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Why it Matters

CDC is committed to strengthening the nation’s health security by protecting against public health threats, whether they begin at home or abroad, or if they are natural or man-made. We know that when we don’t respond quickly and to scale, outbreaks become epidemics, natural disasters become crucibles for illness, and the human toll of terrorist attacks can mount.

State and local health departments must stand ready to handle many different types of emergencies that threaten the health and resilience of families, communities, and the nation. Having people who know what to do, and having the resources in place to allow them to do their jobs, saves lives.

As one of the nation’s most critical public health investments, we have an obligation to capture our work annually and share lessons that inform our strategy over time. One way we do this is through our annual report, referred to as the National Snapshot for CDC’s preparedness and response investments.

Public Health Preparedness and Response National Snapshot 2017

The Public Health Preparedness and Response National Snapshot 2017 demonstrates how federal investments enhance our nation’s ability to respond to public health threats and emergencies. It is our most recent annual report where we present activities that occurred during 2015 and 2016. We spotlight select examples of our work that help inform our actions and investments going forward.

What is different about the 2017 report, compared to prior years, is that it does not include the Public Health Emergency Program (PHEP) state fact sheets in the body of the report. You can find state by state information online and available for download here.

Past Preparedness Reports from 2008-2016 can be found here.

Ready for Emergencies

The 2017 Snapshot highlights activities that occurred during 2015 and 2016 in the framework of three priorities. As our work is crosscutting, please read each section to get a full understanding of how our work integrates all levels and disciplines of public health throughout CDC, across sectors, and the globe.

Prepare

We prepare for public health threats by making sure workers are trained, systems are functioning, and critical medicines and supplies are available before an emergency happens:

Every Response is Local: Connecting with States………………………………….12

Health Security: How is the U.S. Doing?…………………………………………………15

Right Resources, Right Place, Right Time………………………………………………16

Keeping Lifesaving Research Safe and Secure……………………………………….20

Respond

We respond to emergencies with experts who stand up quickly when disaster strikes:

Four Responses at Once: An Unprecedented Challenge…………………………. 24

Special Section: 2016 Zika Response………………………………………………………..26

Laboratories: On the Frontlines of America’s Health……………………………….34

Emergency Leaders: The Future of Incident Response……………………………. 35

Connect

We connect strategically and effectively, bringing people together with the resources they need, sharing our best knowledge, and supporting our partners at every level and in every sector:

Global Training to Protect Us All………………………………………………………………38

Protecting Our Most Vulnerable ……………………………………………………………..40

The Power of Preparedness: National Preparedness Month……………………42

Communicating in Emergencies……………………………………………………………… 44

Our Zika Response

The spread of Zika virus has presented a complex challenge for the nation and the world. As public health responders and organizations raced to mount a response to Zika virus, many questions needed answers. CDC scientists and responders were activated in CDC’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC), This section of the National Snapshot captures work accomplished through CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency Response in support of the Zika response.

Looking Forward

Our nation is facing urgent public health emergencies, from Zika virus to the

growing opioid epidemic. As we meet these new challenges, we cannot let our

guard down.

Readiness to Respond……………………………………………………………………………49

Delivering Results through Partnership………………………………………………….50

A World of Protection…………………………………………………………………………….51

PHEP Funding State Fact Sheets

CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response provides funding and technical assistance to build public health preparedness and response capabilities nationwide. Most significantly, the Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) cooperative agreement provides funding to 50 states, 4 cities, and 8 insular areas. To learn more about PHEP funding for these locations, click on a jurisdiction in the map found here. The tab “Performance Metrics” provides links to the newest data in the 2017 report.

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