22.6)
Georgia 4,654 23.5 0.7 (22.2–24.8)
Hawaii 7,137 17.2 0.5 (16.1–18.2)
Idaho 5,776 23.3 0.6 (22.1–24.6)
Illinois 5,276 21.6 0.6 (20.4–22.7)
Indiana 6,038 25.2 0.7 (23.9–26.6)
Iowa 6,194 23.1 0.6 (21.9–24.2)
Kansas 23,100 22.7 0.3 (22.1–23.3)
Kentucky 8,742 29.2 0.7 (27.8–30.7)
Louisiana 4,683 26.2 0.7 (24.8–27.6)
Maine 9,018 26.4 0.6 (25.2–27.6)
Maryland 12,517 21.6 0.6 (20.4–22.8)
Massachusetts 9,214 21.9 0.5 (20.9–22.9)
Michigan 8,885 26.9 0.5 (25.9–27.9)
Minnesota 16,665 19.7 0.3 (19.0–20.3)
Mississippi 6,005 26.5 0.7 (25.2–27.9)
Missouri 7,264 26.7 0.7 (25.3–28.0)
Montana 6,026 23.8 0.7 (22.4–25.2)
Nebraska 17,472 21.5 0.4 (20.7–22.3)
Nevada 2,903 20.1 1.0 (18.1–22.1)
New Hampshire 6,977 23.0 0.6 (21.8–24.2)
New Jersey 11,390 20.5 0.5 (19.6–21.5)
New Mexico 6,700 22.2 0.6 (21.0–23.5)
New York 12,278 21.5 0.4 (20.6–22.3)
North Carolina 6,667 24.7 0.6 (23.5–25.8)
North Dakota 4,939 21.6 0.6 (20.3–22.8)
Ohio 11,864 25.3 0.6 (24.2–26.4)
Oklahoma 6,879 25.7 0.6 (24.4–26.9)
Oregon 5,310 24.3 0.7 (23.0–25.6)
Pennsylvania 5,697 25.6 0.6 (24.4–26.9)
Rhode Island 6,159 24.2 0.7 (22.8–25.5)
South Carolina 11,532 26.2 0.5 (25.2–27.1)
South Dakota 7,168 21.8 0.7 (20.4–23.1)
Tennessee 5,931 29.4 0.8 (27.8–30.9)
Texas 14,596 19.8 0.5 (18.8–20.8)
Utah 11,332 20.8 0.4 (20.0–21.6)
Vermont 6,431 23.4 0.6 (22.3–24.6)
Virginia 8,602 21.6 0.5 (20.6–22.6)
Washington 15,960 22.5 0.4 (21.8–23.3)
West Virginia 5,923 33.6 0.7 (32.3–34.9)
Wisconsin 6,164 22.1 0.7 (20.8–23.4)
Wyoming 5,467 24.1 0.8 (22.5–25.7)
Guam 1,664 17.8 1.3 (15.3–20.3)
Puerto Rico 5,368 20.6 0.6 (19.5–21.7)
Median 22.7
Range 17.2–33.6

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia.

TABLE 28. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have a form of arthritis, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 577 23.3 1.8 (19.7–26.9)
Akron, Ohio 504 21.5 2.0 (17.6–25.3)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 928 22.6 1.6 (19.6–25.7)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,454 21.6 1.2 (19.3–23.9)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 818 27.9 2.4 (23.2–32.7)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,059 21.3 1.5 (18.4–24.2)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,030 20.7 0.9 (18.8–22.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 787 29.4 3.0 (23.6–35.2)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,870 16.3 1.1 (14.1–18.6)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,589 23.4 1.0 (21.4–25.3)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 641 25.3 1.8 (21.8–28.7)
Billings, Montana 679 22.7 1.8 (19.1–26.2)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,339 28.4 1.4 (25.7–31.1)
Bismarck, North Dakota 874 24.5 1.6 (21.3–27.7)
Boise City, Idaho 1,464 23.3 1.2 (20.9–25.7)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,458 19.6 0.9 (17.8–21.3)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 746 26.5 1.9 (22.9–30.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,776 21.9 1.1 (19.8–24.0)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,899 19.8 0.9 (18.1–21.5)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,571 24.8 1.4 (22.1–27.5)
Charleston, West Virginia 881 33.9 1.7 (30.6–37.2)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,578 23.6 1.2 (21.2–25.9)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,014 24.5 1.2 (22.2–26.9)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,678 20.4 0.7 (19.1–21.8)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,679 24.9 1.5 (22.1–27.8)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,598 24.5 1.2 (22.1–26.9)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,051 23.6 1.6 (20.4–26.8)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 551 18.2 3.6 (11.0–25.3)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,440 23.5 1.4 (20.8–26.2)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,244 27.2 1.4 (24.5–29.9)
Columbus, Ohio 1,797 25.2 1.2 (22.8–27.6)
Corpus Christi, Texas 561 24.4 2.4 (19.6–29.2)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,301 19.4 1.5 (16.4–22.4)
Dayton, Ohio 567 28.2 2.5 (23.3–33.1)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,907 21.5 0.7 (20.1–22.8)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,070 22.4 1.5 (19.5–25.3)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 960 23.5 1.8 (20.0–27.1)
El Paso, Texas 763 18.7 1.5 (15.7–21.7)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 992 18.7 1.2 (16.3–21.1)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 813 21.7 2.0 (17.8–25.7)
Florence, South Carolina 528 26.8 2.0 (22.8–30.8)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 606 20.2 1.9 (16.5–24.0)
Grand Island, Nebraska 774 22.2 1.8 (18.6–25.8)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 918 26.6 1.7 (23.2–29.9)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,494 24.0 1.2 (21.6–26.5)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 654 27.0 2.0 (23.1–31.0)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 781 28.9 3.2 (22.7–35.1)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,977 23.1 0.8 (21.6–24.6)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 623 22.2 2.1 (18.1–26.4)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,105 17.6 1.2 (15.3–20.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,229 32.3 1.5 (29.3–35.3)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 565 20.1 1.7 (16.8–23.5)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 2,001 23.9 1.2 (21.6–26.2)
Jackson, Mississippi 714 23.5 1.8 (20.0–26.9)
Jacksonville, Florida 670 23.2 1.7 (19.8–26.6)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,303 18.0 1.2 (15.6–20.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,676 23.9 0.8 (22.4–25.5)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 513 20.8 1.7 (17.5–24.0)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 515 30.0 3.1 (23.9–36.1)
Knoxville, Tennessee 572 32.5 2.6 (27.5–37.6)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,788 19.6 1.0 (17.7–21.5)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,136 25.4 1.8 (21.9–28.9)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 582 17.3 1.5 (14.3–20.3)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,988 16.9 0.8 (15.3–18.4)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,805 28.6 1.6 (25.4–31.7)
Manhattan, Kansas 699 20.9 1.6 (17.8–24.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,064 22.4 1.6 (19.3–25.5)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 2,085 19.3 1.0 (17.4–21.2)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,638 26.1 1.7 (22.9–29.4)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,651 18.3 0.4 (17.5–19.2)
Minot, North Dakota 516 21.5 2.3 (17.1–26.0)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 514 24.3 1.8 (20.7–27.9)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 1,015 27.5 1.7 (24.2–30.9)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,074 28.0 1.7 (24.6–31.4)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,469 20.7 1.2 (18.3–23.0)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,646 16.6 0.7 (15.2–18.1)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 968 23.1 1.4 (20.4–25.9)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,303 19.2 0.5 (18.2–20.1)
Norfolk, Nebraska 740 19.4 1.4 (16.7–22.2)
North Platte, Nebraska 655 23.3 1.6 (20.1–26.5)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 940 18.9 1.4 (16.1–21.7)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,070 23.7 0.9 (21.9–25.6)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,018 23.6 1.1 (21.4–25.9)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 4,008 22.6 0.8 (21.1–24.1)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 997 22.5 1.4 (19.7–25.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 792 24.6 1.6 (21.5–27.8)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,951 21.5 0.7 (20.1–22.8)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,265 26.9 1.3 (24.4–29.4)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,674 23.4 1.1 (21.3–25.6)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,200 22.8 0.9 (21.1–24.5)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 7,049 26.1 0.9 (24.3–27.8)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,775 17.9 0.9 (16.1–19.8)
Raleigh, North Carolina 684 20.2 1.6 (17.1–23.3)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,320 24.1 1.4 (21.4–26.8)
Reno, Nevada 928 20.1 1.7 (16.8–23.4)
Richmond, Virginia 1,370 22.6 1.2 (20.1–25.0)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,489 19.1 1.0 (17.0–21.1)
Rochester, Minnesota 685 20.8 1.5 (17.8–23.7)
Rochester, New York 775 24.6 1.7 (21.3–27.9)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,997 23.6 1.1 (21.4–25.9)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,031 21.0 1.3 (18.4–23.6)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 629 18.7 1.5 (15.8–21.5)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,223 25.1 1.2 (22.8–27.5)
Salina, Kansas 505 18.9 1.7 (15.5–22.3)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,057 29.8 2.3 (25.4–34.3)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,058 20.0 0.6 (18.8–21.3)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 776 21.1 1.4 (18.3–23.9)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 572 14.8 2.1 (10.7–18.8)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 651 12.3 1.4 (9.5–15.1)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,402 21.3 0.7 (19.8–22.7)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 671 25.2 1.9 (21.5–28.8)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,738 19.5 0.6 (18.4–20.6)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,309 16.2 1.1 (14.1–18.3)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 923 20.9 2.3 (16.4–25.5)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,335 20.5 1.4 (17.7–23.3)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 495 24.0 2.0 (20.1–28.0)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,533 26.6 1.4 (23.8–29.3)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,180 27.2 1.6 (24.0–30.4)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,532 22.4 1.2 (20.0–24.8)
Toledo, Ohio 726 25.7 1.9 (22.0–29.4)
Topeka, Kansas 2,127 24.7 1.0 (22.6–26.7)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,573 24.7 1.3 (22.2–27.1)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 568 30.7 2.1 (26.6–34.8)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,762 23.3 1.1 (21.2–25.4)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,094 25.4 1.0 (23.5–27.4)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,914 18.2 0.7 (16.8–19.6)
Wichita, Kansas 4,723 23.5 0.7 (22.2–24.8)
Wichita Falls, Texas 581 28.8 3.5 (21.9–35.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,256 23.1 1.1 (21.0–25.2)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,561 24.6 1.3 (22.0–27.2)
Median 23.2
Range 12.3–33.9

