Announcement: Click It or Ticket Campaign — May 23–June 5, 2016

Article Metrics
Altmetric:

Click It or Ticket is a national campaign coordinated annually by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to increase the proper use of seat belts. In 2014, more than 21,000 passenger vehicle occupants died in motor vehicle crashes in the United States; 49% were unrestrained at the time of the crash (1). An additional 2.4 million occupants (restrained and unrestrained) were treated in emergency departments for nonfatal crash-related injuries (2).

Using a seat belt is one of the most effective ways to prevent serious injury or death among older children, teens, and adults in the event of a crash. Research has found that when lap/shoulder seat belts are used, the risk for fatal injury is reduced by approximately half (3). Despite the effectiveness of seat belts, millions of persons in the United States continue to travel unrestrained (4).

Click It or Ticket takes place this year during May 23–June 5, 2016. Law enforcement agencies across the nation will conduct intensive, high-visibility enforcement of seat belt laws during both daytime and nighttime hours. Nighttime enforcement of seat belt laws is encouraged because seat belt use is lower at night (5). Additional information regarding the 2016 Click It or Ticket campaign activities is available from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration at http://www.nhtsa.gov/Driving+Safety/Occupant+Protectionexternal icon.

State-specific fact sheets on seat belt use and strategies to increase restraint use are available from CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/seatbelts/states.html. States can also calculate the expected number and monetized value of injuries prevented and lives saved by primary seat belt laws, as well as implementation costs, using CDC’s Motor Vehicle Prioritizing Interventions and Cost Calculator for States tool at http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/calculator/. Additional information on preventing motor vehicle crash-related injuries is available from CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety.


References

  1. National Center for Statistics and Analysis. Occupant protection in passenger vehicles: 2014 data. Traffic safety facts. Washington, DC: US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, National Center for Statistics and Analysis; 2016. Report no. DOT HS 812 262. http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812262.pdfpdf iconexternal icon
  2. CDC. WISQARS (Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System). Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars
  3. Kahane CJ. Fatality reduction by safety belts for front-seat occupants of cars and light trucks updated and expanded estimates based on 1986–99 FARS data. Washington, DC: US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; 2000. Report no. DOT HS 908 199.
  4. Shults RA, Beck LF. Self-reported seatbelt use, United States, 2002–2010: does prevalence vary by state and type of seatbelt law? J Safety Res 2012;43:417–20. CrossRefexternal icon PubMedexternal icon
  5. Tison J, Williams AF, Chaudhary NK. Daytime and nighttime seat belt use by fatally injured passenger vehicle occupants. Washington, DC: US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; 2010. Report no. DOT HS 811 281.

Suggested citation for this article: Announcement: Click It or Ticket Campaign — May 23–June 5, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:501. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6519a5external icon.

MMWR and Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report are service marks of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Use of trade names and commercial sources is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
References to non-CDC sites on the Internet are provided as a service to MMWR readers and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CDC is not responsible for the content of pages found at these sites. URL addresses listed in MMWR were current as of the date of publication.

All HTML versions of MMWR articles are generated from final proofs through an automated process. This conversion might result in character translation or format errors in the HTML version. Users are referred to the electronic PDF version (https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr) and/or the original MMWR paper copy for printable versions of official text, figures, and tables.

Questions or messages regarding errors in formatting should be addressed to mmwrq@cdc.gov.

View Page In:pdf icon
Page last reviewed: August 25, 2017