What CDC is Doing in Global Hepatitis B Vaccination

Key points

CDC works with partners and countries around the world to make progress towards eliminating hepatitis B. According to the World Health Organization, a country has eliminated hepatitis B when the new cases decrease by 90% deaths decreases by 65%, compared to these rates in 2015.

Increasing vaccination at birth

A mother holds her baby while a health care worker speaks to her.
A healthcare worker speaks to a mother in Angola about the vaccinations her newborn will receive. The hepatitis B vaccine is now provided for free to all newborns in Angola. ©UNICEF/U.S.CDC/UN0828232/Prinsloo

CDC helps countries prevent the primary source of chronic hepatitis B.‎

The primary source of chronic HBV infection is the spread from mother to infant at the time of birth. This can be prevented with the first dose of hepatitis B vaccine given with 24 hours of birth (known as the "birth dose"), followed by two additional doses.

CDC's focus

Supporting introduction of hepatitis B birth dose vaccination

Vaccine introduction happens when a country incorporates a new vaccine into its immunization schedules. CDC supports hepatitis B birth dose introduction into routine vaccination schedules by:

  • Contributing to guidelines on introducing hepatitis B birth doses into immunization schedules
  • Compiling evidence on the burden of hepatitis B infectionA among pregnant women and estimate the risk of mother-to-child transmission in African countries without a hepatitis B birth dose
  • Helping to assess the cost of introducing hepatitis B birth dose vaccines
  • Participating in assessments of hepatitis B birth dose vaccination in countries that have recently introduced to help them improve program performance

Improving coverage of hepatitis B vaccine birth dose

  • Implementing and evaluating interventions to improve timely hepatitis B vaccine access and demandB at birth
  • Evaluating best practices for using hepatitis B birth dose vaccine in a controlled temperature chainC
  • Evaluating and improving hepatitis B birth dose vaccine implementation in children born in health facilities and those born outside of health facilities

Supporting disease elimination

CDC helps innovate ways to test for and prevent hepatitis B.‎

CDC is researching new and improved diagnostics for hepatitis B. CDC also looks for innovative ways to deliver hepatitis B vaccines.

CDC's focus

  • Evaluating point-of-care tests for hepatitis B (which don't need to be sent to a laboratory)
  • Finding ways to diagnose hepatitis B at the same time as other diseases
  • Evaluating microneedle patches as a potential way to give hepatitis B vaccines

Promoting new laboratory tests and other innovations

CDC helps innovate ways to test for and prevent hepatitis B.‎

CDC is researching new and improved diagnostics for hepatitis B. CDC also looks for innovative ways to deliver hepatitis B vaccines.

CDC is currently focused on evaluating new methods for hepatitis B testing that can be combined with tests for other vaccine-preventable diseases.

Resources and references

Further reading‎

Learn about the World Health Organization's goal of eliminating hepatitis B.
Content Source:
Global Immunization
  1. "Burden of disease" refers to how much a disease costs an individual and society (in health, monetary, and other costs).
  2. "Demand" refers to how much a population wants a certain vaccination.
  3. "Controlled temperature chain" refers to a process for keeping vaccines above the recommended long-term storage temperature for a limited period of time. Source: World Health Organization