Vaccines at 7 to 11 Months

Seven month infants

Protect your baby against 14 potentially serious diseases before 2 years old with vaccines.

What vaccines will my baby get?

At 7-11 months of age, your baby should receive the flu vaccine to protect your baby from the following disease:

After vaccination

Sometimes children have mild reactions from vaccines, such as pain at the injection site, a rash, or a fever. These reactions are normal and will soon go away.

  • Read the Vaccine Information Sheet(s) your child’s doctor gave you to learn about side effects your child may experience.
  • Offer breastmilk and liquids more often. It is normal for some children to eat less during the 24 hours after getting vaccines.
  • Pay extra attention to your child for a few days. If you see something that concerns you, call your child’s doctor.
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Treat mild reactions from vaccines:

  • Use a cool, damp cloth to help reduce redness, soreness, and/or swelling at the injection site.
  • Reduce fever with a cool sponge bath.
  • Ask your child’s doctor if you can give your child a non-aspirin pain reliever.

Important developmental milestones

Get tips to prepare for your baby’s well child visits.

At 9 months, your baby is due for general developmental screening. Ask your child’s doctor about it.

At 9 months, most babies*:

  • Make a lot of different sounds  like “mamamama” and “bababababa”
  • Understand “no”
  • Watch the path of something as it falls
  • Sit without support
  • Stand, holding on to an object
    *This is not an exhaustive list. See more milestones.
Record your baby’s vaccines, weight, height, and developmental milestones.

Well-child visits tracker

Record your baby’s vaccines, weight, height, and developmental milestones.

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Are you planning to travel?

Many vaccine-preventable diseases that have become rare in the United States, such as measles, are still common in other parts of the world. No matter where you plan to go, you should get recommended vaccines to lower your chances for getting and spreading disease.

Infants 6 months to 11 months should have 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before traveling to another country.

Following the vaccine schedule

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend children receive all vaccines according to the recommended vaccine schedule.

Page last reviewed: May 10, 2019