Protect yourself from COVID-19, Flu, and RSV

Protect yourself and others from Flu, COVID-19, and RSV

Respiratory viruses commonly cause illness such as flu, COVID-19, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), especially in the fall and winter. There are actions you can take to protect yourself and others. Learn about how to reduce your risk of getting sick from these viruses, and if they are spreading in your community. 

News about the season: Find weekly CDC updates

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What's happening near you
Based on healthcare visits for fever and cough or sore throat:
There is not enough data to say how much respiratory illness is in . You can benefit by getting your recommended vaccinations before respiratory illness is more widespread to reduce your risk of serious illness.
Now is a good time to get your recommended vaccinations before respiratory illness is more widespread to reduce your risk of serious illness.
Now is a good time to get your recommended vaccinations before respiratory illness is more widespread to reduce your risk of serious illness.
Now is the time to get your recommended vaccinations to reduce your risk of serious illness and protect yourself with other preventive actions.
It is important to take the time now to get your recommended vaccinations to reduce your risk of serious illness. You can also protect yourself with preventive actions and seek medical advice if you have symptoms.
It is especially important to take the time now to get your recommended vaccinations to reduce your risk of serious illness. You can also protect yourself with preventive actions and seek medical advice if you have symptoms.
Illness trends in
Based on visits to emergency departments:
Flu
RSV
COVID-19
Find more respiratory illness data, including a national overview
Weekly Viral Respiratory Illness Snapshot
in ,
  • If you are at high risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, talk with a healthcare provider about additional prevention actions.
  • If you are at high risk of getting very sick, wear a high-quality mask or respirator (e.g., N95) when indoors in public.
  • If you have household or social contact with someone at high risk for getting very sick, consider self-testing to detect infection before contact, and consider wearing a high-quality mask when indoors with them.
  • Wear a high-quality mask or respirator.
  • If you are at high risk of getting very sick, consider avoiding non-essential indoor activities in public where you could be exposed.
  • If you have household or social contact with someone at high risk for getting very sick, consider self-testing to detect infection before contact, and consider wearing a high-quality mask when indoors with them.
More ways to protect yourself and others
Stay up to date with immunizations recommended for you
  • For most people that means getting a current flu vaccine and a current COVID-19 vaccine. Find a vaccine at vaccines.gov.
  • CDC recommends that all infants receive protection from one of these tools to protect them from getting very sick with RSV.
  • Adults 60 years and older should talk to their healthcare provider about whether a single dose of RSV vaccine is right for them.
Practice good hygiene by covering your coughs and sneezes, washing or sanitizing your hands often, and cleaning frequently touched surfaces
Take steps for cleaner air, for example by bringing in as much fresh air as possible, purifying indoor air, or gathering outdoors
If you get sick, stay home and away from others to prevent spread
Seek health care for possible treatment if you get sick and have risk factors for severe illnes
Other tools you can use are masks and distancing

Classifications based on data representing the week ending 11/25/23 (Activity Levels, Illness Trends, Hospitalizations), using data as of 11/29/23 (Illness Trends) and 11/30/23 (Activity Levels, Hospitalizations).

Overall levels of respiratory illness are determined weekly based on the percentage of visits to emergency departments and primary care clinics for fever and cough or sore throat reported to ILINet; therefore, a variety of respiratory pathogens that cause similar symptoms may be included. Colors used for levels of respiratory illness were selected to represent the overarching ILINet categories and may not match colors displayed elsewhere.

For illness trends based on visits to emergency departments, trajectory classifications (increasing, stable, or decreasing) are based on a 3-week moving average to smooth week-to-week fluctuations. For example, a jurisdiction could see an increase in the most recent week, but still be classified as “stable” based on trends over the past three weeks. Learn more about respiratory illness data.

Datasets on data.cdc.gov: Activity Levels, Illness Trends, and Hospitalizations

illustration of a sick women
If you get sick, stay home.

Learn more about what you can do when you get sick with a respiratory virus.

Stay up to date

Find weekly CDC updates on the respiratory illness season.

View Updates

 

Respiratory Virus Data Channel findings.

View weekly snapshot