Surveillance for Certain Health Behaviors, Chronic Diseases, and Conditions, Access to Health Care, and Use of Preventive Health Services Among States and Selected Local Areas — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012

Pranesh P. Chowdhury, MD1; Tebitha Mawokomatanda, MSPH1; Fang Xu, PhD1; Sonya Gamble, MS1; David Flegel, MS2; Carol Pierannunzi, PhD1; William Garvin, MS1; Machell Town, PhD1 (View author affiliations)

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Abstract

Problem: Chronic diseases (e.g., heart diseases, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, and arthritis) and unintentional injuries are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Behavioral risk factors (e.g., tobacco use, poor diet, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, failure to use seat belts, and insufficient sleep) are linked to the leading causes of death. Modifying these behavioral risk factors and using preventive health services (e.g., cancer screenings and influenza and pneumococcal vaccination of adults aged ≥65 years) can substantially reduce morbidity and mortality in the U.S. population. Continuous monitoring of these health-risk behaviors, chronic conditions, and use of preventive services are essential to the development of health promotion strategies, intervention programs, and health policies at the state, city, and county level.

Reporting Period: January–December 2012.

Description of the System: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is an ongoing, state-based, random-digit–dialed landline- and cellular-telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years residing in the United States. BRFSS collects data on health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases and conditions, access to health care, and use of preventive health services related to the leading causes of death and disability. This report presents results for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, participating U.S. territories that include the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico) and Guam, 187 Metropolitan/Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MMSAs), and 210 counties (n = 475,687 survey respondents) for the year 2012.

Results: In 2012, the estimated prevalence of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases or conditions, access to health care, and use of preventive health services substantially varied by state and territory, MMSA, and county. The following portion of the abstract lists a summary of results by selected BRFSS measures. Each set of proportions refers to the range of estimated prevalence for health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases or conditions, and use of preventive health care services among geographical units, as reported by survey respondents. Adults with good or better health: 64.0%–88.3% for states and territories, 62.7%–90.5% for MMSAs, and 68.1%–92.4% for counties. Adults aged 18–64 years with health care coverage: 64.2%–93.1% for states and territories, 35.4%– 93.7% for MMSAs, and 35.4%–96.7% for counties. Adults who received a routine physical checkup during the preceding 12 months: 55.7%–80.1% for states and territories, 50.6%–85.0% for MMSAs, and 52.4%–85.0% for counties. An influenza vaccination received during the preceding 12 months among adults aged ≥65 years: 26.3%–70.1% for states and territories, 20.8%–77.8% for MMSAs, and 24.1%–77.6% for counties. Ever received pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged ≥65 years: 22.2%–76.2% for states and territories, 15.3%–83.4% for MMSAs, and 25.8%–85.2% for counties. Adults who had a dental visit in the past year: 53.7%–76.2% for states and territories, and 44.8%–81.7% for MMSAs and counties. Adults aged ≥65 years who have lost all of their natural teeth from tooth decay or gum disease: 7.0%–33.7% for states and territories, 5.8%–39.6% for MMSAs, and 5.8%–37.1% for counties. Adults aged 50–75 years who received a colorectal cancer screening on the basis of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation: 40.0%–76.4% for states and territories, 47.1%–80.7% for MMSAs, and 47.0%–81.0% for counties. Women aged 21–65 years who had a Papanicolaou test during the preceding 3 years: 68.5% to 89.6% for states and territories, 70.3% to 92.8% for MMSAs, and 65.7%–94.6% for counties. Women aged 50–74 years who had a mammogram during the preceding 2 years: 66.5%– 89.7% for states and territories, 61.1%–91.5% for MMSAs, and 61.8%–91.6% for counties. Current cigarette smoking among adults: 10.6%–28.3% for states and territories, 5.1%–30.1% for MMSAs, and 5.1%–28.3% for counties. Binge drinking among adults during the preceding month: 10.2%–25.2% for states and territories, 6.2%–28.1% for MMSAs, and 6.2%–29.5% for counties. Heavy drinking among adults during the preceding month: 3.5%–8.5% for states and territories, 2.0%–11.0% for MMSAs, and 1.9%–11.0% for counties. Adults who reported no leisure-time physical activity: 16.3%–42.4% for states and territories, 9.2%–47.3% for MMSAs, and 9.2%–39.0% for counties. Self- reported seat belt use: 62.0%–93.7% for states and territories, 54.1%–97.1% for MMSAs, and 50.1%–97.4% for counties. Adults who were obese: 20.5%–34.7% for states and territories, 14.8%–44.5% for MMSAs and counties. Adults with diagnosed diabetes: 7.0%–16.4% for states and territories, 3.4%–17.4% for MMSAs, and 3.1%–17.4% for counties. Adults who ever had any type of cancer: 3.0%–13.7% for states and territories, 3.8%–19.2% for MMSAs, and 4.5%–19.2% for counties. Adults with current asthma: 5.8%–11.1% for states and territories, 3.1%–15.0% for MMSAs, and 3.1%–15.7% for counties. Adults with some form of arthritis: 15.6%–36.4% for states and territories, 16.8%–45.8% for MMSAs, and 14.8%–35.9% for counties. Adults having had a depressive disorder: 9.0%–23.5% for states and territories, 9.2%–28.3% for MMSAs, and 8.5%–28.4% for counties. Adults aged ≥45 years who have had coronary heart disease: 7.4%–19.0% for states and territories, 6.1%–23.3% for MMSAs, and 6.1%–20.6% for counties. Adults aged ≥45 years who have had a stroke: 3.1%–7.3% for states and territories, 2.1%–9.3% for MMSAs, and 1.5%–9.3% for counties. Adults with limited activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems: 15.0%–28.6% for states and territories, 12.0%–31.7% for MMSAs, and 11.3%–31.7% for counties. Adults using special equipment because of any health problem: 4.8%–11.6% for states and territories, 4.0%–14.7% for MMSAs, and 2.8%–13.6% for counties.

Interpretation: This report underscores the need for continuous surveillance of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases or conditions, health care access, and use of preventive care services at state and local levels. It will help to identify high-risk populations and to evaluate public health intervention programs and policies designed to reduce morbidity and mortality from chronic disease and injury.

Public Health Action: State and local health departments and agencies can continue to use BRFSS data to identify populations at high risk for unhealthy behaviors and chronic diseases or conditions, lack of health care access, and inadequate use of preventive care services. Additionally, states can use the data to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate public health programs and policies at state and local levels.

Introduction

The goals of national health promotion and disease prevention are to prevent or delay disease, decrease premature mortality, and improve health-related quality of life for all U.S. residents (1). Chronic diseases (e.g., heart disease, cancer, chronic lower-respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, and arthritis) and unintentional injuries are the leading causes of death and disability in the United States (2). Engaging in healthy behaviors (e.g., quitting smoking, being more physically active, wearing seat belts while riding in vehicles, getting sufficient sleep, reducing alcohol consumption, and eating a nutritious diet) and using preventive services (e.g., routine medical checkup, blood pressure and cholesterol screening, cancer screening, and recommended vaccinations) can reduce morbidity and premature mortality from these chronic diseases and injuries (3). Monitoring health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases or conditions, and the use of preventive services to help identify high-risk groups with the greatest need for intervention is important for preventing morbidity and mortality and unintentional injuries.

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based landline and cellular telephone survey conducted by state health departments with assistance from CDC (4). Since 1984, BRFSS has been a unique source of data for health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases or conditions, health care access, and the use of preventive health services for states/territories. Since 2002, the large sample size in BRFSS has facilitated calculation of prevalence estimates for selected Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas (MMSAs), metropolitan divisions, and selected counties (5). BRFSS data are frequently used to set health goals as well as to monitor progress of public health programs and policy implementation at national, state, and local levels (6). This report provides prevalence estimates for selected health-risk behaviors, health care access, use of preventive care services, and chronic diseases or conditions by states/territories, selected MMSAs, and selected counties for 2012.

Methods

BRFSS is the largest continuously conducted telephone health survey in the world with approximately 400,000 adult interviews completed each year. BRFSS is conducted by states with assistance from CDC. BRFSS uses a multistage sampling design to select a representative sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population aged ≥18 years residing in states and territories of the Unites States (7). All the responses were self-reported; proxy interviews are not conducted by BRFSS.

Since 2011, BRFSS includes both landline telephone- and cellular telephone-based surveys. In conducting the BRFSS landline telephone survey, interviewers collect data from a randomly selected adult in a household. Cellular telephone interviews are treated as one-person adult household, and survey interviewers collect data from adults answering the cellular telephones (4). Using a dual-frame survey including combined landline and cellular telephones improved validity, data quality, and representativeness of BRFSS data (8).

Details on methodology, random sampling procedures, design, and reliability and validity of measures used in BRFSS have been described previously (9,10). MMSA and metropolitan divisions are defined by the Office of Management and Budget. County names were collected from the respondents during the demographics section of the interviews and were used to determine the corresponding American National Standards Institute county codes. Respondents were assigned to MMSAs on the basis of their county codes. MMSAs were included in this report if there were ≥500 respondents; similarly counties that had ≥500 respondents were included for county level estimates (11).

This report provides prevalence estimates for selected health risk behaviors, use of preventive health care services, and chronic conditions among residents living in the 50 states, the District of Columbia (DC), Guam, Puerto Rico, 187 MMSAs, and 210 counties.

Questionnaire

All questions included in BRFSS go through technical review, cognitive testing, and field testing before being placed in the questionnaire. The standard BRFSS questionnaire consists of three sections: core questions, optional modules, and state-added questions. Eligible respondents answer the same core questions. Optional modules were selected by states on the basis of the specific needs and goals of the programs in each state’s health department. Although core questions are always collected on both landline telephone and cellular telephones, optional module data might have been collected by landline telephone or cellular telephone. Not all modules are used by every state, and states can opt out of collecting any module data. States could have chosen to split the modules by dividing the samples so only a portion of the respondents answer certain module questions. In 2012, there were as many as three module versions; there were no split versions of a module whose data were collected only by cellular telephone. State-added questions are developed or acquired by participating states and are added to their questionnaires; they are not edited or evaluated by CDC.

The 2012 core questions (12) were used to inquire about participants’ health status, number of healthy days in the past 30 days, health care access, exercise, inadequate sleep, chronic health conditions, oral health, demographics, disability, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, immunization, falls, seat belt use, drinking and driving, breast and cervical cancer screening, prostate cancer screening, colorectal cancer screening, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The following optional models were used by at least one state in both the landline and cellular telephone survey during 2012 data collection: adult asthma history (two states), adult human papilloma virus (HPV) (six states), adverse childhood experience (four states), cancer survivorship (six states), childhood asthma prevalence (33 states), childhood immunization (12 states), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (11 states), diabetes (28 states), excess sun exposure (four states), consumption of fruits and vegetables (five states), general preparedness (two states), HIV/AIDS (two states), inadequate sleep (four states), mental illness and stigma (11 states), prediabetes (26 states), prostate cancer screening decision making module (three states), random child selection (36 states), reaction to race (two states), shingles (Zostavax or ZOS) (four states), social context (five states), sugar-sweetened beverages and menu labeling (11 states), tetanus-diphtheria vaccination in adults (four states), and veteran’s health (two states).