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus or fibromyalgia.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 29. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have a depressive disorder, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,905 22.0 0.7 (20.7–23.3)
Alaska 3,635 15.8 1.0 (13.8–17.8)
Arizona 7,896 18.4 0.7 (17.1–19.7)
Arkansas 5,224 23.6 1.1 (21.4–25.8)
California 12,533 12.8 0.4 (12.1–13.5)
Colorado 13,458 19.3 0.6 (18.2–20.4)
Connecticut 11,833 17.6 0.6 (16.5–18.7)
Delaware 4,044 17.9 1.0 (16.0–19.8)
District of Columbia 3,966 18.1 1.2 (15.8–20.4)
Florida 9,690 16.3 0.6 (15.1–17.5)
Georgia 4,654 18.2 0.8 (16.6–19.8)
Hawaii 7,137 11.7 0.6 (10.6–12.8)
Idaho 5,772 19.8 0.8 (18.2–21.4)
Illinois 5,280 15.4 0.7 (14.0–16.7)
Indiana 6,046 20.5 0.9 (18.8–22.2)
Iowa 6,207 19.5 0.7 (18.0–20.9)
Kansas 23,139 19.5 0.4 (18.8–20.2)
Kentucky 8,771 18.6 0.7 (17.1–20.0)
Louisiana 4,692 19.9 0.8 (18.4–21.5)
Maine 9,032 24.9 0.8 (23.3–26.5)
Maryland 12,534 16.3 0.7 (14.9–17.8)
Massachusetts 9,233 20.9 0.6 (19.7–22.1)
Michigan 8,891 19.7 0.6 (18.6–20.8)
Minnesota 16,703 19.0 0.4 (18.2–19.8)
Mississippi 6,008 18.1 0.8 (16.6–19.6)
Missouri 7,279 21.9 0.8 (20.4–23.4)
Montana 6,018 20.1 0.8 (18.5–21.8)
Nebraska 17,485 17.6 0.5 (16.7–18.6)
Nevada 2,908 16.6 1.1 (14.5–18.7)
New Hampshire 6,975 21.3 0.8 (19.6–22.9)
New Jersey 11,411 12.5 0.5 (11.6–13.5)
New Mexico 6,712 20.1 0.8 (18.6–21.7)
New York 12,300 15.7 0.5 (14.8–16.6)
North Carolina 6,673 18.6 0.6 (17.4–19.8)
North Dakota 4,948 19.0 0.8 (17.4–20.6)
Ohio 11,870 19.6 0.7 (18.3–21.0)
Oklahoma 6,914 22.6 0.8 (21.1–24.1)
Oregon 5,319 27.0 0.9 (25.3–28.7)
Pennsylvania 5,712 18.8 0.7 (17.4–20.3)
Rhode Island 6,166 21.6 0.9 (19.9–23.4)
South Carolina 11,529 19.2 0.6 (18.0–20.3)
South Dakota 7,188 16.3 0.8 (14.7–17.9)
Tennessee 5,947 21.1 0.8 (19.5–22.8)
Texas 14,624 15.9 0.6 (14.8–17.1)
Utah 11,350 20.8 0.5 (19.9–21.7)
Vermont 6,443 23.1 0.8 (21.6–24.6)
Virginia 8,613 15.7 0.5 (14.6–16.7)
Washington 15,983 21.7 0.5 (20.7–22.6)
West Virginia 5,929 23.4 0.7 (22.1–24.8)
Wisconsin 6,163 17.5 0.8 (16.0–19.0)
Wyoming 5,459 21.0 1.0 (19.1–22.9)
Guam 1,660 9.6 1.2 (7.3–11.9)
Puerto Rico 5,398 16.6 0.6 (15.4–17.8)
Median 19.0
Range 9.6–27.0

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including depression, major depression, dysthymia, or minor depression.

