Disparities and Resilience among American Indian and Alaska Native People who are Pregnant or Postpartum

Although deaths related to pregnancy are rare, most are preventable. We lose too many American Indian and Alaska Native mothers each year from complications related to pregnancy.

American Indian and Alaska Native women are two times more likely to die of pregnancy-related causes than White women. This is unacceptable.

American Indian and Alaska Native people experience disparities in pregnancy-related death and other maternal health conditions. Ongoing and historical trauma due to colonization, genocide, forced migration, and cultural erasure contribute to health inequities. Due to ongoing and historical trauma, American Indian and Alaska Native people are more likely to have underlying chronic health conditions and experience sexual or interpersonal violence. American Indian and Alaska Native people often experience discrimination or racism and face systemic barriers to care including higher rates of poverty and long distance to quality health care services.

Despite these challenges, American Indian and Alaska Native people continue to be resilient and thrive.

Many American Alaska Native people draw strength from culture and tradition. Their resilience is built through culture, spirituality, shared values, and a strong sense of identity. Culture serves as a protective factor in the health and well being of American Indian and Alaska Native people.

We honor the lives of those who have passed on, and work to prevent future losses.

Mona
Vanessa
American Indian Beading