Data Collection and Processing

BRFSS data are collected according to standard BRFSS protocol across all states, DC, and participating territories (4). States can conduct interviews internally or opt to contract with a private company or university to conduct interviews but maintain standard procedures to ensure respondents’ confidentiality, document the quality of the interviewing process, and supervise and monitor the interviewers. Since 2007, BRFSS surveys have been collected monthly in all 50 states, DC, and participating U.S. territories. State-collected data are submitted to CDC for processing, checking, and weighting.

Sampling

A BRFSS sample record is one telephone number in the list of all telephone numbers selected for dialing. States obtain two types of samples of telephone numbers from CDC: one for landline telephone respondents and one for cellular telephone respondents. For the landline survey, all 50 states and DC used a disproportionate stratified sample (DSS) design; but Guam and Puerto Rico used a simple random sample design (4). In a DSS design, landline telephone numbers are divided into two groups, or strata: high-density and medium-density strata containing telephone numbers that are expected to belong mostly to households. The two strata are sampled to obtain a probability sample of all households with telephones. For the cellular telephone survey, phone samples are randomly drawn from confirmed cellular telephone sampling frames for each state (4). The target population for cellular telephone samples consist of adults aged ≥18 years, living in households or college housing who have a working cellular telephone, and receive ≥90% of their calls on cellular telephones (13). Because of the portability of the cellular telephone, some of the numbers in the cellular telephone sample will reach respondents who have moved into other states. In those cases, the contacting state completes the core BRFSS interview with respondents from other states; data from out-of-state interviews are transferred to the appropriate states at the end of each data-collection period.

Data Weighting

In 2011, a new weighting methodology called iterative proportional fitting (or “raking”) replaced post stratification. The latter had been used to weight the data every year before 2011. Raking allows incorporation of cellular telephone survey data and permits the introduction of additional demographic characteristics (e.g., education level, marital status, and home renter/owner) in addition to age-race/ethnicity-sex that improves the degree and extent to which the BRFSS sample properly reflects the sociodemographic make-up of both individual states and, when aggregated, the entire United States (14). After combining landline and cellular telephone data, BRFSS performs raking by adjusting one or a combination of demographic categories at a time in an iterative process until a convergence of a set value is reached. During 2012, state-level BRFSS raking included the following demographic categories: sex by age, detailed race and ethnicity groups, education levels, marital status, home renter/owner, sex by race and ethnicity, age groups by race and ethnicity, and phone-source. Those states that used regional weighting also included four additional categories: region, region by age, region by sex, and region by race and ethnicity. The state-level weights were raked to five margins including age group, sex, race and ethnicity group, sex by age group, and sex by race and ethnicity group at the MMSA or county level to produce MMSA or county weights. Information about weighting MMSA and county BRFSS data can be found on the BRFSS SMART webpage (11).

Statistical Analyses

To account for the complex sampling design of BRFSS, all the prevalence estimates were computed on the basis of a statistical analysis (SAS version 9.3, SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA) using weights and strata. The prevalence estimates in this report are direct estimates. This report provides unweighted sample size, weighted prevalence estimates with standard errors, and 95% confidence intervals for prevalence of health-risk behaviors, chronic diseases or conditions, and use of preventive health care services by states and territories, MMSAs, and counties on the basis of 2012 BRFSS data. If the unweighted sample size was represented by <50 survey participants or the relative standard error (RSE) was >30%, the results were suppressed to avoid unstable estimates. RSE was calculated by dividing the standard error by the estimated prevalence and multiplying by 100 (for percent). Responses coded as “do not know” or “refused” were excluded from the analyses.

About This Report

This report presents the results and a discussion of the following topics: 1) health status indicators (self-rated health status and health care coverage for persons aged 18–64 years), 2) preventive practices (recent routine physical checkup, influenza vaccination, and pneumococcal vaccination for persons aged ≥65 years), 3) oral health (dental visit in the past year and loss of all natural teeth among adults aged ≥65 years), 4) cancer screening (e.g., colorectal cancer screening, cervical cancer screening, and breast cancer screening), 5) health-risk behaviors (current cigarette smoking, binge drinking, heavy drinking, no leisure-time physical activity, and self-reported seat belt use), 6) chronic health conditions (obesity, diagnosed diabetes, cancer survivors, current asthma, arthritis, depression, coronary heart disease, and stroke for persons aged ≥45 years), and 7) disability (activity limitation and use of special equipment because of physical, mental, or emotional problems). The 2012 questionnaire and all related support documents are available on the BRFSS webpage (http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/annual_data/annual_2012.html).

Results

In 2012, a total of 475,687 adults completed interviews by landline and cellular telephones. For data collected by landline telephone, 377,013 respondents completed the interview and the numbers of participants ranged from 1,728 in Guam to 18,325 in Massachusetts (median: 6,085). For data collected by cellular telephone, 98,674 respondents completed the interview, with participant numbers ranging from 303 in Guam to 3,990 in Nebraska (median: 1,580). Response rates for BRFSS were calculated using the standard set by the American Association of Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) response rate formula 4 (RR4), which is the number of respondents who completed the survey as a proportion of all eligible and likely eligible persons (15). For landline telephone data, the RR4 response rate ranged from 28.2% in California to 62.9% in Puerto Rico (median: 49.1%) and the RR4 response rate for cellular telephone data ranged from 16.4% in Washington to 55.7% in Iowa (median: 35.3%). For combined landline telephone and cellular telephone data, the weighted response rate (based on a combination of the landline telephone response rate with the cellular telephone response rate proportional to the total sample used to collect the data for a state) ranged from 27.7% in California to 60.4% in South Dakota (median: 45.2%). Detailed information on response, cooperation, and refusal rates for landline and cellular telephone data can be found in the BRFSS 2012 Summary Data Quality Report (16).

Health Status Indicators

Health Status

Respondents were asked to rate their general health as excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. Those who reported their general health as excellent, very good, or good were categorized in one group, and the other group included those who reported their general health as fair or poor. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 64.0% in Puerto Rico to 88.3% in Minnesota (median: 82.9%) (Table 1). Among the selected 187 MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health among respondents ranged from 62.7% in Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico, to 90.5% in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota, Boulder, Colorado, and Hilton Head Island-Beaufort, South Carolina (median: 83.6%) (Table 2). Among the selected 210 counties, the estimated prevalence of self-reported good or better health among respondents ranged from 68.1% in San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico to 92.4% in Douglas County, Colorado (median: 84.4%) (Table 3).

Health Care Coverage

Health care coverage was defined as respondents having reported that they had private health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations) or government health plans (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid) among adults aged 18–64 years. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of health care coverage among persons aged 18–64 years ranged from 64.2% in Texas to 93.1% in Massachusetts (median: 79.6%) (Table 4). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 35.4% in McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas, to 93.7% in Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts (median: 80.7%) (Table 5). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 35.4% in Hidalgo County, Texas, to 96.7% in Norfolk County, Massachusetts (median: 81.4%) (Table 6).

Preventive Practices

Recent Routine Physical Checkup

A recent routine physical checkup was defined as a visit to a doctor for a general physical examination rather than for a specific injury, illness, or condition during the preceding 12 months. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of having a recent routine physical checkup among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 55.7% in Idaho to 80.1% in Delaware (median: 67.7%) (Table 7). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 50.6% in Norfolk, Nebraska, to 85.0% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 68.3%) (Table 8). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 52.4% in Utah County, Utah, to 85.0% in Barnstable County, Massachusetts (median: 68.0%) (Table 9).

Annual Influenza Vaccination for Adults Aged ≥65 Years

Respondents were asked whether they had the annual influenza vaccination. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of influenza vaccination among adults aged ≥65 years during the preceding 12 months ranged from 26.3% in Puerto Rico to 70.1% in Iowa (median: 60.1%) (Table 10). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence of annual influenza vaccination ranged from 20.8% in Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico, to 77.8% in Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina (median: 60.5%) (Table 11); among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 24.1% in San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico, to 77.6% in Kanawha County, West Virginia (median: 60.8%) (Table 12).

Pneumococcal Vaccination for Adults Aged ≥65 Years

In 2012, the estimated prevalence of ever having received a pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged ≥65 years ranged from 22.2% in Puerto Rico to 76.2% in Oregon (median: 68.5%) (Table 13). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 15.3% in Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico, to 83.4% in Eugene, Oregon (median: 70.0%) (Table 14). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 25.8% in San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico, to 85.2% in Denver County, Colorado (median: 70.1%) (Table 15).

Oral Health

Dental Visit in the Past Year

BRFSS assessed use of dental care services by asking when an adult last visited a dentist or a dental clinic for any reason. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of having had a dental visit in the past year among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 53.7% in Guam to 76.2% in Massachusetts (median: 67.2%) (Table 16). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 44.8% in McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas, to 81.7% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 67.5%) (Table 17). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 44.8% in Hidalgo County, Texas to 81.7% in Barnstable County, Massachusetts and Norfolk County, Massachusetts (median 68.9%) (Table 18).

Loss of All Natural Teeth for Adults Aged ≥65 Years

BRFSS assessed oral health status by asking adults the number of their permanent teeth were removed because of tooth decay or gum diseases. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who had lost all of their natural teeth ranged from 7.0% in Hawaii to 33.7% in West Virginia (median: 16.2%) (Table 19). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.8% in San Diego-Carlsbad, California, to 39.6% in Lafayette, Louisiana, (median: 15.8%) (Table 20). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.8% in San Diego County, California, to 37.1% in Aroostook County, Maine (median: 14.5%) (Table 21).

Cancer Screening

Colorectal Cancer Screening for Adults Aged 50–75 Years

The 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation for colorectal cancer screening in adults aged 50–75 years is a blood stool test (either a guaiac fecal occult blood testing [FOBT] or fecal immunochemical test [FIT]) every year, a colonoscopy every 10 years, or a flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years with FOBT every 3 years. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of adults aged 50–75 years who received a colorectal cancer screening on the basis of the USPSTF recommendation ranged from 40.0% in Guam to 76.4% in Massachusetts (median: 64.9%) (Table 22). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 47.1% in El Paso, Texas, to 80.7% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 67.0%) (Table 23). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 47.0% in El Paso County, Texas to 81.0% in Washington County, Rhode Island (median: 67.3%) (Table 24).

Cervical Cancer Screening for Women Aged 21–65 Years

In 2012, the estimated prevalence of women aged 21–65 years who have not had a hysterectomy and had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test during the preceding 3 years ranged from 68.5% in Guam to 89.6% in Massachusetts (median: 84.0%) (Table 25). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 70.3% in Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico, to 92.8% in Lewiston-Auburn, Maine (median: 85.2%) (Table 26). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 65.7% in Canyon County, Idaho to 94.6% in Lorain County, Ohio (median: 85.9%) (Table 27).

Breast Cancer Screening for Women Aged 50–74 years

A mammogram is a radiograph of each breast used to test for breast cancer. The state-specific estimated prevalence of having a mammogram during the preceding 2 years among women aged 50–74 years ranged from 66.5% in Wyoming to 89.7% in Massachusetts (median: 78.4%) (Table 28). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 61.1% in Fort Wayne, Indiana to 91.5% in Barnstable Town, Massachusetts (median: 79.6%) (Table 29). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 61.8% in Natrona County, Wyoming to 91.6% in Suffolk County, Massachusetts (median: 79.7%) (Table 30).