TABLE 30. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have a depressive disorder, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 575 13.8 2.0 (9.9–17.7)
Akron, Ohio 505 19.8 2.9 (14.2–25.4)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 929 19.8 2.2 (15.6–24.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,458 20.7 1.5 (17.9–23.6)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 814 17.0 2.8 (11.6–22.5)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,062 16.2 1.6 (13.0–19.4)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,032 14.5 1.0 (12.5–16.6)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 791 19.5 3.0 (13.6–25.3)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,873 15.0 1.2 (12.6–17.4)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,593 18.2 1.2 (15.8–20.5)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 642 16.3 1.8 (12.8–19.8)
Billings, Montana 678 21.0 2.2 (16.6–25.4)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,335 20.7 1.5 (17.8–23.6)
Bismarck, North Dakota 877 17.6 2.0 (13.7–21.4)
Boise City, Idaho 1,463 21.5 1.6 (18.4–24.6)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,469 18.7 1.0 (16.6–20.7)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 745 19.1 2.1 (15.0–23.3)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,778 22.3 1.4 (19.6–25.0)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,892 19.6 1.1 (17.5–21.7)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,571 16.8 1.5 (13.9–19.7)
Charleston, West Virginia 886 26.4 2.0 (22.6–30.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,574 17.9 1.3 (15.4–20.4)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,009 17.0 1.1 (14.8–19.3)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,681 14.7 0.8 (13.1–16.2)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,677 19.6 1.6 (16.5–22.6)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,601 21.9 1.7 (18.5–25.2)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,050 16.3 1.9 (12.6–20.0)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 553 22.9 4.5 (14.0–31.8)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,446 22.5 1.7 (19.1–25.9)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,247 20.6 1.6 (17.4–23.8)
Columbus, Ohio 1,801 22.0 1.6 (18.9–25.0)
Corpus Christi, Texas 567 18.3 2.8 (12.9–23.8)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,297 15.2 1.8 (11.7–18.8)
Dayton, Ohio 568 18.8 2.7 (13.5–24.2)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,900 19.0 0.8 (17.4–20.6)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,072 22.4 2.0 (18.5–26.2)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 963 24.0 2.1 (19.9–28.1)
El Paso, Texas 765 14.4 1.5 (11.4–17.4)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 992 19.5 1.6 (16.4–22.6)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 814 17.1 2.2 (12.8–21.4)
Florence, South Carolina 527 18.5 2.1 (14.4–22.6)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 604 19.2 2.4 (14.4–23.9)
Grand Island, Nebraska 775 20.5 2.2 (16.2–24.8)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 918 22.3 1.9 (18.7–26.0)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,495 19.2 1.4 (16.5–21.8)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 654 21.7 2.4 (16.9–26.5)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 784 23.1 3.7 (15.9–30.4)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,974 18.8 0.9 (17.0–20.7)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 623 15.9 2.3 (11.4–20.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,108 14.8 1.5 (11.8–17.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,230 24.9 1.7 (21.6–28.3)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 564 17.4 2.0 (13.5–21.3)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 2,005 21.4 1.4 (18.6–24.1)
Jackson, Mississippi 716 15.5 1.7 (12.1–18.9)
Jacksonville, Florida 673 17.9 2.3 (13.5–22.4)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,303 11.2 1.1 (9.0–13.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,687 19.0 0.8 (17.4–20.6)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 518 21.2 2.7 (15.9–26.4)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 518 22.6 3.3 (16.1–29.0)
Knoxville, Tennessee 575 22.1 2.6 (17.0–27.1)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,786 17.6 1.1 (15.3–19.8)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,140 22.7 2.2 (18.4–27.0)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 581 20.6 2.1 (16.6–24.7)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,983 9.9 0.6 (8.7–11.1)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,817 17.7 1.5 (14.7–20.7)
Manhattan, Kansas 701 16.4 1.7 (13.2–19.7)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,068 15.7 1.9 (12.0–19.3)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 2,086 15.8 1.3 (13.3–18.3)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,638 19.4 1.8 (15.9–22.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,662 18.8 0.6 (17.7–19.9)
Minot, North Dakota 519 21.6 3.1 (15.4–27.7)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 518 16.1 2.3 (11.7–20.6)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 1,016 22.4 2.2 (18.1–26.7)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,078 19.7 1.7 (16.3–23.1)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,475 12.5 1.2 (10.2–14.8)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,653 12.7 0.9 (10.9–14.5)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 972 21.1 1.7 (17.8–24.4)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,318 12.9 0.5 (11.9–13.9)
Norfolk, Nebraska 738 11.9 1.4 (9.3–14.6)
North Platte, Nebraska 652 20.4 2.2 (16.0–24.8)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 939 12.9 1.3 (10.3–15.5)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,073 22.5 1.1 (20.4–24.6)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,030 20.0 1.3 (17.4–22.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 4,016 18.6 0.9 (16.9–20.4)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 998 14.1 1.6 (11.0–17.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 794 21.6 2.0 (17.7–25.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,963 17.5 0.8 (16.0–19.0)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,269 19.2 1.5 (16.3–22.1)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,675 24.2 1.4 (21.4–27.0)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,198 24.6 1.0 (22.5–26.6)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 7,058 22.8 1.0 (20.8–24.8)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,775 19.2 1.0 (17.2–21.3)
Raleigh, North Carolina 684 14.9 1.6 (11.8–17.9)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,327 20.0 2.0 (16.1–23.8)
Reno, Nevada 935 16.7 1.8 (13.3–20.2)
Richmond, Virginia 1,371 15.5 1.2 (13.1–17.9)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,486 14.4 1.1 (12.3–16.6)
Rochester, Minnesota 689 16.4 1.6 (13.2–19.6)
Rochester, New York 782 23.1 2.2 (18.8–27.5)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,997 21.3 1.5 (18.3–24.3)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,030 14.7 1.3 (12.2–17.2)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 630 19.0 2.0 (15.0–23.0)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,226 19.6 1.3 (17.2–22.1)
Salina, Kansas 507 19.6 2.3 (15.1–24.0)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,057 22.4 2.7 (17.1–27.7)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,070 22.4 0.8 (20.9–24.0)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 777 14.9 1.7 (11.6–18.2)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 571 12.9 1.5 (10.0–15.8)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 649 10.4 1.3 (7.8–13.0)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,416 17.1 0.8 (15.5–18.6)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 672 21.7 2.2 (17.3–26.1)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,748 19.6 0.7 (18.2–21.0)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,309 16.7 1.6 (13.5–19.8)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 926 18.1 3.3 (11.7–24.5)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,338 16.9 1.8 (13.3–20.4)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 496 27.2 3.6 (20.1–34.3)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,535 23.4 1.7 (20.1–26.7)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,190 24.0 1.9 (20.4–27.7)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,536 17.5 1.5 (14.6–20.4)
Toledo, Ohio 728 21.6 2.5 (16.6–26.5)
Topeka, Kansas 2,127 24.7 1.3 (22.2–27.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,583 23.7 1.7 (20.5–27.0)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 571 23.3 2.4 (18.5–28.1)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,763 17.1 1.3 (14.7–19.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,104 16.0 1.0 (14.0–18.1)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,928 11.1 0.6 (9.9–12.3)
Wichita, Kansas 4,727 19.3 0.7 (17.8–20.7)
Wichita Falls, Texas 583 20.4 3.0 (14.5–26.3)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,258 19.4 1.4 (16.7–22.0)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,566 22.3 1.5 (19.4–25.1)
Median 19.2
Range 9.9–27.2

