2017 State and City TB Report

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Incidence [3]

Elimination of TB is defined as reducing TB disease incidence in the United States to less than 1 case per million persons per year. Therefore, measuring the number of new cases occurring each year remains the best overall indicator of progress toward TB elimination. In 2017, overall TB incidence in the United States was 2.8 TB cases (including U.S.-born and non-U.S.–born persons) per 100,000 persons (28 per million). Overall, TB incidence slightly declined from 2016 to 2017; however, the nation has not yet achieved the 2020 national target of <1.4 TB cases per 100,000 (Figure 1 and Figure 2).

 

This map shows states and cities color coded into one of 3 categories based on TB incidence: those that were at or below the 2020 target of 1.4 TB cases/100,000 persons (Montana, Wyoming, Vermont, Idaho, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Utah, Kansas, Pennsylvania, Maine, Nebraska, Rhode Island, Ohio, Michigan, Oklahoma, New Hampshire, and Missouri), those that were above the 2020 target of 1.4, but were at or below the national average of 2.8 (Kentucky, Iowa, Colorado, Indiana, Delaware, South Dakota, Oregon, New York, Connecticut, New Mexico, Mississippi, North Dakota, Tennessee, South Carolina, Illinois, North Carolina, Virginia, Alabama, Florida, Nevada, Arizona, Washington, Georgia, and  Arkansas) and those that were above the national average of 2.8 (Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Minnesota, Maryland, Texas, Baltimore, Chicago, California, Philadelphia, District of Columbia, Los Angeles, San Diego, New York City, Alaska, Houston, Hawaii, and San Francisco).

 

This horizontal bar graph shows individual state and city TB incidence per 100,000 persons.  States and cities are categorized into 3 groups based on numbers of TB cases reported in 2017.  Within each group states and cities are ordered by increasing incidence and color coded by whether or not they met the 2020 national target (1.4), were between the 2020 target and national average (2.8), or had incidence above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 1-53 TB cases in 2017, incidences ranged from 0.3 in Wyoming to 7.2 in Alaska.  Montana, Wyoming, Vermont, Idaho, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Utah, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire had incidences at or below the 2020 target; Iowa, Delaware, South Dakota, New Mexico, Mississippi, North Dakota had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Baltimore, the District of Columbia, and Alaska had incidences that were above the national average.   Among states/cities that reported 54-140 TB cases in 2017, incidences ranged from 1.0 in Pennsylvania to 12.1 in San Francisco.  Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Oklahoma, and Missouri had incidences at or below the 2020 target; Kentucky, Colorado, Indiana, Oregon, Connecticut, Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, Nevada, and Arkansas had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Louisiana, Chicago, Philadelphia, Hawaii, and San Francisco had incidences that were above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 41 or more TB cases in 2017, incidence ranged from 1.3 in Ohio to 8.1 in Houston.  Ohio had an incidence at or below the 2020 target; New York, Illinois, North Carolina, Virginia, Florida, Arizona, Washington, and Georgia had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Massachusetts, New Jersey, Minnesota, Maryland, Texas, California, Los Angeles, San Diego, New York City, and Houston had incidences that were above the national average.

 

This map shows states and cities color coded into one of 3 categories based on TB incidence among U.S.-born persons: those that were at or below the 2020 target of 0.4 TB cases/100,000 U.S.-born persons (Rhode Island, Idaho, Maine, Vermont, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Utah, Iowa, Montana, New York, Pennsylvania, Kansas, New Mexico, Connecticut, Ohio, Colorado, and Indiana), those that were above the 2020 target of 0.4, but were at or below the national average of 1.0 (New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Virginia, West Virginia, Oregon, Michigan, Minnesota, Illinois, Washington, Missouri, Nevada, Maryland, New Jersey, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Arizona, South Dakota, North Dakota, North Carolina, and Delaware) and those that were above the national average of 1.0 (Tennessee, California, Los Angeles, Florida, Hawaii, San Francisco, South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, New York City, Texas, Philadelphia, Arkansas, Chicago, Louisiana, District of Columbia, Alabama, Baltimore, San Diego, Houston, and Alaska).  Wyoming did not report any TB cases among U.S.-born persons.

 

This horizontal bar graph shows individual state and city TB incidence per 100,000 U.S.-born persons.  States and cities are categorized into 3 groups based on numbers of TB cases reported in 2017.  Within each group states and cities are ordered by increasing incidence and color coded by whether or not they met the 2020 national target (0.4), were between the 2020 target and national average (1.0), or had incidence above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 1-53 TB cases in 2017, incidence among U.S.-born persons ranged from 0.1 in Rhode Island to 5.6 in Alaska.  Rhode Island, Idaho, Maine, Vermont, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Utah, Iowa, Montana, Kansas, and New Mexico had incidences at or below the 2020 target; New Hampshire, West Virginia, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Delaware had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Mississippi, District of Columbia, Baltimore, and Alaska had incidences that were above the national average.   Among states/cities that reported 54-140 TB cases in 2017, incidence among U.S.-born persons ranged from 0.3 in Pennsylvania to 2.0 in Alabama.  Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Colorado, and Indiana had incidences at or below the 2020 target; Oregon, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Hawaii, and San Francisco had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; South Carolina, Philadelphia, Arkansas, Chicago, and Alabama had incidences that were above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 141 or more TB cases in 2017, incidence among U.S.-born persons ranged from 0.3 in New York to 4.0 in Houston.  New York and Ohio had incidences at or below the 2020 target; Massachusetts, Virginia, Minnesota, Illinois, Washington, Maryland, New Jersey, Arizona, and North Carolina had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; California, Los Angeles, Florida, Georgia, New York City, Texas, Louisiana, San Diego, and Houston had incidences that were above the national average.