Health-Risk Behaviors

Current Cigarette Smoking

Respondents were classified as current smokers if they reported having smoked at least 100 cigarettes during their lifetime and indicated that they smoked every day or some days at the time of survey participation. The estimated prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 10.6% in Utah to 28.3% in Kentucky (median: 19.6%) (Table 31). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.1% in Provo-Orem, Utah to 30.1% in Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio (median: 19.5%) (Table 32). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 5.1% in Utah County, Utah, to 28.3% in Lorain County, Ohio (median: 18.3%) (Table 33).

Binge Drinking

Binge drinking was defined for men aged ≥18 years as having on average five or more drinks during one occasion and for women aged ≥18 years as having on average four or more drinks on one occasion during the preceding month. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of binge drinking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 10.2% in West Virginia to 25.2% in Wisconsin (median: 16.9%) (Table 34). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.2% in Provo-Orem, Utah to 28.1% in Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota (median: 17.2%) (Table 35). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.2% in Utah County, Utah, to 29.5% in Lincoln County, South Dakota (median: 17.5%) (Table 36).

Heavy Drinking

For men aged ≥18 years, heavy drinking was defined as having, on average, more than two drinks per day during the preceding month; women aged ≥18 years were heavy drinkers if they had, on average, more than one drink per day during the preceding month. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of heavy drinking among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 3.5% in West Virginia to 8.5% in Wisconsin and Montana (median: 6.1%) (Table 37). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.0% in Provo-Orem, Utah to 11.0% in Hilo, Hawaii (median: 6.1%) (Table 38). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.9% in Utah County, Utah to 11.0% in Hawaii County, Hawaii (median: 6.1%) (Table 39).

No Leisure-Time Physical Activity

No leisure-time physical activity was defined from the respondent’s indication of no participation in any physical activities or exercise (e.g., running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking for exercise) other than their regular job during the preceding month. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 16.3% in Oregon to 42.4% in Puerto Rico (median: 23.1%) (Table 40). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 9.2% in Boulder, Colorado, to 47.3% in Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico (median: 22.2%) (Table 41). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 9.2% in Boulder County, Colorado, to 39.0% in Robeson County, North Carolina (median: 21.5%) (Table 42).

Seat Belt Use

Respondents were asked how often (always, nearly always, sometimes, seldom, and never) they use a seat belt when they drive or ride in a car. In 2012, the estimate of always wearing a seat belt among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 62.0% in South Dakota to 93.7% in California (median: 84.7%) (Table 43). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 54.1% in Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont, to 97.1% in San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California (median: 85.7%) (Table 44). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 50.1% in Coos County, New Hampshire, to 97.4% in Clackamas County, Oregon (median: 86.0%) (Table 45).

Chronic Health Conditions

Obesity

Self-reported weight and height were used to calculate body mass index (BMI) (weight [kg]/height [m2]). Respondents were obese if their BMI was ≥30.0. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years with obesity ranged from 20.5% in Colorado to 34.7% in Louisiana (median: 28.1%) (Table 46). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 14.8% in Boulder, Colorado, to 44.5% in McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas (median: 28.3%) (Table 47). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 14.8% in Boulder County, Colorado, to 44.5% in Hidalgo County, Texas (median: 26.7%) (Table 48).

Diabetes

Respondents were identified as having diabetes if they reported ever being told by a doctor that they have diabetes. For this report, gestational diabetes, prediabetes, or borderline diabetes were not included in the estimates. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 7.0% in Alaska to 16.4% in Puerto Rico (median: 9.7%) (Table 49). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.4% in Boulder, Colorado, to 17.4% in Lumberton, North Carolina (median: 9.6%) (Table 50). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.1% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 17.4% in Robeson County, North Carolina (median: 9.3%) (Table 51).

Cancer Survivors

Respondents were identified as being a cancer survivor if they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that they had any type of cancer, including skin cancer. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of cancer survivors among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 3.0% in Guam to 13.7% in Florida (median: 11.0%) (Table 52). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.8% in Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico, to 19.2% in Ocean City, New Jersey (median: 10.8%) (Table 53). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.5% in Hudson County, New Jersey, to 19.2% in Cape May County, New Jersey (median: 10.8%) (Table 54).

Currently Have Asthma

Respondents were identified as currently having asthma if they reported having ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional that they had asthma and still had it during the time of the survey. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of current asthma among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 5.8% in Guam to 11.1% in Kentucky and Maine (median: 8.9%) (Table 55). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.1% in McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas, to 15.0% in Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey (median: 8.9%) (Table 56). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 3.1% in Hidalgo County, Texas, to 15.7% in Hampden County, Massachusetts (median: 9.2%) (Table 57).

Arthritis

Respondents were identified as having arthritis if they had ever been told by a health professional that they had some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of arthritis among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 15.6% in Guam to 36.4% in West Virginia (median: 25.5%) (Table 58). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 16.8% in Heber, Utah, to 45.8% in Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 25.3%) (Table 59). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 14.8% in Travis County, Texas, to 35.9% in Aroostook County, Maine and Mobile County, Alabama (median: 24.5%) (Table 60).

Depression

Depression was defined as having ever been told by a health professional that the participants had a depressive disorder, which includes depression, major depression, dysthymia, or minor depression. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of depression among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 9.0% in Guam to 23.5% in Kentucky (median: 17.6%) (Table 61). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 9.2% in Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, metropolitan division, California, to 28.3% in Lewiston-Auburn, Maine (median: 18.2%) (Table 62). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 8.5% in Union County, New Jersey, to 28.4% in Androscoggin County, Maine (median: 17.8%) (Table 63).

Coronary Heart Disease

Respondents were identified as having coronary heart disease if they reported that they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional that they had a heart attack (also known as myocardial infarction, or MI) or angina (i.e., coronary heart disease). In 2012, the estimated prevalence of coronary heart disease among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 7.4% in Hawaii to 19.0% in West Virginia (median: 11.4%) (Table 64). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.1% in Boulder, Colorado, to 23.3% in Charleston, West Virginia (median: 11.0%) (Table 65). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 6.1% in Boulder County, Colorado, to 20.6% in Kanawha County, West Virginia (median: 10.0%) (Table 66).

Stroke

Respondents were identified as having had a stroke if they had ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional that they had a stroke. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of stroke among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 3.1% in Colorado to 7.3% in Mississippi (median: 4.7%) (Table 67). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.1% in Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland, to 9.3% in Mobile, Alabama (median: 4.4%) (Table 68). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 1.5% in Montgomery County, Maryland, to 9.3% in Mobile County, Alabama (median: 4.4%) (Table 69).

Disability

Activity Limitation

Respondents were asked if they were limited in any way from performing any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of activity limitation among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 15.0% in Guam to 28.6% in West Virginia (median: 20.0%) (Table 70). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 12.0% in Heber, Utah, to 31.7% in Eugene, Oregon (median: 20.3%) (Table 71). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 11.3% in Wake County, North Carolina, to 31.7% in Lane County, Oregon (median: 19.5%) (Table 72).

Use of Special Equipment

Respondents were asked if they currently had any health problem that required them to use special equipment (e.g., a cane, a wheelchair, a special bed, or a special telephone), which included occasional use or use in certain circumstances. In 2012, the estimated prevalence of using special equipment because of any health problem among adults aged ≥18 years ranged from 4.8% in Guam to 11.6% in Kentucky (median: 8.0%) (Table 73). Among selected MMSAs, the estimated prevalence ranged from 4.0% in Boulder, Colorado, to 14.7% in Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia (median: 7.8%) (Table 74). Among selected counties, the estimated prevalence ranged from 2.8% in Douglas County, Colorado, to 13.6% in Thurston County, Washington (median: 7.5%) (Table 75).

Discussion

The findings in this report indicate substantial geographic variations in the estimated prevalence of health status indicators, preventive practices, oral health, cancer screening, health-risk behaviors, chronic health conditions, and disability status among adults in the United States at the state and territory, MMSA, and county level. These variations in crude (unadjusted) estimates might reflect differences in demographic characteristics (e.g., age, race, and sex distribution), socioeconomic conditions (e.g., education attainment, income, and employment status), cultural contexts, health care access and cost, state laws and local ordinances, or combinations of these factors. The results provided in this report were estimated on the basis of survey results (i.e., direct estimates) and might differ from those derived by other methods.

Health Status Indicators

Although measured by a single question, self-reported health status encompasses physical health, mental health, and functional capacity of a person (17). It has been validated as an independent predictor of mortality (18) and is a useful proxy indicator for perceived prevalence of acute and chronic health conditions (19). For this report, self-assessed health status was reported for good or better health. Large variations in self-rated health at the state and local levels suggest differences in the underlying etiology and severity of specific diseases and illnesses, health care access, and residents’ health related behaviors among states and territories, MMSAs, and counties. Health services research has identified that having no health insurance is a risk indicator for lower overall health status, exacerbation of chronic disease indicators (e.g., uncontrolled and undiagnosed hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia), and less access to and use of preventive health care services (e.g., blood pressure monitoring, cholesterol screening, and age appropriate cancer screenings) (20,21). In 2012, the median prevalence of health care coverage among adults aged ≤65 years at the state and local levels was approximately 81%.

Preventive Practices

A routine physical checkup can help persons stay healthy and prevent or delay disease and disability. A visit to a doctor for a routine checkup can help to identify a disease (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, and cancer) and other health problems in the early stages of development when they are most successfully treated (22); these visits also can provide opportunities for disease prevention and patient education. In 2012, the median prevalence of having received a routine physical checkup among adults, at the state or local level, was approximately 66%. In addition to geographic variation, access to health care, socioeconomic factors (e.g., education and income), and marital status are associated with routine medical checkups (23).

Influenza and pneumonia together are the seventh leading cause of death among adults aged ≥65 years (2). The vaccinations against influenza and pneumonia are safe, effective, and cost efficient ways to reduce the morbidity and mortality from these diseases in older adults (24). In 2012, the median prevalence of having received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months or ever having a pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged ≥65 was approximately 61% and 71%, respectively. Estimates of influenza vaccination prevalence measured in this report are calculated from interview data collected during the calendar year and measures the proportion of persons reporting influenza vaccination during the 12 months preceding the survey. Therefore, annual estimates represent a weighted average of incomplete estimates for up to three influenza seasons. The variation in influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage levels observed among states and local areas suggests that coverage levels for both vaccines can be improved. Strategies such as clinician reminders, team change, and patient outreach along with patient financial incentives, audit, and feedback (for influenza vaccination only) and clinician education, case management (for pneumococcal vaccination only) can be employed at the state and local levels to increase the rates of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations among older adults (25).