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including depression, major depression, dysthymia, or minor depression.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 31. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have high blood pressure, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 7,928 37.3 0.7 (35.9–38.7)
Alaska 3,645 28.0 1.0 (26.0–30.0)
Arizona 7,906 28.5 0.7 (27.2–29.8)
Arkansas 5,247 36.3 1.1 (34.1–38.5)
California 12,575 27.6 0.5 (26.6–28.5)
Colorado 13,480 24.8 0.5 (23.8–25.8)
Connecticut 11,843 27.0 0.5 (26.0–28.1)
Delaware 4,055 31.0 0.9 (29.2–32.8)
District of Columbia 3,983 31.1 1.2 (28.8–33.4)
Florida 9,691 29.2 0.6 (27.9–30.4)
Georgia 4,662 34.8 0.8 (33.2–36.4)
Hawaii 7,152 29.8 0.7 (28.3–31.2)
Idaho 5,782 29.3 0.8 (27.7–30.9)
Illinois 5,282 28.6 0.6 (27.4–29.9)
Indiana 6,045 29.9 0.8 (28.4–31.4)
Iowa 6,208 27.6 0.7 (26.3–28.9)
Kansas 23,179 29.5 0.3 (28.8–30.1)
Kentucky 8,787 36.0 0.8 (34.4–37.5)
Louisiana 4,708 37.3 0.8 (35.7–39.0)
Maine 9,041 29.0 0.6 (27.8–30.3)
Maryland 12,539 30.3 0.8 (28.8–31.8)
Massachusetts 9,263 27.1 0.6 (26.0–28.2)
Michigan 8,907 29.9 0.5 (28.8–30.9)
Minnesota 16,712 24.2 0.4 (23.4–24.9)
Mississippi 6,024 39.9 0.9 (38.2–41.6)
Missouri 7,281 31.3 0.7 (29.9–32.7)
Montana 6,034 25.7 0.7 (24.3–27.2)
Nebraska 17,515 27.7 0.5 (26.7–28.6)
Nevada 2,922 26.5 1.1 (24.3–28.7)
New Hampshire 6,997 25.7 0.7 (24.3–27.1)
New Jersey 11,433 28.0 0.6 (26.9–29.1)
New Mexico 6,719 27.5 0.7 (26.1–28.8)
New York 12,313 27.0 0.5 (26.1–27.9)
North Carolina 6,683 32.4 0.6 (31.2–33.6)
North Dakota 4,960 28.8 0.7 (27.4–30.2)
Ohio 11,886 31.1 0.6 (29.9–32.4)
Oklahoma 6,923 33.8 0.7 (32.4–35.2)
Oregon 5,335 27.3 0.7 (25.9–28.7)
Pennsylvania 5,725 28.9 0.7 (27.5–30.4)
Rhode Island 6,182 29.2 0.7 (27.8–30.7)
South Carolina 11,576 34.6 0.6 (33.5–35.7)
South Dakota 7,210 27.3 0.8 (25.7–28.8)
Tennessee 5,968 35.3 0.8 (33.7–37.0)
Texas 14,631 29.1 0.6 (27.9–30.2)
Utah 11,369 24.8 0.4 (24.0–25.7)
Vermont 6,472 25.6 0.6 (24.4–26.8)
Virginia 8,623 31.4 0.6 (30.2–32.6)
Washington 16,036 27.9 0.5 (27.0–28.8)
West Virginia 5,943 38.4 0.7 (37.0–39.8)
Wisconsin 6,169 26.7 0.7 (25.3–28.1)
Wyoming 5,472 27.9 0.9 (26.2–29.6)
Guam 1,669 31.7 1.6 (28.6–34.7)
Puerto Rico 5,399 39.4 0.7 (38.0–40.9)
Median 29.1
Range 24.2–39.9

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Excluding high blood pressure during pregnancy.

TABLE 32. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have high blood pressure, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 576 25.0 1.9 (21.3–28.8)
Akron, Ohio 506 32.1 2.8 (26.7–37.5)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 930 28.7 1.7 (25.4–32.1)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,460 26.0 1.3 (23.4–28.5)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 818 31.5 2.6 (26.4–36.7)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,063 27.7 1.6 (24.6–30.9)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,031 31.3 1.1 (29.1–33.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 790 34.1 2.4 (29.5–38.8)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,879 28.4 1.4 (25.6–31.2)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,594 31.6 1.2 (29.2–34.0)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 646 34.6 1.9 (30.8–38.3)
Billings, Montana 680 25.7 1.8 (22.2–29.2)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,342 35.3 1.6 (32.2–38.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 874 28.6 1.7 (25.2–32.0)
Boise City, Idaho 1,460 29.0 1.5 (26.1–32.0)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,475 27.5 1.1 (25.4–29.6)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 745 31.9 2.1 (27.8–35.9)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,791 23.3 1.0 (21.3–25.4)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,909 24.7 0.9 (22.9–26.4)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,573 29.3 1.5 (26.4–32.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 881 38.5 1.8 (35.0–42.1)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,578 30.1 1.3 (27.6–32.7)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,016 32.7 1.3 (30.1–35.2)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,681 28.2 0.8 (26.6–29.7)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,686 32.4 1.7 (29.1–35.7)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,611 28.2 1.7 (25.0–31.5)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,054 28.5 1.7 (25.2–31.7)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 553 32.6 3.2 (26.3–38.8)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,444 24.9 1.5 (22.0–27.8)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,250 35.4 1.7 (32.0–38.7)
Columbus, Ohio 1,807 31.4 1.5 (28.5–34.4)
Corpus Christi, Texas 564 30.0 2.4 (25.2–34.8)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,300 28.8 1.8 (25.2–32.3)
Dayton, Ohio 569 32.5 2.8 (27.1–37.9)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,914 25.5 0.8 (24.0–27.0)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,075 26.5 1.6 (23.4–29.7)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 965 24.4 1.8 (20.8–28.0)
El Paso, Texas 766 28.3 1.7 (25.0–31.5)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 994 27.2 1.5 (24.2–30.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 816 27.4 2.3 (22.8–31.9)
Florence, South Carolina 529 39.5 2.3 (35.0–43.9)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 606 28.7 2.6 (23.6–33.9)
Grand Island, Nebraska 778 28.4 1.9 (24.8–32.1)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 923 26.9 1.5 (23.9–29.9)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,498 33.3 1.5 (30.3–36.3)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 654 41.0 2.6 (35.9–46.1)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 786 33.1 3.4 (26.4–39.9)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,975 28.2 0.9 (26.5–29.9)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 624 33.6 2.5 (28.6–38.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 2,110 27.9 1.5 (25.0–30.9)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,235 39.7 1.7 (36.4–43.0)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 566 30.7 2.3 (26.2–35.3)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 2,003 28.9 1.2 (26.6–31.2)
Jackson, Mississippi 718 37.8 2.2 (33.5–42.2)
Jacksonville, Florida 671 32.5 2.1 (28.3–36.6)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,304 33.4 1.7 (30.1–36.8)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 7,698 28.5 0.8 (26.9–30.1)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 518 27.8 2.3 (23.3–32.3)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 518 37.2 3.4 (30.6–43.8)
Knoxville, Tennessee 576 35.2 2.4 (30.6–39.9)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,791 24.8 1.1 (22.6–27.0)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,141 35.9 2.2 (31.5–40.3)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 584 23.5 1.8 (20.1–27.0)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,998 27.1 1.0 (25.2–29.0)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,815 33.2 1.6 (30.0–36.4)
Manhattan, Kansas 700 24.1 1.7 (20.8–27.4)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,071 37.9 2.1 (33.8–42.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 2,082 27.4 1.3 (24.9–30.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,640 31.4 1.7 (28.0–34.8)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 8,677 23.8 0.5 (22.8–24.8)
Minot, North Dakota 522 28.3 2.2 (23.9–32.7)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 518 29.7 2.5 (24.8–34.6)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 1,020 31.8 1.9 (28.0–35.6)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,078 31.7 1.8 (28.1–35.2)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,477 24.9 1.2 (22.5–27.3)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,653 27.7 1.0 (25.7–29.6)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 975 32.5 1.7 (29.3–35.8)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 8,334 26.9 0.6 (25.8–28.0)
Norfolk, Nebraska 739 28.0 1.7 (24.7–31.4)
North Platte, Nebraska 655 27.6 1.8 (24.0–31.2)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 941 26.6 1.7 (23.2–30.0)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,079 26.4 0.9 (24.5–28.2)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,031 30.6 1.2 (28.2–33.0)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 4,017 29.5 0.9 (27.7–31.2)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 997 28.5 1.7 (25.1–31.9)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 800 31.3 1.8 (27.8–34.9)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,964 28.3 0.8 (26.7–29.8)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,268 29.1 1.4 (26.4–31.8)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,681 27.6 1.1 (25.5–29.8)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,216 25.7 0.9 (24.0–27.5)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 7,077 29.2 0.8 (27.5–30.8)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,773 22.5 1.1 (20.4–24.6)
Raleigh, North Carolina 682 29.1 1.8 (25.7–32.6)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,328 29.7 1.8 (26.2–33.2)
Reno, Nevada 936 30.9 2.1 (26.9–35.0)
Richmond, Virginia 1,372 32.7 1.4 (30.0–35.4)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,490 30.2 1.4 (27.6–32.9)
Rochester, Minnesota 687 19.7 1.4 (17.0–22.4)
Rochester, New York 780 24.4 1.7 (21.0–27.7)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 2,002 25.1 1.3 (22.5–27.7)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 1,032 29.0 1.6 (25.9–32.1)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 631 26.9 1.8 (23.4–30.4)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,230 30.8 1.2 (28.4–33.2)
Salina, Kansas 509 28.8 2.3 (24.3–33.4)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,056 34.1 2.2 (29.7–38.5)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,079 24.9 0.7 (23.5–26.3)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 777 26.7 1.7 (23.3–30.1)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 575 24.5 2.2 (20.1–28.9)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 656 21.4 1.6 (18.2–24.6)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,417 38.9 0.9 (37.0–40.7)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 674 30.2 1.9 (26.4–34.0)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 5,768 26.2 0.7 (24.9–27.5)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,308 22.8 1.2 (20.4–25.2)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 928 26.3 2.4 (21.6–31.0)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,346 25.4 1.6 (22.3–28.5)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 499 33.2 2.7 (28.0–38.4)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,538 28.4 1.5 (25.5–31.4)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,191 28.7 1.7 (25.3–32.1)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,539 29.3 1.5 (26.3–32.2)
Toledo, Ohio 729 28.8 1.8 (25.3–32.3)
Topeka, Kansas 2,133 33.0 1.1 (30.7–35.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,583 31.8 1.4 (29.2–34.5)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 572 37.5 2.2 (33.2–41.8)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,766 31.3 1.3 (28.8–33.9)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 2,107 28.6 1.1 (26.5–30.8)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,951 29.2 0.9 (27.4–31.0)
Wichita, Kansas 4,735 30.8 0.8 (29.3–32.3)
Wichita Falls, Texas 582 34.0 3.9 (26.4–41.6)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 2,262 30.4 1.1 (28.2–32.7)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,567 30.6 1.5 (27.7–33.5)
Median 29.0
Range 19.7–41.0