 

This map shows states and cities color coded into one of 3 categories based on TB incidence among non-U.S.–born persons: those that were at or below the 2020 target of 11.1 TB cases/100,000 non-U.S.–born persons (Delaware, Vermont, Florida, Utah, Idaho, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Wyoming, Kansas, Nevada, and Oklahoma), those that were above the 2020 target of 11.1, but were at or below the national average of 14.4 (New Jersey, Colorado, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, Illinois, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Los Angeles, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, Arizona, North Carolina, and Chicago) and those that were above the national average of 14.4 (Georgia, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Washington, California, Massachusetts, Virginia, New York City, Maryland, Tennessee, Missouri, Houston, Kentucky, South Dakota, Ohio, Indiana, North Dakota, Philadelphia, Arkansas, San Diego, District of Columbia, Baltimore, West Virginia, Iowa, Maine, Alaska, Louisiana, Minnesota, San Francisco, and Hawaii).  Montana did not report any TB cases among non-U.S.–born persons.

 

This horizontal bar graph shows individual state and city TB incidence per 100,000 non-U.S.–born persons.  States and cities are categorized into 3 groups based on numbers of TB cases reported in 2017.  Within each group states and cities are ordered by increasing incidence and color coded by whether or not they met the 2020 national target (11.1), were between the 2020 target and national average (14.4), or had incidence above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 1-53 TB cases in 2017, incidence among non-U.S.–born persons ranged from 6.4 in Delaware to 26.5 in Alaska.  Delaware, Vermont, Utah, Idaho, Rhode Island, Wyoming, and Kansas had incidences at or below the 2020 target; Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Mississippi had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; New Hampshire, New Mexico, South Dakota, North Dakota, District of Columbia, Baltimore, West Virginia, Iowa, Maine, and Alaska had incidences that were above the national average.   Among states/cities that reported 54-140 TB cases in 2017, incidences among non-U.S.–born persons ranged from 9.7 in Connecticut to 38.6 in Hawaii.  Connecticut, Nevada, and Oklahoma had incidences at or below the 2020 target; Colorado, Michigan, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Alabama had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Chicago, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky, Indiana, Philadelphia, Arkansas, Louisiana, San Francisco, and Hawaii had incidences that were above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 141 or more TB cases in 2017, incidence among non-U.S.–born persons ranged from 7.4 in Florida to 30.5 in Minnesota.  Florida had an incidence at or below the 2020 target; New Jersey, New York, Illinois, Los Angeles, Texas, Arizona, and North Carolina had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Georgia, Washington, California, Massachusetts, Virginia, New York City, Maryland, Houston, Ohio, San

 

This map shows states and cities color coded into one of 3 categories based on TB incidence among U.S.-born non-Hispanic black or African American persons: those that were at or below the 2020 target of 1.5 TB cases/100,000 U.S.-born non-Hispanic black or African American persons (Indiana, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Connecticut, Arizona, Kentucky, Nevada, Kansas, Ohio, New York, West Virginia, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Michigan), those that were above the 2020 target of 1.5, but were at or below the national average of 2.8 (New Jersey, Colorado, Oregon, Oklahoma, Missouri, North Carolina, Massachusetts, California, Philadelphia, and New York City), and those that were above the national average of 2.8 (Louisiana, Washington, Baltimore, New Mexico, Tennessee, Delaware, Mississippi, South Carolina, Arkansas, Georgia, Texas, District of Columbia, Alabama, Los Angeles, Florida, San Diego, Chicago, Alaska, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Houston, and San Francisco).  Montana, Vermont, Idaho, Rhode Island, Maine, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Utah, Iowa, Hawaii, and Wyoming did not report any TB cases among U.S.-born non-Hispanic black or African American persons.

 

This horizontal bar graph shows individual state and city TB incidence per 100,000 U.S.-born non-Hispanic black or African American persons.  States and cities are categorized into 3 groups based on numbers of TB cases reported in 2017.  Within each group states and cities are ordered by increasing incidence and color coded by whether or not they met the 2020 national target (1.5), were between the 2020 target and national average (2.8), or had incidence above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 1-53 TB cases in 2017, incidence ranged from 1.3 in Kansas to 7.9 in New Hampshire.  Kansas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin had incidences at or below the 2020 target; no states or cities had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Baltimore, New Mexico, Delaware, Mississippi, District of Columbia, Alaska, and New Hampshire had incidences that were above the national average of.  Among states/cities that reported 54-140 TB cases in 2017, incidence among U.S.-born non-Hispanic black or African American persons ranged from 0.5 in Indiana to 9.6 in San Francisco.  Indiana, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Kentucky, Nevada, and Michigan had incidences at or below the 2020 target; Colorado, Oregon, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Philadelphia had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Tennessee, South Carolina, Arkansas, Alabama, Chicago, and San Francisco had incidences that were above the national average.  Among states/cities that reported 141 or more TB cases in 2017, incidence among U.S.-born non-Hispanic black or African American persons ranged from 1.1 in Maryland to 8.2 in Houston.  Maryland, Virginia, Arizona, Ohio, New York, and Illinois had incidences at or below the 2020 target; New Jersey, North Carolina, Massachusetts, California, and New York City had incidences that were above the 2020 target, but were at or below the national average; Louisiana, Washington, Georgia, Texas, Los Angeles, Florida, San Diego, Minnesota, and Houston had incidences that were above the national average.

3Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Reported Tuberculosis in the United States, 2017. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2018.

Page last reviewed: February 12, 2019