Oral Health

The Surgeon General’s report on oral health in America described the mouth as a mirror of health (26). A thorough oral examination can detect signs of numerous general health problems (e.g., nutritional deficiencies), systemic diseases (e.g., microbial infections and immune disorders), injuries, and some cancers. Routine dental visits can help prevent and control the most common oral diseases including dental caries (tooth decay) and periodontal disease (26). The loss of one’s natural teeth can reduce quality of life in many ways (e.g., bringing pain and distress, lowering self-esteem, and making it more difficult to eat, relax, or socialize) (27). Periodontal disease and dental caries are the leading causes of tooth loss (28); tooth loss is associated with poor nutrition, coronary artery disease, diabetes, smoking, and rheumatoid arthritis (29). In 2012, at the state and local levels, the median prevalence of having had a dental visit in the past year was 69%; 14% of adults aged ≥65 had lost all their natural teeth. These findings suggest an unmet need for oral health care and needs for oral disease prevention and health promotion programs at state and local levels.

Cancer Screening

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the United States following heart disease (2) and it is the leading cause of death among both men and women aged 40–79 years (30). Colorectal cancer is the third most-commonly diagnosed of new cancer cases and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women (30). Colorectal cancer usually begins from polyps present in the rectum or colon. The FOBT/FIT, colonoscopy, and a flexible-sigmoidoscopy, are the recommended screening tests for early detection of precancerous polyps and prevention of colorectal cancer (31). In 2012, the median prevalence of colorectal cancer screening based on the 2008 USPSTF recommendation was 67% at the state and local levels—a finding that suggests the need for population-based strategies to improve colorectal cancer screening efforts at the state and local levels.

The primary cause of cervical cancer is HPV. Early-stages of cervical cancer often can be detected easily with two tests: 1) a Pap test and 2) an HPV test (32). A Pap test that detects precancerous or abnormal cells in the cervix and a HPV test looks for the HPV that caused the precancerous or abnormal cervical cells (32). The numbers of cases and deaths from cervical cancer have declined substantially during the past decades because of early detection of cervical cancer by the Pap test and early treatment (33). USPSTF recommends that women aged 21–29 years should receive the Pap test to screen for cervical cancer every 3 years (34). Women aged 30–65 years can continue receiving the Pap test every 3 years or the Pap test in combination with the HPV test every 5 years (34). Among women aged 21–65 years, the median prevalence of having received a Pap test varied in 2012 from 66% to 93% at the state and local levels. The variation in Pap test screening rates among women in this age group at state and local levels might be related to health care access and other barriers to screening.
Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of cancer mortality in women (30). Mammograms can detect breast cancer at an early stage, when it is most treatable. This combination of early detection and advances in treatment has helped to reduce the rate of death from breast cancer in the United States (35). USPSTF recommends biennial screening mammography for women aged 50–74 years (36). In 2012, the median prevalence of having had a mammogram in the preceding 2 years for women aged 50–74 varied from 78% to 80% for the state, MMSAs, and counties.

Health-risk Behaviors

Health-risk behaviors are unhealthy behaviors that persons can change. Tobacco use, diet and activity patterns, and alcohol use are the major contributors to deaths in the United States (37). Cigarette smoking is the single-most preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States (38). The prevalence of disease and death from tobacco use is overwhelmingly caused by cigarettes and other combusted tobacco products. Cigarette smoking has been causally linked to diseases of nearly all organs of the body and can harm the fetus during pregnancy (38). Moreover, secondhand tobacco smoke has been causally linked to lung cancer as well as respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and it can damage the health of infants and children (38). The prevalence of current cigarette smoking among U.S. adults aged ≥18 years declined during 2005–2010 (39); however, current cigarette smoking remains widespread. The median prevalence of current cigarette smoking (19.6%) indicates the need for sustained, adequately funded, comprehensive tobacco control programs at the state and local levels (40).

Excessive alcohol consumption, including binge and heavy drinking, is one of the leading preventable causes of death in the United States (41). Binge and heavy drinking can lead to risky sexual activity, unintentional injuries (e.g., motor-vehicle crashes), falls, violence, and suicide (42); excessive alcohol consumption can lead to development of high blood pressure, liver disease, some cancers, dementia, and alcohol dependence (42). This report highlighted the variation in the prevalence of binge and heavy drinking among states/territories, MMSAs, and counties that might be attributable to cultural factors as well as the state/local laws governing the price, availability, and marketing of alcoholic beverages. Evidence-based population-level strategies recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force can be implemented to reduce and prevent excessive alcohol consumption (43).

Being physically active is an important step persons can take to improve their health; physical activity improves cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness and bone health. It helps to control weight, reduces risk for early death, cardiovascular diseases (e.g., heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure), diabetes, and cancer (e.g., colon and breast), and prevents falls (44). The 2012 BRFSS survey measured the prevalence of participation in any physical activities or exercises (e.g., running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking during the preceding month). This report indicates the need for continued effort to increase the physical activity in the population at the state and local levels.

Accidents or unintentional injuries are the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States (2). Unintentional motor-vehicle traffic injury is the second-leading cause of injury deaths among all U.S. residents (45). Seat belt use can reduce the risk for fatal injury to front-seat car occupants by 45% and the risk for moderate-to-critical injury by 50% (46). Laws and law enforcement levels related to seat belt use vary by state (47). The findings in this report indicate a great variation in seat belt use across states (62%–92%), MMSAs (54%–97%), and counties (50%–97%), despite the fact that all states have seat belt laws. Populations with lower use of seat belts are at risk for injury and death from motor vehicle crashes.

Chronic Conditions

Chronic diseases represented seven of the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States in 2013. Heart disease, malignant neoplasms (cancers), cerebrovascular diseases, and diabetes mellitus are the leading, second-, fourth-, and fifth-leading causes of death, respectively (2). BRFSS helps monitor these chronic diseases, along with chronic conditions like obesity, asthma, arthritis, and depression, to help states and local areas plan, implement, and track health interventions.

Obesity

Obesity continues to be a critical public health problem (48); it increases the risk for various chronic conditions like type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease, and certain types of cancer (49).The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data indicated that the obesity prevalence among U.S. adults had not changed significantly from 2003–2004 to 2011–2012; however, approximately one third of adults are obese (50). The high median prevalence of obesity at the state and local levels (range: 26.7%–28.1%) underscores the need for close monitoring of the obesity trend at the state and local levels and for implementing interventions that address obesity.

Diabetes

Diabetes is associated with extensive and serious complications that might involve many organs including loss of vision, lower-extremity amputation, heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, kidney disease, skin infection (e.g., bacterial and fungal infection), periodontitis, erectile dysfunction, depression, and complications of pregnancy (51). In 2012, the median prevalence of diagnosed diabetes ranged from 9.3% to 9.7% at state and local levels. The disease and its complications often can be prevented, delayed, or controlled by closely monitoring and controlling blood glucose through healthy eating, increasing physical activity, taking prescribed medications, and receiving proper diabetes-related preventive care services that frequently focus on areas like foot health and diabetic patient education (52).

Cancer Survivors

A cancer survivor is any person living with a history of cancer (53). The population of cancer survivors in this country has been steadily increasing since 1970; the prevalence is projected to approach 18 million by 2022 (54). The increases in the number of cancer survivors are largely because of aging and growth of the population as well as advances in cancer detection and treatments (55). At the state and local levels, the median prevalence of cancer survivorship (11%) among BRFSS participants indicates a growing need to monitor cancer survivors to address their special health issues and needs (55) at state and local levels, including quitting tobacco use, being active and maintaining a healthy weight, and discussing follow-up care with a health care provider.

Current Asthma

Asthma is a common chronic disorder of the airways involved with breathing and respiration, characterized by periods of reversible airflow obstruction known as asthma exacerbations or attacks (56). Many persons with asthma have only occasional, mild symptoms, but others have severe asthma that can interfere with daily activity or even be life-threatening. The report on national surveillance of asthma indicated that current asthma prevalence increased from 2001 to 2010 and that there were no significant changes in rates for hospital outpatient department visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations for asthma (57). In 2012, the overall median prevalence of current asthma was 9%; BRFSS data indicated variability in estimated current asthma prevalence at the state, MMSA, and county level indicates the need for continued asthma surveillance in the United States.

Arthritis

Arthritis is the most common cause of disability among U.S. adults (58). Data from the 2010–2012 National Health Interview Survey indicated that 22.7% of adults reported having doctor-diagnosed arthritis and 43.2% of those with arthritis reported arthritis-attributable activity limitations. Moreover, approximately half of the adults with heart disease and diabetes and about one third of the adults who were obese had arthritis (59). In the 2012 BRFSS, the median prevalence of reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis was 25% at state and local levels, which indicates a substantial personal and societal prevalence of arthritis in the United States.

Depression

Depression is the leading cause of disability in the Global Burden of Disease during 2010 as measured by Years Lived with Disability and Disability Adjusted Life Years (60). Depressive disorders are more common among persons with chronic conditions (e.g., obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, and cancer) and among those with unhealthy behaviors (e.g., smoking, physical inactivity, and binge drinking) (61,62). It is also associated with decreased productivity in the workplace and an increased risk for absenteeism from work (63). In 2012, the median prevalence of depression was 18% at the state and local levels; the variations of prevalence among states, MMSAs, and counties indicate the need for targeted prevention and intervention efforts and the allocation of mental health treatment resources at the state and local levels.

Heart Disease and Stroke

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death in the United States. During 2011–2012, heart disease accounted for 170.5 deaths and stroke accounted for 36.9 deaths per 100,000 population (2). Stroke is the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States and costs $34 billion annually (64). In 2012, the prevalence of self-reported coronary heart disease and stroke among adults aged ≥45 years ranged from 6%–21% and 2%–9%, respectively, at the state and local levels. This report indicates wide variation in prevalence of coronary heart disease and stroke. It is essential for states and local areas to take initiatives to improve access and quality of health care systems and to continue to build environments that support healthy behaviors through community and clinical prevention strategies (65).

Disability

Disability or health impairment caused by limitation of activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems can affect health, functioning, and quality of life (66). During 2010 in the United States, approximately 56.7 million persons were living with some kind of disability and 12.6% of them had severe disability (67). Disability is associated with low socioeconomic status; persons with disabilities are more likely to be poor, experience barriers to education, employment, and health care (68). Persons with disabilities often require the use of special equipment and access to assistive technology to improve functioning, independence, and participation in community life (e.g., work, school, and social functions) (69).

In the 2012 BRFSS, the median prevalence of disability or health impairment was 20% at the state and local levels and the prevalence of special equipment usage (e.g., a cane, a wheelchair, a special bed, or special telephone) because of any health problem ranged from 5% to 14% at state, MMSA, and county levels. Because of the aging of the population, the number of adults reporting a disability is likely to increase, along with the need for appropriate medical and public health services; therefore, it is essential to continue surveillance of disability rates and the need for special equipment in the United States, to address quality of life issues for persons living with disabilities.

Limitations

The findings in this report are subject to at least four limitations. First, BRFSS results might not be generalizable to the entire U.S. population because the BRFSS survey design excludes persons living in institutions, nursing homes, long-term–care facilities, military installations, and correctional institutions. In addition, because participants answer the survey on a cellular or landline telephone, persons without access to either type of telephone are excluded. Second, BRFSS data are self-reported, so the information is subject to recall (e.g., diagnosis of diabetes and duration of physical activity) and social desirability bias (e.g., underreporting of actual weight). Third, although BRFSS surveys are conducted in several languages other than English (i.e., Spanish, Mandarin, and Portuguese), the survey does not apply to persons who speak other languages exclusively. Finally, because of the small sample size producing unreliable estimates, the prevalence of certain variables (e.g., influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged ≥65 years) could not be obtained among residents living within certain MMSAs or counties.