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Excluding high blood pressure during pregnancy.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 33. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have high blood cholesterol, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 6,818 36.4 0.8 (34.7–38.0)
Alaska 2,959 30.9 1.4 (28.3–33.6)
Arizona 6,958 32.6 0.8 (31.0–34.3)
Arkansas 4,612 35.6 1.3 (33.0–38.2)
California 10,078 31.1 0.6 (30.0–32.3)
Colorado 11,471 28.4 0.7 (27.1–29.7)
Connecticut 10,677 33.0 0.7 (31.6–34.4)
Delaware 3,569 34.2 1.3 (31.7–36.7)
District of Columbia 3,629 31.1 1.4 (28.5–33.8)
Florida 8,657 31.6 0.8 (30.1–33.1)
Georgia 4,053 32.6 1.0 (30.7–34.6)
Hawaii 5,863 31.8 0.9 (30.0–33.7)
Idaho 4,862 32.8 1.1 (30.7–34.9)
Illinois 4,582 31.7 0.9 (30.0–33.4)
Indiana 5,291 33.2 1.0 (31.3–35.1)
Iowa 5,332 30.6 0.9 (28.8–32.4)
Kansas 19,325 31.6 0.4 (30.8–32.4)
Kentucky 7,536 34.6 0.9 (32.8–36.4)
Louisiana 3,973 34.2 1.0 (32.3–36.1)
Maine 8,197 31.5 0.8 (29.9–33.0)
Maryland 11,528 32.4 1.0 (30.5–34.3)
Massachusetts 8,078 30.1 0.7 (28.8–31.5)
Michigan 7,715 32.3 0.7 (30.9–33.6)
Minnesota 14,273 28.1 0.5 (27.1–29.0)
Mississippi 5,199 33.6 0.9 (31.7–35.4)
Missouri 6,206 31.8 0.9 (30.1–33.6)
Montana 5,071 27.1 1.0 (25.2–29.0)
Nebraska 14,651 30.1 0.6 (28.9–31.3)
Nevada 2,485 32.5 1.6 (29.5–35.6)
New Hampshire 6,369 30.6 0.9 (28.8–32.3)
New Jersey 10,084 31.8 0.8 (30.2–33.3)
New Mexico 5,611 29.1 1.0 (27.2–31.1)
New York 10,780 32.5 0.6 (31.3–33.7)
North Carolina 5,712 31.9 0.7 (30.5–33.4)
North Dakota 4,230 29.5 0.9 (27.8–31.3)
Ohio 10,463 31.2 0.8 (29.7–32.8)
Oklahoma 6,008 32.9 0.9 (31.1–34.7)
Oregon 4,528 31.5 0.9 (29.8–33.3)
Pennsylvania 4,895 29.8 0.8 (28.1–31.4)
Rhode Island 5,561 30.1 0.9 (28.3–31.9)
South Carolina 10,144 32.9 0.6 (31.6–34.1)
South Dakota 6,048 27.4 0.9 (25.6–29.2)
Tennessee 5,268 34.9 1.0 (32.9–37.0)
Texas 12,362 32.7 0.8 (31.1–34.2)
Utah 8,866 30.0 0.6 (28.9–31.1)
Vermont 5,681 28.0 0.8 (26.4–29.6)
Virginia 7,571 31.9 0.8 (30.4–33.4)
Washington 13,747 31.0 0.6 (29.9–32.1)
West Virginia 5,172 33.7 0.8 (32.1–35.3)
Wisconsin 5,365 30.6 0.9 (28.8–32.4)
Wyoming 4,766 30.1 1.1 (28.0–32.2)
Guam 1,261 36.9 1.9 (33.1–40.7)
Puerto Rico 4,601 37.3 0.9 (35.5–39.1)
Median 31.8
Range 27.1–37.3

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.

