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Videos About Breast Cancer

The list below shows videos about breast cancer that have been posted on CDC’s YouTube channel.

Photo of Dr. Temeika Fairley

Why Do Black Women Have a Higher Risk of Breast Cancer At a Young Age?

CDC’s Dr. Temeika Fairley explains what she wants young black women to know about their risk of breast cancer.

Photo of Dr. Lisa Richardson

What Would You Tell Your Patients About Drinking Alcohol and Breast Cancer Risk?

CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson explains the link between drinking alcoholic beverages and breast cancer risk, and what you can do to lower your risk.

Photo of Dr. Lisa Richardson

Why Does Breastfeeding Lower Your Risk of Breast Cancer?

CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson explains why breastfeeding your babies can lower your risk of breast cancer.

Photo of Dr. Temeika Fairley

What Should I Know About My Family History of Breast Cancer?

CDC’s Dr. Temeika Fairley explains how a family history of breast cancer can raise your risk, and how to start the conversation about family health history.

Photo of Dr. Lisa Richardson

When Should I Start Getting Mammograms?

CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson talks about the best time for women to start getting mammograms to screen for breast cancer.

Photo of Dr. Temeika Fairley

How Can I Reduce My Risk of Breast Cancer?

You can make healthy choices to help lower your breast cancer risk. CDC’s Dr. Temeika Fairley explains.

Photo of Dr. Temeika Fairley

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Breast Cancer?

There are several signs and symptoms of breast cancer, including some you may not know about. CDC’s Dr. Temeika Fairley explains.

Photo of Emily and Caroline with an umbrella.

Emily & Caroline – Do What Works Best For You

When Emily and Caroline found out their mom had a BRCA gene mutation, they decided to get tested themselves. From there, they took different paths. Find out how these sisters and their mom support each other, and how one size doesn’t always fit all when managing your breast cancer risk.

Photo of Emily and Caroline with their mother.

Emily & Caroline – Two Different Paths

Breast cancer doesn’t just affect the person diagnosed, it can affect the entire family. For sisters Emily and Caroline, that means managing their risks of breast cancer in individual ways, but coming together to support each other on their paths.

Photo of Charity.

No Matter Your Age, Know Your Breast Cancer Risk

At age 27 Charity was diagnosed with breast cancer. Find out how she took a proactive approach to her health—and what she wants other young women to know about their breast cancer risks.

Your Health with Joan Lunden and CDC

Breast Cancer Treatment Plan

Joan Lunden encourages breast cancer patients to work with their doctors to determine the right treatment plan.

Your Health with Joan Lunden and CDC

Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

Joan Lunden discusses how chemotherapy was the best treatment plan for her breast cancer.

Carletta swimming

Carletta: My Own Best Advocate

Carletta, age 44, talks about how knowing her family history of breast cancer made it easier for her to be proactive about talking to her doctor when she noticed changes in her body. Carletta was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 41, and she finished her first triathlon one year after her first chemotherapy treatment.

Carletta bicycling

Carletta: Motivated by Breast Cancer

Carletta was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 41. Now cancer-free, she is motivated by her ability to do the things that she couldn’t do during treatment. She finished her first triathlon one year after her first round of chemotherapy.

Carletta playing tennis

Carletta’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Carletta never met her grandmother, who died from breast cancer at the age of 44. Carletta’s family history inspired her to understand her own risk. She encourages young women with a family history of cancer to learn their risk for breast cancer.

Marleah

Marleah: Inspired by My Mom

When Marleah was 8 years old, she watched her mother, then 38, go through treatment for breast cancer. Her mother’s experience inspired her to understand and her own risk, and she learned that she has a BRCA2 gene mutation like her mom and aunt. To manage her risk, Marleah currently undergoes surveillance.

Marleah smiling

Marleah: Understanding My Risk to Help Others

Marleah’s family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where she can be an advocate for herself and others at high risk. At 27, Marleah explains that understanding her risk has been an emotional journey, but also a good journey.

Marleah climbing

Marleah’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Marleah took steps to understand her risk for breast cancer because of her family history. She encourages young women with a family history of cancer to learn their personal risk.

Cara: My Breast Cancer Journey

Cara: My Breast Cancer Journey

Cara, age 30, discusses how her family history of breast cancer and Ashkenazi Jewish heritage inspired her proactive approach to her breast health, allowing her to find her breast cancer early when she was diagnosed at age 25.

Cara: Making Decisions with a Genetic Counselor

Cara: Making Decisions with a Genetic Counselor

Cara’s father encouraged her to get genetic counseling because of her family history of cancer and Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Cara explains how a genetic counselor helped her understand her personal risk for breast cancer.

Cara’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Cara’s Bring Your Brave Ad

When Cara was three years old, her mom passed away from breast cancer at the age of 42. Cara encourages young women with a family history of cancer and Ashkenazi Jewish heritage to learn their risk for breast cancer.

Jackie: Taking Action for My Daughter

Jackie: Taking Action for My Daughter

Jackie, age 38, has a paternal family history of breast and ovarian cancer and a BRCA gene mutation. She shares how understanding her risk enabled her to take action to reduce her risk for breast and ovarian cancer, and create a roadmap for a bright future for her and her 4-year-old daughter.

Jackie: Testing for a BRCA Gene Mutation

Jackie: Testing for a BRCA Gene Mutation

Jackie saw many relatives on her father’s side of the family get diagnosed with and die from breast or ovarian cancer. Because of her family history, her doctor recommended she receive genetic counseling. Jackie explains her experience with genetic counseling and testing.

Jackie’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Jackie’s Bring Your Brave Ad

Jackie took steps to learn about her risk for breast and ovarian cancer because of her family history.

What Is a BRCA Gene Mutation?

What Is a BRCA Gene Mutation?

In this video, genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains what the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are and how a mutation in either gene can lead to cancer.

Lisa: Empower Yourself by Learning Your Family’s Cancer History

Lisa: Empower Yourself by Learning Your Family’s Cancer History

Lisa’s family history of breast and ovarian cancer puts her at higher risk for getting cancer in the future. Watch this video to learn how she’s used this information to empower herself.

Lisa: Start the Conversation About Family History of Breast Cancer

Lisa: Start the Conversation About Family History of Breast Cancer

Lisa talks about how she realized that having family members with pre-menopausal breast and ovarian cancer meant that she has a higher risk of getting cancer before she turned 45.

Lisa: Be Your Own Health Advocate

Lisa: Be Your Own Health Advocate

Lisa, age 41, talks about her decision to get genetic counseling and testing to find out if she had a BRCA gene mutation, and how the experience empowered her to understand her options and be her own best health advocate.

Lisa: My Experience with BRCA Counseling and Testing

Lisa: My Experience with BRCA Counseling and Testing

Lisa, age 41, talks about how her family history led her to get genetic counseling and testing for BRCA gene mutations.

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer (30 seconds)

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains that if you have a family history of breast cancer, it is important to speak with a genetic counselor or a health professional who can talk to you about your personal risk of developing breast cancer.

BRCA Genes and Breast Cancer

BRCA Genes and Breast Cancer

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, provides an overview of BRCA genes and their relationship to breast and ovarian cancer.

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer

The Role of Family History in Breast Cancer

Genetic counselor Joyce Turner, MSC, CGC, explains how family history of breast cancer may indicate inherited changes in genes that increase your personal risk for breast cancer.

Do You Know: BRCA? Video Infographic

Do You Know: BRCA?

This brief infographic video will help you learn more information about BRCA genes, BRCA gene mutations, and how they are related hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in young women.

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