Overall, BRFSS is a cost-effective, timely, and flexible survey that makes data available to state health departments and local communities so they can assess and monitor the health risk behaviors, chronic conditions, use of preventive health care services, health impairments, and disabilities of their residents. The response over time within BRFSS and the prevalence rates from the BRFSS survey might differ from other national and state surveys because of differences in wording of questions, the number of questions focusing on a measure or topic, survey modes (telephone versus in person), length of questionnaire, format of the questionnaire, and sampling frame.

Researchers have found BRFSS data to be reliable and to have an overall high level of validity when compared with data from other surveys (9,10); prevalence estimates from BRFSS were consistent with other national survey databases (70). Despite concerns about declines in telephone survey response rates, BRFSS response rates compare favorably to those of telephone surveys (16). The raking weighting methods used by the BRFSS survey reduces the nonresponse and noncoverage bias and helps to match more accurately the sample distribution of BRFSS to known demographic characteristics of state populations.

BRFSS data have been used in a variety of ways to improve health. Federal, state, and local health officials continue to use BRFSS as a tool for monitoring and responding to public health emergencies (71), such as the seasonal influenza vaccine shortage (2004–2005) and the effects of hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma in 2005 as well as to monitor prevalence rates of influenza-like illness and the use of H1N1 vaccination that are a part of pandemic planning (since 2009). The asthma call-back survey, funded by the National Asthma Control Program and conducted with BRFSS respondents (who reported an asthma diagnosis), helps in asthma surveillance in the United States (72). Since 2002, the Safety and Health Assessment and Research for Prevention program at the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries has been adding industry and occupation questions to the Washington BRFSS to identify worker populations with a high prevalence of chronic diseases or conditions and injury to target disease prevention efforts in work places (73).

Conclusion

In the United States, major risk factors contributing to the prevalence of chronic disease and injury include tobacco use, poor diet (e.g., low in fruits and vegetables and high in sodium and saturated fat), physical inactivity, low seat belt use, excessive alcohol consumption, and high blood pressure. All of these risk factors can be effectively addressed at both the individual and population levels. CDC works to prevent chronic diseases and injuries through four domains: epidemiology and surveillance, environmental approaches, health care system interventions, and community-clinical links (74).

State and local health departments and agencies can use data from BRFSS to monitor risk factors, chronic conditions, and use of preventive health care practices related to chronic disease and injury. Specifically, BRFSS data can be used to evaluate public health policies and programs, to identify the needs for additional support or resources for programs, to identify emerging health problems, to educate leaders and decision makers about health-related issues, and to monitor progress toward achieving health objectives at state and local levels.

Corresponding author: Machell Town, PhD, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC. Telephone: 770-488-4681; E-mail: mpt2@cdc.gov.


1Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC; 2Northrop Grumman Corporation, Atlanta, Georgia

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Return to your place in the textTABLE 1. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 9,002 75.0 0.7 (73.7–76.3)
Alaska 4,328 85.9 0.7 (84.5–87.3)
Arizona 7,289 81.9 0.8 (80.4–83.4)
Arkansas 5,167 76.3 0.8 (74.8–77.9)
California 14,570 82.3 0.5 (81.4–83.2)
Colorado 12,210 85.5 0.4 (84.6–86.3)
Connecticut 8,751 85.8 0.5 (84.8–86.9)
Delaware 5,168 83.6 0.7 (82.2–85.0)
District of Columbia 3,809 87.9 0.8 (86.4–89.4)
Florida 7,572 80.1 0.7 (78.6–81.5)
Georgia 6,089 82.5 0.7 (81.2–83.8)
Hawaii 7,571 85.2 0.6 (84.0–86.5)
Idaho 5,872 84.4 0.8 (82.8–85.9)
Illinois 5,576 82.6 0.8 (81.1–84.2)
Indiana 8,578 80.0 0.6 (78.9–81.1)
Iowa 7,146 86.0 0.5 (85.1–87.0)
Kansas 11,775 84.0 0.5 (83.1–85.0)
Kentucky 11,188 76.1 0.6 (74.9–77.3)
Louisiana 9,046 77.5 0.7 (76.2–78.8)
Maine 9,861 83.9 0.5 (83.0–84.9)
Maryland 12,788 84.2 0.6 (83.1–85.4)
Massachusetts 21,671 86.6 0.4 (85.9–87.3)
Michigan 10,485 82.9 0.5 (81.9–83.9)
Minnesota 12,225 88.3 0.4 (87.5–89.0)
Mississippi 7,765 76.6 0.6 (75.4–77.9)
Missouri 6,731 81.3 0.7 (80.0–82.6)
Montana 8,655 84.2 0.5 (83.3–85.2)
Nebraska 19,132 85.6 0.4 (84.9–86.3)
Nevada 4,832 81.1 0.8 (79.4–82.7)
New Hampshire 7,510 86.5 0.6 (85.4–87.6)
New Jersey 15,702 83.9 0.4 (83.1–84.7)
New Mexico 8,757 78.9 0.6 (77.8–80.0)
New York 6,004 82.5 0.7 (81.1–84.0)
North Carolina 11,844 80.7 0.5 (79.8–81.6)
North Dakota 4,845 86.6 0.6 (85.4–87.8)
Ohio 13,001 81.7 0.5 (80.8–82.6)
Oklahoma 7,990 81.0 0.6 (79.9–82.1)
Oregon 5,286 81.8 0.7 (80.4–83.2)
Pennsylvania 19,798 83.1 0.4 (82.3–83.9)
Rhode Island 5,468 83.7 0.7 (82.3–85.0)
South Carolina 12,738 81.1 0.5 (80.1–82.0)
South Dakota 7,862 86.9 0.6 (85.8–88.1)
Tennessee 7,036 78.9 0.6 (77.7–80.2)
Texas 9,051 80.8 0.6 (79.7–81.9)
Utah 12,385 86.9 0.4 (86.1–87.7)
Vermont 6,041 88.0 0.5 (86.9–89.0)
Virginia 7,374 82.5 0.6 (81.4–83.7)
Washington 15,288 83.8 0.4 (83.0–84.7)
West Virginia 5,400 74.8 0.7 (73.5–76.1)
Wisconsin 5,292 86.0 0.7 (84.6–87.4)
Wyoming 6,259 85.1 0.7 (83.7–86.5)
Guam 2,025 78.2 1.2 (75.7–80.6)
Puerto Rico 6,316 64.0 0.7 (62.6–65.3)
Median 82.9
Range 64.0–88.3