TABLE 34. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥18 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they have high blood cholesterol, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 511 23.2 2.2 (19.0–27.5)
Akron, Ohio 435 27.9 3.2 (21.7–34.2)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 834 33.8 2.3 (29.3–38.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,249 29.4 1.8 (25.9–32.9)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 735 26.4 2.9 (20.7–32.0)
Anchorage, Alaska 881 33.3 2.2 (29.0–37.5)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,776 31.4 1.4 (28.6–34.2)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 685 34.4 2.8 (29.0–39.9)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,626 29.1 1.7 (25.8–32.4)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,227 33.6 1.5 (30.6–36.6)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 547 33.6 2.4 (28.9–38.2)
Billings, Montana 567 26.2 2.3 (21.6–30.7)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,144 34.5 1.8 (31.0–37.9)
Bismarck, North Dakota 767 29.7 2.2 (25.4–34.1)
Boise City, Idaho 1,255 34.0 1.9 (30.3–37.7)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 2,131 29.4 1.2 (27.0–31.8)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 676 32.0 2.6 (27.0–37.1)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,570 26.5 1.4 (23.8–29.1)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 2,545 29.8 1.3 (27.3–32.2)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,384 29.1 1.7 (25.7–32.4)
Charleston, West Virginia 778 36.5 2.2 (32.1–40.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,350 32.3 1.5 (29.4–35.3)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,768 32.5 1.5 (29.5–35.5)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,217 31.6 1.0 (29.5–33.6)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,488 33.1 1.9 (29.4–36.8)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,421 31.1 2.2 (26.7–35.5)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 921 27.0 2.0 (23.0–30.9)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 510 26.9 2.6 (21.8–31.9)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,255 29.8 1.9 (26.1–33.4)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,080 31.6 1.7 (28.2–35.0)
Columbus, Ohio 1,586 34.2 1.9 (30.5–37.9)
Corpus Christi, Texas 513 32.3 3.6 (25.1–39.4)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 1,118 35.6 2.9 (30.0–41.2)
Dayton, Ohio 500 29.2 2.7 (23.9–34.4)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 5,021 28.8 1.0 (26.9–30.7)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 944 29.5 1.9 (25.8–33.2)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 815 26.5 2.2 (22.2–30.8)
El Paso, Texas 606 30.5 2.4 (25.8–35.3)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 835 29.4 1.8 (25.9–33.0)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 708 30.8 2.8 (25.4–36.2)
Florence, South Carolina 446 31.6 2.6 (26.4–36.7)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 527 30.5 2.6 (25.4–35.6)
Grand Island, Nebraska 645 25.0 1.8 (21.4–28.6)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 796 30.2 2.2 (25.9–34.5)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,314 31.5 1.6 (28.3–34.7)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 553 31.3 2.7 (26.0–36.6)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 709 32.6 2.9 (26.9–38.2)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,603 32.9 1.1 (30.7–35.1)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 566 32.6 2.8 (27.2–38.1)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,835 33.1 1.9 (29.4–36.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,061 32.6 1.9 (28.8–36.4)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 470 31.2 2.6 (26.2–36.2)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,767 33.4 1.6 (30.4–36.5)
Jackson, Mississippi 619 35.4 2.5 (30.5–40.2)
Jacksonville, Florida 594 30.7 2.2 (26.3–35.1)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,117 42.0 2.3 (37.5–46.5)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 6,649 33.9 1.0 (31.9–36.0)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 428 34.3 3.1 (28.2–40.4)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 456 38.1 4.7 (28.8–47.4)
Knoxville, Tennessee 518 33.8 2.9 (28.2–39.4)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,477 30.9 1.5 (28.0–33.8)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,007 37.4 2.7 (32.0–42.7)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 423 27.8 2.2 (23.4–32.1)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 2,397 32.3 1.2 (29.9–34.7)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,580 31.1 2.0 (27.2–35.0)
Manhattan, Kansas 534 31.1 2.5 (26.2–36.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 940 33.1 2.3 (28.5–37.7)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,856 33.5 1.6 (30.5–36.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,477 31.8 1.9 (28.1–35.5)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 7,501 28.8 0.7 (27.4–30.1)
Minot, North Dakota 447 28.5 2.6 (23.5–33.5)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 452 28.7 2.4 (24.1–33.4)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 883 32.0 2.3 (27.5–36.5)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 935 30.9 2.3 (26.3–35.5)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,324 31.8 1.7 (28.5–35.1)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 3,224 31.4 1.5 (28.5–34.3)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 830 34.6 2.0 (30.6–38.5)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 7,205 33.2 0.8 (31.7–34.7)
Norfolk, Nebraska 613 30.9 2.2 (26.6–35.2)
North Platte, Nebraska 554 29.0 2.1 (24.9–33.1)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 770 31.8 2.4 (27.1–36.4)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,645 31.3 1.2 (28.9–33.8)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,792 32.4 1.6 (29.3–35.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,418 31.6 1.1 (29.5–33.7)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 882 30.6 2.2 (26.2–35.0)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 665 35.0 2.3 (30.6–39.5)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 4,404 33.3 1.0 (31.2–35.3)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,105 29.2 1.7 (25.9–32.5)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,466 32.0 1.5 (29.1–35.0)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,757 30.9 1.2 (28.6–33.3)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 6,365 30.2 1.0 (28.3–32.1)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,268 28.0 1.4 (25.3–30.7)
Raleigh, North Carolina 584 31.3 2.1 (27.2–35.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,127 29.2 2.2 (24.8–33.5)
Reno, Nevada 816 35.6 2.4 (30.9–40.3)
Richmond, Virginia 1,195 31.4 1.6 (28.3–34.6)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,198 33.5 1.6 (30.3–36.7)
Rochester, Minnesota 579 27.6 2.0 (23.7–31.6)
Rochester, New York 694 25.5 2.0 (21.5–29.5)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,825 31.3 1.6 (28.1–34.5)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 822 28.5 2.0 (24.5–32.5)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 519 29.1 2.1 (24.9–33.3)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,919 31.1 1.6 (28.0–34.2)
Salina, Kansas 408 34.0 2.9 (28.3–39.6)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,853 36.4 2.1 (32.2–40.6)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,287 30.1 0.9 (28.3–31.9)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 664 32.6 2.2 (28.3–36.9)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 453 24.8 3.0 (19.0–30.7)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 531 28.2 2.4 (23.5–32.8)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 2,918 37.4 1.1 (35.1–39.6)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 557 27.1 2.3 (22.6–31.7)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,957 30.2 0.9 (28.5–31.9)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 2,138 29.4 1.9 (25.6–33.2)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 775 27.0 2.7 (21.8–32.2)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,151 24.8 1.8 (21.3–28.2)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 444 33.7 3.3 (27.2–40.2)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,355 31.3 1.7 (27.9–34.7)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,028 30.5 1.9 (26.7–34.2)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,361 29.8 1.8 (26.3–33.2)
Toledo, Ohio 655 30.1 2.5 (25.2–35.0)
Topeka, Kansas 1,801 34.0 1.4 (31.2–36.8)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,376 31.7 1.7 (28.5–35.0)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 475 36.1 2.6 (31.0–41.2)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,570 32.7 1.6 (29.6–35.8)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,896 32.5 1.4 (29.8–35.2)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 7,189 30.9 1.1 (28.8–33.0)
Wichita, Kansas 3,973 31.7 0.8 (30.1–33.4)
Wichita Falls, Texas 511 42.0 4.9 (32.4–51.6)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,981 33.0 1.6 (29.9–36.2)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,389 34.9 1.8 (31.4–38.5)
Median 31.4
Range 23.2–42.0

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
§ Metropolitan division.

