Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Infographic: New CDC Autism Data to Drive Action for Children and Families

New CDC Autism Data to drive action for children and families1 in 68 8-year-old children has been identified as having autism. The new estimate represents a 30% increase from 2008-2010.Research tells us the earlier a child with autism is identified and connected to services, the better. Most children were not diagnosed with autism until after age 4, even though children can be diagnosed as early as age 2. Almost half of children identified with autism have average or above average intellectual ability (an IQ above 85) compared to a third of children with autism a decade ago. Autism: What is CDC doing? Tracks numbers and characteristics; researches risk factors; promotes early identification.Putting CDC Autism Data to work. There is an urgent need to continue the search for answers and provide help for people living with autism. Tools and Resources: Putting data to action in the communityWhat should Parents know and do?If you have a concern about how your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, or moves, take action. Don’t wait. You know your child best. Talk to your child’s doctor about your concerns. At the same time, call your local early intervention program or school system for a free evaluation. Remember, you don’t need a diagnosis to get services. It’s never too late to get help for your child. Visit cdc.gov/actearly.Cdc.gov/autismNational Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

Download

New CDC Autism Data to Drive Action for Children and Families [PDF – 3MB]

Description

Title: New CDC Autism Data to Drive Action for Children and Families

1 in 68, 8 year old children has been identified as having autism. The new estimate represents a 30% increase from 2008-2010

Research tells us the earlier a child with autism is identified and connected to services, the better.

Most children were not diagnosed with autism until after the age of 4, even though children can be diagnosed as early as age 2.

Almost half of children identified with autism have average or above average intellectual ability (an IQ above 85) compared to a third of children with autism a decade ago.

Pie Chart showing IQ: 46% greater than 85, 23% between 71 and 85, and 31% less than or equal to 70

AUTISM: WHAT IS CDC DOING?

TRACKS numbers and early characteristics

RESEARCHES risk factors

PROMOTES Identification

PUTTING CDC AUTISM DATA TO WORK

There is an urgent need to continue the search for answers and provide help now for people living with autism.

Diagram: NEW DATA TO DRIVE ACTION, RAISE AWARENESS, PROMOTE EARLY IDENTIFICATION, PLAN FOR TRAINING AND SERVICE NEEDS, PRIORITIZE RESEARCH, INFORM POLICY

TOOLS AND RESOURCES: PUTTING DATA TO ACTION IN THE COMMUNITY

Healthcare providers can use CDC’s Autism Case Training to better identify and diagnose children with autism.

Early childhood educators can use CDC’s free checklists to monitor developmental milestones.

WHAT SHOULD PARENTS KNOW AND DO?

If you have a concern about how your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, or moves, take action. Don’t wait. You know your child best.

»Talk to your child’s doctor about your concerns.

» At the same time, call your local early intervention program or school system for a free evaluation.

» Remember, you don’t need a diagnosis to get services.

» It’s never too late to get help for your child.

Visit CDC.gov/ActEarly

CDC.gov/autism

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

www.cdc.gov/ncbddd

TOP