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
*Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.
Metropolitan division.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 2. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
MMSA(s) Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico 549 62.7 2.3 (58.1–67.3)
Akron, Ohio 744 79.5 2.1 (75.4–83.5)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 3,266 82.3 0.8 (80.6–83.9)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 1,344 83.2 1.6 (80.1–86.2)
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California 1,037 87.0 1.4 (84.3–89.7)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,501 86.3 1.1 (84.1–88.4)
Asheville, North Carolina 592 83.6 1.8 (80.1–87.1)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,535 86.5 0.9 (84.8–88.3)
Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey 1,021 83.5 1.5 (80.6–86.5)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 1,034 82.4 2.1 (78.3–86.5)
Augusta-Waterville, Maine 830 82.2 1.6 (79.1–85.4)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,380 84.2 1.6 (81.0–87.4)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,716 83.5 0.8 (81.8–85.1)
Bangor, Maine 920 82.4 1.6 (79.2–85.6)
Barnstable Town, Massachusetts 557 88.4 1.7 (85.0–91.7)
Barre, Vermont 515 89.5 1.7 (86.2–92.8)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,390 80.0 1.6 (76.8–83.1)
Bellingham, Washington 846 88.0 1.4 (85.3–90.7)
Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont 709 79.1 2.4 (74.3–83.8)
Billings, Montana 846 84.6 1.4 (81.9–87.3)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,820 78.3 1.3 (75.8–80.7)
Bismarck, North Dakota 817 86.1 1.5 (83.2–89.1)
Boise City, Idaho 1,479 85.9 1.4 (83.2–88.5)
Boston, Massachusetts 5,902 87.1 0.6 (85.8–88.3)
Boulder, Colorado 515 90.5 1.5 (87.6–93.4)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 566 81.5 2.2 (77.2–85.8)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,180 86.0 1.1 (83.8–88.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,520 90.1 0.9 (88.4–91.9)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts 6,924 88.0 0.6 (86.9–89.2)
Camden, New Jersey 1,978 82.5 1.2 (80.2–84.8)
Canton-Massillon, Ohio 681 79.9 2.1 (75.8–84.0)
Casper, Wyoming 827 83.4 1.9 (79.6–87.1)
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 585 87.3 1.6 (84.2–90.4)
Charleston, West Virginia 771 74.4 1.8 (70.9–77.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,700 84.5 1.2 (82.2–86.8)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,515 82.6 1.0 (80.7–84.5)
Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia 631 75.7 2.7 (70.5–81.0)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 958 82.2 1.9 (78.4–86.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,725 83.6 1.0 (81.7–85.6)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 2,360 82.3 1.0 (80.3–84.3)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,948 87.7 0.9 (85.9–89.6)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,779 82.5 1.2 (80.2–84.9)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,157 87.3 1.1 (85.0–89.5)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,798 83.1 1.3 (80.5–85.6)
Columbus, Ohio 1,602 84.6 1.3 (82.0–87.1)
Concord, New Hampshire 704 86.8 1.6 (83.7–90.0)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas 899 83.3 1.5 (80.4–86.1)
Dayton, Ohio 855 81.5 1.7 (78.3–84.8)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 4,836 85.0 0.7 (83.6–86.3)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,156 87.0 1.2 (84.7–89.3)
Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Michigan 2,218 78.1 1.5 (75.3–81.0)
Dover, Delaware 1,439 82.1 1.4 (79.3–84.8)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 514 84.9 1.9 (81.1–88.7)
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina 790 84.6 1.6 (81.4–87.8)
El Paso, Texas 622 76.6 2.3 (72.0–81.1)
Eugene, Oregon 525 84.5 1.9 (80.8–88.1)
Fairbanks, Alaska 597 86.2 1.6 (83.0–89.4)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 937 90.5 1.2 (88.2–92.8)
Farmington, New Mexico 650 79.1 2.0 (75.2–82.9)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 503 83.6 2.0 (79.6–87.6)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 811 79.7 2.2 (75.4–84.0)
Fort Collins, Colorado 596 88.8 1.6 (85.6–91.9)
Fort Wayne, Indiana 534 82.3 2.1 (78.1–86.5)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas 722 84.3 1.8 (80.8–87.7)
Grand Island, Nebraska 853 85.4 1.6 (82.3–88.4)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 892 88.1 1.4 (85.4–90.8)
Great Falls, Montana 707 83.0 1.6 (79.8–86.2)
Greeley, Colorado 534 84.5 1.9 (80.8–88.2)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 805 81.5 1.6 (78.3–84.7)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,687 81.0 1.2 (78.6–83.4)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 742 76.4 1.9 (72.6–80.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 760 84.0 2.0 (80.2–87.9)
Harrisburg-Carlisle, Pennsylvania 659 85.9 1.7 (82.6–89.3)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,661 86.3 0.9 (84.6–88.0)
Heber, Utah 510 88.4 2.6 (83.2–93.5)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,348 84.7 1.4 (81.9–87.4)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 932 90.5 1.3 (88.0–93.0)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,139 80.9 1.5 (78.1–83.8)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,114 73.3 1.6 (70.2–76.4)
Huntsville, Alabama 614 78.8 2.3 (74.4–83.3)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 540 85.1 2.4 (80.3–89.9)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 2,182 81.0 1.1 (78.8–83.1)
Jackson, Mississippi 920 80.0 1.5 (77.0–83.0)
Jacksonville, Florida 518 81.4 2.5 (76.5–86.3)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,216 86.3 1.4 (83.6–89.1)
Kalispell, Montana 560 82.6 1.9 (78.8–86.3)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 4,733 84.0 1.0 (82.1–85.9)
Kapaa, Hawaii 669 83.4 2.2 (79.2–87.7)
Keene, New Hampshire 546 84.8 2.4 (80.0–89.5)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 535 80.8 2.2 (76.6–85.1)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 568 73.0 2.7 (67.8–78.2)
Knoxville, Tennessee 833 79.3 1.8 (75.8–82.9)
Laconia, New Hampshire 566 81.1 3.1 (75.0–87.3)
Lafayette, Louisiana 555 83.9 1.9 (80.2–87.5)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 706 71.2 2.3 (66.7–75.8)
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nevada 2,007 80.3 1.1 (78.1–82.5)
Lewiston-Auburn, Maine 695 81.6 1.9 (78.0–85.3)
Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 531 83.5 1.9 (79.8–87.2)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,667 87.9 1.0 (86.0–89.8)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,172 80.7 1.5 (77.8–83.5)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 504 90.1 1.7 (86.8–93.4)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California 3,502 78.4 1.0 (76.5–80.4)
Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 2,178 78.2 1.4 (75.5–80.8)
Lumberton, North Carolina 545 72.7 3.6 (65.7–79.8)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,903 87.2 0.9 (85.3–89.0)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas 614 71.9 2.8 (66.4–77.4)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,309 79.8 1.5 (76.9–82.7)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,659 81.0 1.4 (78.2–83.8)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,256 85.3 1.5 (82.3–88.2)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 7,887 89.2 0.5 (88.2–90.3)
Missoula, Montana 778 87.2 1.3 (84.6–89.8)
Mobile, Alabama 815 74.3 2.3 (69.7–78.9)
Montgomery, Alabama 534 78.5 2.3 (74.0–82.9)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania 1,311 87.5 1.2 (85.2–89.8)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 945 83.3 1.5 (80.3–86.2)
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,339 84.7 1.2 (82.3–87.0)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York 894 88.8 1.3 (86.3–91.3)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania 6,530 85.9 0.7 (84.6–87.2)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 2,006 84.2 1.2 (81.9–86.6)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 1,274 80.7 1.5 (77.8–83.5)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey 7,403 81.4 0.9 (79.6–83.1)
Norfolk, Nebraska 569 85.6 1.9 (81.9–89.2)
North Platte, Nebraska 613 85.6 1.9 (81.9–89.2)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 997 87.1 1.5 (84.2–89.9)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California 976 87.0 1.8 (83.6–90.5)
Ocean City, New Jersey 552 80.4 2.8 (74.9–85.9)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,423 87.1 0.8 (85.5–88.7)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,434 82.0 0.9 (80.1–83.8)
Olympia-Tumwater, Washington 515 81.1 2.4 (76.5–85.8)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 5,580 86.0 0.6 (84.7–87.2)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 566 76.8 2.8 (71.3–82.4)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2,431 81.6 1.0 (79.6–83.7)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 2,600 83.2 1.0 (81.2–85.2)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,351 83.4 0.8 (81.9–84.9)
Ponce, Puerto Rico 548 64.5 2.4 (59.8–69.2)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 3,314 86.6 0.8 (85.1–88.1)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,126 84.5 0.9 (82.8–86.3)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 8,116 83.5 0.6 (82.3–84.7)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,750 88.6 0.9 (86.8–90.5)
Raleigh, North Carolina 944 85.5 1.3 (82.9–88.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,051 85.8 1.4 (83.0–88.6)
Reno, Nevada 1,508 83.6 1.4 (80.8–86.3)
Richmond, Virginia 1,011 84.6 1.5 (81.7–87.6)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,529 81.8 1.3 (79.2–84.4)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire 1,671 86.9 1.1 (84.8–89.1)
Rutland, Vermont 596 84.9 1.9 (81.2–88.7)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 998 85.8 1.8 (82.3–89.4)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,065 83.6 1.1 (81.4–85.8)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,123 78.9 1.7 (75.6–82.2)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,598 85.8 0.7 (84.4–87.2)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 775 81.0 1.8 (77.5–84.6)
San Diego-Carlsbad, California 1,128 84.2 1.7 (81.0–87.5)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California 595 86.6 2.0 (82.7–90.4)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 684 88.2 1.8 (84.7–91.7)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,955 65.8 0.9 (64.1–67.5)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 691 83.6 1.7 (80.3–86.8)
Sayre, Pennsylvania 1,845 84.5 1.2 (82.2–86.8)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 629 80.3 2.6 (75.2–85.5)
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pennsylvania 738 82.9 1.8 (79.4–86.3)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington 5,095 86.2 0.7 (84.9–87.5)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 579 76.2 2.3 (71.7–80.7)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland 2,295 86.4 1.3 (83.9–88.9)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 1,203 82.0 2.3 (77.5–86.4)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,465 88.7 1.1 (86.6–90.8)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 706 77.2 2.3 (72.8–81.7)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,096 85.1 1.4 (82.4–87.8)
Springfield, Massachusetts 2,343 82.4 1.2 (80.0–84.7)
Tacoma-Lakewood, Washington 1,181 83.2 1.5 (80.4–86.1)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 823 81.0 2.1 (77.0–85.1)
Toledo, Ohio 972 81.2 1.8 (77.7–84.8)
Topeka, Kansas 1,086 82.9 1.5 (79.9–85.9)
Torrington, Connecticut 662 88.3 1.6 (85.1–91.5)
Trenton, New Jersey 576 86.1 1.8 (82.7–89.6)
Tucson, Arizona 999 81.2 1.9 (77.5–84.9)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,737 83.6 1.0 (81.6–85.6)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 580 73.4 3.0 (67.5–79.3)
Urban Honolulu, Hawaii 4,338 85.3 0.8 (83.7–86.9)
Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey 558 76.5 2.9 (70.9–82.2)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,501 82.8 1.3 (80.2–85.4)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan 2,183 86.5 0.9 (84.7–88.3)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia 8,178 86.5 0.7 (85.2–87.8)
Wichita, Kansas 2,355 84.8 1.0 (82.8–86.7)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey 3,230 85.1 0.9 (83.4–86.8)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 793 76.9 1.8 (73.3–80.5)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 2,841 87.3 0.9 (85.6–89.0)
Yakima, Washington 531 73.5 2.7 (68.3–78.8)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 926 79.5 2.1 (75.3–83.7)
Median 83.6
Range 62.7–90.5