TABLE 35. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥45 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they had coronary heart disease, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 5,720 12.8 0.6 (11.7–13.9)
Alaska 2,476 8.8 1.0 (6.9–10.7)
Arizona 6,115 10.2 0.5 (9.2–11.2)
Arkansas 4,256 14.3 0.8 (12.6–15.9)
California 7,188 8.7 0.5 (7.8–9.6)
Colorado 9,557 8.2 0.4 (7.4–8.9)
Connecticut 9,082 9.0 0.4 (8.3–9.8)
Delaware 3,013 11.0 0.7 (9.6–12.5)
District of Columbia 3,143 8.8 0.9 (7.1–10.6)
Florida 7,571 11.2 0.5 (10.3–12.2)
Georgia 3,448 12.1 0.7 (10.7–13.5)
Hawaii 4,975 7.2 0.5 (6.2–8.3)
Idaho 4,233 9.3 0.6 (8.0–10.5)
Illinois 3,762 10.8 0.6 (9.6–12.1)
Indiana 4,665 12.9 0.6 (11.6–14.1)
Iowa 4,730 9.8 0.5 (8.8–10.7)
Kansas 16,390 10.1 0.3 (9.6–10.6)
Kentucky 6,483 15.4 0.7 (14.0–16.9)
Louisiana 3,385 13.1 0.7 (11.8–14.4)
Maine 7,131 11.6 0.6 (10.5–12.7)
Maryland 10,197 9.7 0.5 (8.8–10.7)
Massachusetts 6,277 10.1 0.6 (9.0–11.2)
Michigan 6,320 12.1 0.5 (11.1–13.1)
Minnesota 11,712 9.0 0.3 (8.4–9.6)
Mississippi 4,621 13.6 0.7 (12.2–15.0)
Missouri 5,415 12.5 0.6 (11.3–13.6)
Montana 4,605 8.9 0.5 (7.9–9.9)
Nebraska 12,588 9.7 0.4 (9.0–10.4)
Nevada 2,110 10.7 1.1 (8.6–12.8)
New Hampshire 5,674 9.4 0.5 (8.5–10.3)
New Jersey 8,255 9.5 0.5 (8.6–10.5)
New Mexico 5,052 9.3 0.6 (8.2–10.5)
New York 8,855 10.0 0.4 (9.2–10.8)
North Carolina 4,451 12.4 0.6 (11.2–13.5)
North Dakota 3,639 10.3 0.7 (9.0–11.7)
Ohio 9,363 11.5 0.5 (10.5–12.6)
Oklahoma 5,353 14.7 0.8 (13.2–16.2)
Oregon 3,884 9.1 0.5 (8.0–10.1)
Pennsylvania 4,003 11.4 0.7 (10.1–12.7)
Rhode Island 4,795 9.6 0.5 (8.6–10.7)
South Carolina 8,552 11.5 0.5 (10.6–12.4)
South Dakota 5,347 11.5 0.7 (10.1–12.9)
Tennessee 4,567 13.6 0.7 (12.2–14.9)
Texas 10,456 11.4 0.6 (10.2–12.6)
Utah 6,589 8.4 0.4 (7.5–9.2)
Vermont 4,784 10.1 0.6 (9.0–11.2)
Virginia 6,126 9.1 0.5 (8.2–10.0)
Washington 11,908 9.7 0.4 (9.0–10.4)
West Virginia 4,182 16.8 0.7 (15.5–18.1)
Wisconsin 4,462 9.7 0.6 (8.5–10.9)
Wyoming 4,400 10.5 0.6 (9.3–11.7)
Guam 815 11.0 1.7 (7.7–14.3)
Puerto Rico 3,631 14.3 0.7 (12.9–15.7)
Median 10.3
Range 7.2–16.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including heart attack (also known as myocardial infarction) and angina.

