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Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high cholesterol.1 Too much cholesterol puts you at risk for heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death in the United States. High cholesterol has no signs or symptoms, so the only way to know if you have it is to get your cholesterol checked. Talk to your health care team about how you can manage your cholesterol levels and lower your risk.

Cholesterol in the arteries.

Learn More About High Cholesterol

Learn about “good” and “bad” cholesterol.

A Hispanic family.

Knowing Your Risk for High Cholesterol

Find out what increases your risk for high cholesterol.

A doctor speaking to a male patient.

Preventing and Managing High Cholesterol

Learn what you can do to lower your risk.

A group of four pharmacists.

Resources for Health Professionals

Find tools and resources to help your patients.

Featured Resources

Cholesterol Management Report

CDC Report on Cholesterol Management
A 2015 CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) studied the number of Americans who were on or eligible for cholesterol medicine, following the release of 2013 clinical guidelines. The report found that women were more likely than men to take cholesterol-lowering medication. Non-Hispanic whites were also more likely to take cholesterol-lowering medication than Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic blacks were.

Stroke Vital Signs

Vital Signs: Preventing Stroke Deaths
After decades of decline, progress has slowed in preventing stroke deaths. Almost 800,000 people have a stroke each year; more than 140,000 die, and many survivors face disability. This is disturbing because about 80% of strokes are preventable. Controlling your blood pressure, managing cholesterol and diabetes, and quitting smoking are important steps to reducing your risk. Learn more about how health systems can address stroke risk factors and improve the quality of stroke care to reduce stroke deaths.

Cholesterol Vital Signs

Vital Signs: High Blood Pressure and Cholesterol
The CDC Vital Signs program is a call to action each month concerning a single, important public health topic. CDC Vital Signs for February focuses on cardiovascular disease, specifically control of hypertension and cholesterol.

References

  1. Benjamin EJ, Blaha MJ, Chiuve SE, Cushman M, Das SR, Deo R, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2017 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2017;135:e1–e458.

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