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.
Metropolitan division.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 3. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who reported good or better health,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
County Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Jefferson County, Alabama 960 79.5 1.5 (76.6–82.5)
Madison County, Alabama 511 80.9 2.4 (76.2–85.7)
Mobile County, Alabama 815 74.3 2.3 (69.7–78.9)
Anchorage Municipality, Alaska 902 87.5 1.3 (85.0–90.0)
Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska 597 86.2 1.6 (83.0–89.4)
Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska 599 82.3 1.9 (78.6–86.0)
Maricopa County, Arizona 2,119 83.2 1.1 (81.1–85.3)
Pima County, Arizona 999 81.2 1.9 (77.6–84.9)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 749 82.9 1.8 (79.4–86.3)
Alameda County, California 619 86.2 2.5 (81.3–91.0)
Los Angeles County, California 3,502 78.4 1.0 (76.5–80.4)
Orange County, California 1,037 87.0 1.4 (84.3–89.7)
Riverside County, California 824 79.7 1.9 (75.9–83.4)
Sacramento County, California 609 82.4 2.5 (77.5–87.3)
San Bernardino County, California 705 84.8 1.8 (81.3–88.3)
San Diego County, California 1,128 84.2 1.7 (81.0–87.5)
Santa Clara County, California 665 88.3 1.8 (84.7–91.9)
Adams County, Colorado 804 79.1 1.9 (75.4–82.7)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 853 85.7 1.4 (83.0–88.5)
Boulder County, Colorado 515 90.5 1.5 (87.6–93.4)
Denver County, Colorado 998 82.1 1.4 (79.2–84.9)
Douglas County, Colorado 545 92.4 1.6 (89.3–95.5)
El Paso County, Colorado 1,017 87.3 1.2 (85.0–89.6)
Jefferson County, Colorado 1,114 88.7 1.2 (86.5–91.0)
Larimer County, Colorado 596 88.8 1.6 (85.6–91.9)
Weld County, Colorado 534 84.5 1.9 (80.8–88.2)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,180 86.0 1.1 (83.8–88.2)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,979 85.3 1.0 (83.2–87.3)
Litchfield County, Connecticut 662 88.3 1.6 (85.1–91.5)
New Haven County, Connecticut 2,006 84.2 1.2 (81.9–86.6)
New London County, Connecticut 997 87.1 1.5 (84.2–89.9)
Kent County, Delaware 1,439 82.1 1.4 (79.3–84.8)
New Castle County, Delaware 2,331 85.6 1.0 (83.7–87.5)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,398 79.9 1.5 (77.0–82.8)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,809 87.9 0.8 (86.4–89.4)
Broward County, Florida 523 83.4 2.2 (79.0–87.8)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 812 78.4 2.2 (74.0–82.8)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,348 84.7 1.4 (81.9–87.4)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 4,338 85.3 0.8 (83.7–86.9)
Kauai County, Hawaii 669 83.4 2.2 (79.2–87.7)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,216 86.3 1.4 (83.6–89.1)
Ada County, Idaho 808 87.5 1.7 (84.2–90.7)
Canyon County, Idaho 502 81.3 2.8 (75.9–86.7)
Cook County, Illinois 1,503 82.5 1.4 (79.8–85.3)
Lake County, Indiana 883 76.6 2.6 (71.5–81.7)
Marion County, Indiana 1,269 80.4 1.4 (77.6–83.2)
Polk County, Iowa 805 87.0 1.4 (84.2–89.7)
Johnson County, Kansas 2,175 90.2 0.9 (88.4–91.9)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,794 84.1 1.1 (81.9–86.3)
Shawnee County, Kansas 768 82.5 1.8 (79.0–86.1)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 871 71.5 2.8 (66.0–77.0)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 1,693 76.9 1.8 (73.4–80.3)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 573 80.9 2.2 (76.5–85.3)
Androscoggin County, Maine 695 81.6 1.9 (78.0–85.3)
Aroostook County, Maine 537 77.6 2.1 (73.5–81.6)
Cumberland County, Maine 1,753 87.1 1.0 (85.0–89.1)
Kennebec County, Maine 830 82.2 1.6 (79.1–85.4)
Penobscot County, Maine 920 82.4 1.6 (79.2–85.6)
York County, Maine 1,187 86.6 1.2 (84.2–89.0)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 894 85.5 1.7 (82.2–88.8)
Baltimore County, Maryland 1,521 83.3 1.4 (80.6–86.0)
Charles County, Maryland 512 83.2 2.8 (77.6–88.8)
Frederick County, Maryland 755 85.8 2.5 (80.9–90.7)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,540 86.4 1.5 (83.5–89.3)
Prince George´s County, Maryland 1,142 85.2 1.8 (81.7–88.7)
Washington County, Maryland 538 85.5 2.5 (80.5–90.5)
Baltimore city, Maryland 743 76.9 2.4 (72.2–81.6)
Barnstable County, Massachusetts 557 88.4 1.7 (85.0–91.7)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,648 82.2 1.2 (79.8–84.6)
Essex County, Massachusetts 2,565 85.8 1.1 (83.6–87.9)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,961 81.3 1.3 (78.8–83.8)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 4,359 89.1 0.7 (87.8–90.4)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 1,758 90.7 1.0 (88.8–92.7)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 1,833 85.9 1.3 (83.4–88.5)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 2,311 84.4 1.1 (82.2–86.6)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 2,596 87.6 0.9 (85.8–89.3)
Kent County, Michigan 525 89.8 1.6 (86.7–93.0)
Macomb County, Michigan 612 85.5 1.6 (82.3–88.6)
Oakland County, Michigan 1,168 89.0 1.1 (86.8–91.2)
Wayne County, Michigan 2,218 78.1 1.4 (75.3–81.0)
Anoka County, Minnesota 545 90.1 1.4 (87.4–92.8)
Dakota County, Minnesota 672 90.5 1.5 (87.6–93.4)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 3,297 90.0 0.8 (88.3–91.6)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 1,941 86.5 1.4 (83.7–89.3)
Jackson County, Missouri 881 81.1 2.1 (76.9–85.3)
St. Louis County, Missouri 950 84.8 1.5 (81.8–87.8)
Cascade County, Montana 707 83.0 1.6 (79.8–86.2)
Flathead County, Montana 560 82.6 1.9 (78.8–86.3)
Hill County, Montana 584 79.7 2.6 (74.5–84.9)
Lake County, Montana 899 79.7 2.1 (75.6–83.9)
Missoula County, Montana 778 87.2 1.3 (84.6–89.8)
Yellowstone County, Montana 749 85.1 1.4 (82.3–87.8)
Dakota County, Nebraska 732 75.6 4.5 (66.8–84.5)
Douglas County, Nebraska 3,567 83.8 0.8 (82.3–85.4)
Hall County, Nebraska 533 84.8 2.0 (80.8–88.7)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 1,445 88.0 1.0 (86.0–90.0)
Lincoln County, Nebraska 589 85.5 1.9 (81.8–89.2)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 1,175 91.6 0.9 (89.7–93.4)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 576 79.5 2.7 (74.2–84.8)
Clark County, Nevada 2,007 80.3 1.1 (78.1–82.5)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,489 83.6 1.4 (80.8–86.4)
Belknap County, New Hampshire 566 81.1 3.1 (75.0–87.3)
Carroll County, New Hampshire 528 86.1 2.5 (81.2–91.1)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 546 84.8 2.4 (80.1–89.5)
Coos County, New Hampshire 539 79.5 2.9 (73.8–85.2)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 566 89.0 1.5 (86.1–91.9)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,903 87.2 0.9 (85.3–89.0)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 704 86.8 1.6 (83.7–90.0)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,050 88.3 1.3 (85.6–90.9)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 621 83.9 1.9 (80.1–87.7)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 1,021 83.5 1.5 (80.6–86.5)
Bergen County, New Jersey 1,009 86.7 1.3 (84.1–89.3)
Burlington County, New Jersey 684 83.4 2.0 (79.6–87.3)
Camden County, New Jersey 744 78.7 2.1 (74.5–82.8)
Cape May County, New Jersey 552 80.4 2.8 (74.9–85.9)
Cumberland County, New Jersey 558 76.5 2.9 (70.9–82.2)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,336 81.3 1.3 (78.7–84.0)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 550 86.5 1.8 (83.0–90.0)
Hudson County, New Jersey 1,303 78.3 1.5 (75.4–81.2)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 571 91.5 1.4 (88.8–94.3)
Mercer County, New Jersey 576 86.1 1.8 (82.7–89.6)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 880 86.5 1.4 (83.7–89.3)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 710 86.4 1.7 (83.1–89.8)
Morris County, New Jersey 848 89.9 1.3 (87.4–92.4)
Ocean County, New Jersey 662 83.2 1.8 (79.7–86.6)
Passaic County, New Jersey 688 75.6 2.3 (71.1–80.1)
Salem County, New Jersey 583 77.1 3.3 (70.7–83.5)
Somerset County, New Jersey 638 91.3 1.5 (88.3–94.3)
Sussex County, New Jersey 546 85.3 2.2 (81.1–89.6)
Union County, New Jersey 711 84.3 1.6 (81.1–87.5)
Warren County, New Jersey 532 83.5 2.8 (78.0–89.0)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 2,062 83.4 1.0 (81.4–85.3)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 706 71.2 2.3 (66.7–75.8)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 656 84.5 1.8 (81.0–88.0)
San Juan County, New Mexico 650 79.1 2.0 (75.2–82.9)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 691 83.6 1.7 (80.3–86.8)
Kings County, New York 490 83.0 2.3 (78.5–87.6)
Guilford County, North Carolina 511 87.8 1.6 (84.6–91.0)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 726 83.9 1.6 (80.9–87.0)
Robeson County, North Carolina 545 72.7 3.6 (65.7–79.8)
Wake County, North Carolina 700 88.1 1.4 (85.2–90.9)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 563 86.0 1.9 (82.3–89.7)
Cass County, North Dakota 841 90.3 1.3 (87.7–92.8)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 868 80.0 1.6 (76.8–83.2)
Franklin County, Ohio 837 84.6 1.8 (81.1–88.0)
Hamilton County, Ohio 772 82.1 1.7 (78.8–85.5)
Lorain County, Ohio 612 85.7 1.9 (81.9–89.6)
Lucas County, Ohio 623 78.6 2.4 (73.9–83.3)
Mahoning County, Ohio 590 81.5 2.5 (76.7–86.3)
Montgomery County, Ohio 663 80.8 1.9 (77.1–84.6)
Stark County, Ohio 623 80.1 2.2 (75.9–84.4)
Summit County, Ohio 631 78.0 2.4 (73.3–82.6)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,188 80.9 1.3 (78.4–83.4)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,200 86.8 1.1 (84.6–88.9)
Clackamas County, Oregon 511 83.5 2.6 (78.5–88.5)
Lane County, Oregon 525 84.5 1.9 (80.8–88.1)
Multnomah County, Oregon 895 83.6 1.7 (80.3–87.0)
Washington County, Oregon 619 85.6 2.0 (81.8–89.4)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 1,882 85.1 1.0 (83.1–87.0)
Bradford County, Pennsylvania 1,845 84.5 1.2 (82.2–86.8)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 546 90.6 1.3 (88.0–93.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 2,041 79.0 1.2 (76.5–81.4)
Pike County, Pennsylvania 1,880 86.0 1.3 (83.5–88.6)
Kent County, Rhode Island 812 85.2 1.7 (81.9–88.5)
Providence County, Rhode Island 3,338 81.1 0.9 (79.3–82.9)
Washington County, Rhode Island 657 89.9 1.7 (86.4–93.3)
Aiken County, South Carolina 554 80.3 2.1 (76.1–84.5)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 800 91.8 1.2 (89.4–94.2)
Charleston County, South Carolina 1,010 85.3 1.6 (82.2–88.3)
Greenville County, South Carolina 904 82.7 1.6 (79.5–85.9)
Horry County, South Carolina 776 84.6 1.5 (81.6–87.6)
Richland County, South Carolina 963 84.6 1.7 (81.3–88.0)
Spartanburg County, South Carolina 652 79.4 2.3 (75.0–83.8)
Lincoln County, South Dakota 500 90.2 2.1 (86.0–94.4)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 878 87.6 1.3 (85.0–90.2)
Pennington County, South Dakota 604 86.4 1.6 (83.2–89.5)
Davidson County, Tennessee 555 85.6 1.8 (82.0–89.2)
Shelby County, Tennessee 537 83.2 1.9 (79.6–86.8)
Bexar County, Texas 582 79.9 2.2 (75.6–84.1)
Dallas County, Texas 508 79.6 2.2 (75.4–83.8)
El Paso County, Texas 621 76.5 2.3 (71.9–81.1)
Harris County, Texas 771 78.6 1.9 (75.0–82.3)
Hidalgo County, Texas 614 71.9 2.8 (66.4–77.4)
Tarrant County, Texas 567 84.1 2.0 (80.1–88.1)
Travis County, Texas 1,042 84.3 2.0 (80.5–88.1)
Davis County, Utah 1,144 89.6 1.0 (87.6–91.6)
Salt Lake County, Utah 4,033 85.7 0.7 (84.3–87.2)
Tooele County, Utah 565 87.3 2.0 (83.3–91.2)
Utah County, Utah 1,682 88.6 1.0 (86.7–90.5)
Wasatch County, Utah 510 88.4 2.6 (83.2–93.5)
Weber County, Utah 1,045 83.9 1.4 (81.1–86.7)
Chittenden County, Vermont 918 92.0 1.0 (90.0–94.0)
Rutland County, Vermont 596 84.9 1.9 (81.2–88.7)
Washington County, Vermont 515 89.5 1.7 (86.2–92.8)
Windsor County, Vermont 545 89.0 1.6 (85.9–92.1)
Fairfax County, Virginia 742 88.7 1.7 (85.4–92.1)
Clark County, Washington 789 85.7 1.4 (82.9–88.5)
King County, Washington 3,923 87.0 0.8 (85.5–88.6)
Kitsap County, Washington 566 81.5 2.2 (77.2–85.8)
Pierce County, Washington 1,181 83.2 1.4 (80.4–86.1)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,172 83.7 1.5 (80.8–86.6)
Spokane County, Washington 950 85.4 1.5 (82.5–88.3)
Thurston County, Washington 515 81.1 2.4 (76.5–85.8)
Whatcom County, Washington 846 88.0 1.4 (85.3–90.7)
Yakima County, Washington 531 73.5 2.7 (68.3–78.8)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 640 76.1 1.9 (72.4–79.9)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 963 83.2 1.8 (79.7–86.7)
Laramie County, Wyoming 958 82.2 1.9 (78.4–86.0)
Natrona County, Wyoming 827 83.4 1.9 (79.6–87.1)
San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico 667 68.1 2.1 (63.9–72.3)
Median 84.4
Range 68.1–92.4

