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CDC Pediatric mTBI Guideline

Take Action to Improve the Care of Children with mTBI

The goal of the CDC Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) Guideline is to help healthcare providers take action to improve the health of their patients. The CDC Pediatric mTBI Guideline consists of 19 sets of clinical recommendations that cover diagnosis, prognosis, and management and treatment. These recommendations are for healthcare providers working in: inpatient, emergency, primary, and outpatient care settings.

The CDC Pediatric mTBI Guideline was developed through a rigorous process guided by the American Academy of Neurology and 2010 National Academy of Sciences methodologies. An extensive review of scientific literature, spanning 25 years of research, formed the basis of the Guideline.

Key Recommendations from the CDC Pediatric mTBI Guideline:

  1. Do not routinely image patients to diagnose mTBI.
  2. Use validated, age-appropriate symptom scales to diagnose mTBI.
  3. Assess evidence-based risk factors for prolonged recovery.
  4. Provide patients with instructions on return to activity customized to their symptoms.
  5. Counsel patients to return gradually to non-sports activities after no more than 2-3 days of rest.

Download tools to help you use the CDC Pediatric mTBI Guideline recommendations in your practice.

Checklist on Diagnosis and Management

Acute Concussion Evaluation (ACE) Forms

The ACE (Acute Concussion Evaluation) forms are patient assessment tools.

Download

Emergency Department ACE form

Physician/Clinician office ACE form

At A Glance: Diagnosis

At A Glance: Prognosis

At A Glance: Treatment

Letter to schools to be filled in by healthcare providers

Discharge Instructions

Symptom-based Recovery Tips

To learn more about concussion, such as the signs and symptoms and how to safely return to school and sports after a concussion, check out the CDC HEADS UP website.

 

Connect with the CDC Injury Center

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