TABLE 36. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥45 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they had coronary heart disease, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
MMSA Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Aberdeen, South Dakota 444 12.5 1.9 (8.7–16.3)
Akron, Ohio 396 6.9 1.3 (4.4–9.4)
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York 718 9.4 1.3 (6.9–11.9)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 1,073 8.8 1.1 (6.6–11.0)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 643 11.4 2.1 (7.3–15.5)
Anchorage, Alaska 705 10.0 1.6 (6.9–13.1)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,436 10.1 0.9 (8.2–11.9)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 586 12.3 2.4 (7.5–17.0)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,327 7.8 1.1 (5.6–9.9)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 3,684 10.4 0.8 (8.8–11.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 435 12.4 1.8 (8.9–15.9)
Billings, Montana 505 9.0 1.3 (6.4–11.5)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 947 12.4 1.3 (9.9–14.8)
Bismarck, North Dakota 669 9.9 1.5 (7.0–12.8)
Boise City, Idaho 1,040 8.3 1.3 (5.8–10.7)
Boston, Massachusetts§ 1,595 10.6 1.1 (8.3–12.8)
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, New York 577 9.3 1.5 (6.3–12.3)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,234 9.7 1.1 (7.5–11.8)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts§ 1,969 8.7 0.9 (7.0–10.4)
Camden, New Jersey§ 1,092 10.4 1.4 (7.7–13.0)
Charleston, West Virginia 626 17.3 1.9 (13.6–20.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,092 7.7 1.0 (5.8–9.7)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,390 12.0 1.4 (9.3–14.7)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 2,560 11.1 0.8 (9.5–12.8)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,283 12.8 1.6 (9.6–16.0)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,273 11.0 1.2 (8.7–13.3)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 821 9.5 1.3 (7.0–12.0)
College Station-Bryan, Texas 437 8.4 2.4 (3.6–13.2)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,061 9.4 1.3 (6.9–11.8)
Columbia, South Carolina 837 12.0 1.6 (8.8–15.2)
Columbus, Ohio 1,323 12.1 1.4 (9.3–14.9)
Corpus Christi, Texas 468 11.0 2.5 (6.1–15.9)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas§ 950 12.0 2.2 (7.7–16.2)
Dayton, Ohio 441 9.9 1.4 (7.2–12.5)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 3,905 7.4 0.6 (6.3–8.5)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 799 7.7 1.0 (5.6–9.7)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 716 9.3 1.5 (6.4–12.2)
El Paso, Texas 516 9.0 1.6 (5.9–12.1)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 654 8.5 1.3 (5.9–11.1)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 640 12.1 2.1 (8.1–16.2)
Florence, South Carolina 369 12.7 2.2 (8.4–16.9)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas§ 443 13.2 2.9 (7.6–18.8)
Grand Island, Nebraska 566 9.9 1.5 (7.0–12.9)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 653 11.6 1.5 (8.7–14.6)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,087 12.1 1.2 (9.8–14.5)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 494 12.9 1.8 (9.4–16.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 636 16.5 3.2 (10.2–22.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 3,065 8.8 0.6 (7.6–10.0)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 499 10.5 2.1 (6.3–14.6)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,532 10.4 1.4 (7.6–13.1)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 861 17.7 1.6 (14.5–20.9)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 392 10.1 1.7 (6.8–13.3)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,494 10.8 1.0 (8.8–12.8)
Jackson, Mississippi 472 10.0 1.9 (6.3–13.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 495 12.3 2.0 (8.3–16.3)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 947 6.7 1.1 (4.6–8.8)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 5,491 10.9 0.7 (9.6–12.2)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 394 7.7 1.5 (4.7–10.7)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 419 16.4 2.5 (11.4–21.3)
Knoxville, Tennessee 443 15.3 2.5 (10.4–20.1)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,101 7.5 0.9 (5.6–9.3)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 904 12.8 1.8 (9.3–16.2)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 327 9.1 2.0 (5.1–13.0)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California 1,610 8.3 1.0 (6.4–10.2)
Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,456 15.4 1.7 (12.1–18.7)
Manhattan, Kansas 423 9.2 1.4 (6.4–12.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 825 11.1 1.6 (7.9–14.3)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,547 10.1 1.0 (8.1–12.2)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,236 8.6 1.1 (6.5–10.8)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 5,954 8.0 0.4 (7.2–8.8)
Minot, North Dakota 376 9.3 1.9 (5.7–13.0)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania§ 344 9.1 1.6 (5.9–12.3)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 770 13.9 1.6 (10.8–17.0)
Nashville-Davidson County-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 794 11.6 1.4 (8.9–14.2)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York§ 1,086 9.5 1.0 (7.6–11.5)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania§ 2,707 8.2 0.8 (6.6–9.7)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 659 11.5 1.3 (8.9–14.0)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey§ 5,536 9.9 0.5 (8.9–10.9)
Norfolk, Nebraska 492 10.1 1.6 (6.9–13.3)
North Platte, Nebraska 483 13.1 1.8 (9.5–16.6)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California§ 551 8.7 1.5 (5.7–11.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,147 8.8 1.0 (6.9–10.8)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,582 12.8 1.3 (10.3–15.3)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 2,802 10.1 0.7 (8.7–11.5)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 732 12.1 1.6 (8.9–15.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania§ 497 10.1 1.6 (7.1–13.2)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 3,754 10.2 0.6 (8.9–11.4)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 895 10.9 1.2 (8.5–13.3)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,153 10.2 0.9 (8.5–12.0)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,287 9.1 0.7 (7.7–10.5)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 5,433 9.7 0.7 (8.3–11.1)
Provo-Orem, Utah 807 5.8 0.9 (4.0–7.5)
Raleigh, North Carolina 370 12.3 1.9 (8.5–16.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,019 13.2 1.8 (9.6–16.7)
Reno, Nevada 704 9.5 1.5 (6.5–12.5)
Richmond, Virginia 930 9.8 1.2 (7.4–12.2)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 881 11.3 1.3 (8.8–13.8)
Rochester, Minnesota 462 7.4 1.2 (5.0–9.7)
Rochester, New York 613 8.4 1.3 (5.8–11.0)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire§ 1,611 10.2 0.9 (8.4–12.0)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 589 10.4 1.5 (7.5–13.3)
St. Cloud, Minnesota 396 8.7 1.7 (5.3–12.1)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,635 12.2 1.0 (10.2–14.2)
Salina, Kansas 359 8.1 1.5 (5.1–11.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,673 13.8 1.8 (10.2–17.3)
Salt Lake City, Utah 2,374 7.7 0.7 (6.4–9.0)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 508 9.3 1.4 (6.6–12.1)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California§ 278 NA NA NA
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 340 4.7 1.2 (2.4–7.0)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 2,305 14.2 0.9 (12.4–15.9)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 496 10.8 1.5 (7.9–13.6)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington§ 4,079 7.9 0.5 (6.9–8.9)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland§ 1,846 7.9 0.9 (6.1–9.8)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 723 9.5 2.7 (4.3–14.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 958 8.7 1.1 (6.5–10.9)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 368 12.5 2.3 (8.0–16.9)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,181 9.2 0.9 (7.3–11.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 833 15.3 2.0 (11.3–19.2)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 1,169 10.0 1.0 (7.9–12.0)
Toledo, Ohio 567 11.8 1.7 (8.5–15.0)
Topeka, Kansas 1,527 9.1 0.8 (7.5–10.7)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,211 15.8 1.7 (12.4–19.1)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 377 11.0 1.8 (7.5–14.4)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,278 8.8 1.0 (6.9–10.8)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan§ 1,511 10.3 1.0 (8.4–12.3)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia§ 5,964 6.9 0.6 (5.8–8.0)
Wichita, Kansas 3,345 10.1 0.6 (9.0–11.2)
Wichita Falls, Texas 489 17.8 2.7 (12.6–23.0)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey§ 1,637 9.9 0.9 (8.1–11.7)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,088 10.9 1.3 (8.4–13.4)
Median 10.1
Range 4.7–17.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; NA = not available; SE = standard error.
* Age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.
Including heart attack (also known as myocardial infarction) and angina.
§ Metropolitan division.
Estimate not available if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the relative standard error was >0.3.

TABLE 37. Age-adjusted* prevalence estimates of adults aged ≥45 years who have ever been told by a health professional that they had a stroke, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2015Return to your place in the text
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE (95% CI)
Alabama 5,784 7.2 0.5 (6.3–8.1)
Alaska 2,493 4.7 0.7 (3.3–6.1)
Arizona 6,152 4.9 0.4 (4.1–5.6)
Arkansas 4,324 6.4 0.7 (4.9–7.8)
California 7,208 4.0 0.3 (3.5–4.6)
Colorado 9,604 4.0 0.3 (3.5–4.6)
Connecticut 9,132 4.1 0.3 (3.5–4.6)
Delaware 3,046 5.8 0.5 (4.8–6.8)
District of Columbia 3,166 6.6 0.8 (5.1–8.1)
Florida 7,618 4.5 0.3 (4.0–5.1)
Georgia 3,478 6.1 0.6 (5.0–7.2)
Hawaii 5,002 4.4 0.4 (3.6–5.2)
Idaho 4,269 4.2 0.4 (3.4–5.1)
Illinois 3,766 5.2 0.5 (4.3–6.1)
Indiana 4,702 5.7 0.5 (4.8–6.6)
Iowa 4,766 3.8 0.3 (3.2–4.5)
Kansas 16,510 5.0 0.2 (4.6–5.4)
Kentucky 6,564 6.8 0.5 (5.8–7.8)
Louisiana 3,425 6.7 0.5 (5.7–7.7)
Maine 7,164 4.7 0.4 (4.0–5.5)
Maryland 10,273 5.0 0.5 (4.0–6.0)
Massachusetts 6,317 3.9 0.3 (3.2–4.5)
Michigan 6,361 5.3 0.4 (4.6–6.0)
Minnesota 11,753 3.6 0.2 (3.2–4.0)
Mississippi 4,672 7.5 0.5 (6.4–8.5)
Missouri 5,466 6.7 0.4 (5.8–7.5)
Montana 4,649 4.6 0.5 (3.6–5.5)
Nebraska 12,690 4.1 0.3 (3.6–4.6)
Nevada 2,128 3.7 0.6 (2.6–4.9)
New Hampshire 5,705 3.4 0.3 (2.9–4.0)
New Jersey 8,308 3.5 0.3 (2.9–4.0)
New Mexico 5,086 5.3 0.5 (4.3–6.3)
New York 8,910 3.7 0.3 (3.2–4.2)
North Carolina 4,478 6.3 0.5 (5.4–7.2)
North Dakota 3,670 4.5 0.4 (3.7–5.3)
Ohio 9,422 5.4 0.3 (4.8–6.1)
Oklahoma 5,391 6.4 0.5 (5.5–7.4)
Oregon 3,920 4.9 0.4 (4.1–5.8)
Pennsylvania 4,036 5.7 0.5 (4.7–6.8)
Rhode Island 4,810 3.9 0.4 (3.1–4.7)
South Carolina 8,645 5.9 0.