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Respondents were asked to rate general health as poor, fair, good, very good, or excellent. Respondents were classified into two groups: those who reported fair or poor health and those with good, very good, or excellent health.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 4. Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health care coverage,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 5,768 76.5 0.9 (74.8–78.2)
Alaska 3,487 80.1 1.0 (78.3–82.0)
Arizona Alaska 4,297 75.3 1.1 (73.2–77.4)
Arkansas 3,167 68.9 1.1 (66.7–71.1)
California 10,219 74.9 0.6 (73.7–76.1)
Colorado 8,532 78.6 0.6 (77.3–79.8)
Connecticut 5,900 87.2 0.6 (86.0–88.4)
Delaware 3,412 86.1 0.9 (84.3–87.9)
District of Columbia 2,479 90.2 1.0 (88.4–92.1)
Florida 4,436 72.4 1.0 (70.4–74.4)
Georgia 4,099 72.7 1.0 (70.7–74.6)
Hawaii 5,505 87.3 0.7 (85.9–88.7)
Idaho 3,630 76.6 1.2 (74.2–78.9)
Illinois 3,586 80.0 1.0 (78.0–82.1)
Indiana 5,795 78.2 0.7 (76.8–79.7)
Iowa 4,578 86.6 0.7 (85.3–87.9)
Kansas 7,753 79.5 0.7 (78.2–80.8)
Kentucky 7,680 79.1 0.7 (77.6–80.6)
Louisiana 5,769 74.3 0.9 (72.5–76.2)
Maine 6,656 84.3 0.6 (83.1–85.4)
Maryland 8,404 84.3 0.8 (82.8–85.8)
Massachusetts 14,920 93.1 0.3 (92.4–93.7)
Michigan 6,820 83.4 0.6 (82.2–84.7)
Minnesota 8,646 86.8 0.5 (85.8–87.8)
Mississippi 4,869 72.7 0.9 (70.9–74.5)
Missouri 4,245 79.7 0.9 (77.9–81.4)
Montana 5,776 76.8 0.7 (75.4–78.2)
Nebraska 12,310 82.0 0.5 (81.0–83.0)
Nevada 3,191 69.8 1.2 (67.5–72.1)
New Hampshire 4,780 84.2 0.8 (82.6–85.7)
New Jersey 11,036 81.4 0.5 (80.4–82.5)
New Mexico 6,060 73.2 0.7 (71.8–74.7)
New York 4,231 81.4 0.9 (79.6–83.2)
North Carolina 8,064 74.6 0.6 (73.4–75.8)
North Dakota 3,240 84.0 0.9 (82.1–85.8)
Ohio 8,810 82.2 0.6 (81.1–83.4)
Oklahoma 5,364 77.9 0.8 (76.5–79.4)
Oregon 3,387 76.7 1.0 (74.8–78.7)
Pennsylvania 13,020 83.8 0.5 (82.8–84.8)
Rhode Island 3,711 81.6 0.9 (79.8–83.4)
South Carolina 8,211 73.5 0.7 (72.1–74.9)
South Dakota 5,432 86.2 0.7 (84.8–87.6)
Tennessee 4,616 78.1 0.9 (76.3–79.8)
Texas 6,311 64.2 0.8 (62.6–65.9)
Utah 8,924 79.6 0.6 (78.4–80.8)
Vermont 4,011 88.1 0.7 (86.7–89.5)
Virginia 5,033 81.8 0.8 (80.3–83.3)
Washington 10,135 78.8 0.6 (77.6–79.9)
West Virginia 3,665 75.8 0.9 (74.0–77.5)
Wisconsin 3,608 85.3 0.9 (83.5–87.1)
Wyoming 3,762 75.2 1.2 (72.9–77.5)
Guam 1,778 73.4 1.4 (70.6–76.2)
Puerto Rico 4,417 90.2 0.6 (89.1–91.3)
Median 79.6
Range 64.2–93.1

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).

Return to your place in the textTABLE 5. Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health care coverage,* by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
MMSA(s) Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico 390 92.3 1.6 (89.2–95.4)
Akron, Ohio 503 79.1 2.7 (73.8–84.5)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 2,318 76.4 1.1 (74.2–78.7)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 902 89.1 1.5 (86.2–92.0)
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California 705 82.4 1.8 (78.9–86.0)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,239 80.9 1.4 (78.2–83.6)
Asheville, North Carolina 364 72.1 3.0 (66.2–78.0)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 1,809 74.2 1.5 (71.4–77.1)
Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey 655 78.6 2.3 (74.1–83.2)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 657 74.3 3.2 (68.1–80.5)
Augusta-Waterville, Maine 599 86.4 1.8 (82.9–89.9)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 964 71.9 2.4 (67.2–76.6)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 3,212 86.2 1.1 (84.1–88.3)
Bangor, Maine 663 80.9 2.1 (76.7–85.0)
Barnstable Town, Massachusetts 280 91.8 2.1 (87.7–96.0)
Barre, Vermont 377 87.9 2.3 (83.3–92.5)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 887 79.7 2.1 (75.5–83.9)
Bellingham, Washington 550 77.2 3.2 (70.9–83.5)
Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont 422 72.4 3.5 (65.5–79.2)
Billings, Montana 580 80.0 1.8 (76.4–83.6)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,216 77.4 1.7 (74.0–80.8)
Bismarck, North Dakota 557 88.1 2.1 (83.9–92.3)
Boise City, Idaho 957 76.3 2.1 (72.2–80.4)
Boston, Massachusetts 4,103 93.4 0.6 (92.3–94.6)
Boulder, Colorado 381 79.3 2.8 (73.7–84.9)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 357 81.8 3.0 (75.8–87.7)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 1,525 83.5 1.5 (80.7–86.4)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,089 91.3 1.0 (89.2–93.3)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts 4,881 93.7 0.6 (92.6–94.8)
Camden, New Jersey 1,385 86.6 1.4 (83.9–89.3)
Canton-Massillon, Ohio 445 83.9 2.6 (78.8–89.1)
Casper, Wyoming 485 74.7 3.0 (68.8–80.7)
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 375 89.5 2.1 (85.4–93.6)
Charleston, West Virginia 527 76.7 2.3 (72.1–81.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,145 77.7 1.7 (74.4–80.9)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 1,789 76.3 1.2 (73.9–78.8)
Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia 397 77.9 3.3 (71.4–84.4)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 546 81.2 2.6 (76.0–86.4)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 2,547 78.8 1.3 (76.3–81.3)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 1,680 84.5 1.2 (82.2–86.9)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,217 84.6 1.6 (81.5–87.8)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,197 83.4 1.5 (80.4–86.3)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 849 80.9 1.7 (77.5–84.4)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,241 75.4 1.8 (71.9–79.0)
Columbus, Ohio 1,176 82.9 1.4 (80.2–85.7)
Concord, New Hampshire 457 85.2 2.1 (81.0–89.4)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas 681 63.9 2.3 (59.3–68.4)
Dayton, Ohio 562 80.2 2.3 (75.7–84.8)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 3,575 79.0 0.9 (77.3–80.8)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 784 89.5 1.4 (86.8–92.2)
Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Michigan 1,416 77.9 1.7 (74.6–81.2)
Dover, Delaware 939 87.3 1.7 (84.0–90.7)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 351 86.1 2.6 (81.0–91.3)
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina 580 72.8 2.3 (68.2–77.3)
El Paso, Texas 421 52.1 3.8 (44.7–59.4)
Eugene, Oregon 338 74.8 3.2 (68.5–81.0)
Fairbanks, Alaska 486 83.7 2.3 (79.2–88.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 662 82.2 2.2 (78.0–86.5)
Farmington, New Mexico 458 76.9 2.4 (72.1–81.7)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 369 78.6 3.0 (72.7–84.5)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 506 67.0 3.3 (60.5–73.6)
Fort Collins, Colorado 407 80.9 2.5 (76.0–85.7)
Fort Wayne, Indiana 377 73.6 3.0 (67.7–79.5)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas 495 70.7 2.7 (65.5–76.0)
Grand Island, Nebraska 533 81.2 2.7 (76.0–86.4)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 616 87.7 1.7 (84.4–91.0)
Great Falls, Montana 441 77.0 2.6 (72.0–82.0)
Greeley, Colorado 399 75.9 2.7 (70.5–81.2)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 544 74.3 2.4 (69.6–79.0)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,116 72.6 1.8 (69.1–76.1)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 475 75.1 2.6 (70.1–80.1)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 488 81.3 3.0 (75.5–87.1)
Harrisburg-Carlisle, Pennsylvania 465 83.2 2.3 (78.7–87.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 1,792 89.4 1.0 (87.6–91.3)
Heber, Utah 347 72.3 5.5 (61.6–82.9)
Hilo, Hawaii 951 83.9 1.8 (80.5–87.4)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 430 64.1 4.6 (55.1–73.2)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 903 64.1 2.0 (60.3–68.0)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 756 78.9 2.1 (74.9–83.0)
Huntsville, Alabama 451 81.3 2.4 (76.6–86.1)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 353 83.0 3.3 (76.5–89.5)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 1,523 82.6 1.2 (80.2–85.0)
Jackson, Mississippi 630 73.5 2.2 (69.2–77.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 340 80.8 2.9 (75.1–86.6)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 842 87.0 1.6 (83.9–90.2)
Kalispell, Montana 374 74.4 2.5 (69.5–79.3)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 3,144 83.7 1.2 (81.4–86.0)
Kapaa, Hawaii 434 88.9 2.1 (84.8–93.1)
Keene, New Hampshire 319 80.1 3.4 (73.4–86.8)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 372 73.0 3.1 (67.0–79.1)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 358 79.3 3.4 (72.7–85.9)
Knoxville, Tennessee 552 80.7 2.2 (76.4–85.0)
Laconia, New Hampshire 320 81.9 3.6 (74.8–89.0)
Lafayette, Louisiana 386 72.6 3.0 (66.7–78.5)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 489 65.4 2.8 (60.0–70.8)
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nevada 1,458 69.4 1.5 (66.5–72.3)
Lewiston-Auburn, Maine 505 86.6 1.8 (83.0–90.2)
Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 399 84.7 2.3 (80.2–89.2)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,287 82.7 1.3 (80.2–85.2)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 779 75.9 2.1 (71.8–80.1)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 370 82.5 2.7 (77.2–87.8)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California 2,609 68.3 1.3 (65.9–70.8)
Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 1,466 79.9 1.6 (76.7–83.0)
Lumberton, North Carolina 376 65.9 5.0 (56.2–75.7)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,332 84.8 1.5 (82.0–87.7)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas 420 35.4 3.4 (28.8–42.1)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 865 76.9 2.0 (73.0–80.9)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,028 67.9 2.1 (63.8–72.0)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 912 85.6 1.8 (82.1–89.0)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 5,704 87.3 0.7 (86.0–88.6)
Missoula, Montana 547 73.4 2.4 (68.7–78.1)
Mobile, Alabama 501 73.5 3.1 (67.3–79.6)
Montgomery, Alabama 350 78.8 3.1 (72.8–84.9)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania 940 88.2 1.7 (84.9–91.4)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 583 68.4 2.6 (63.3–73.6)
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 981 82.0 1.7 (78.7–85.4)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York 612 83.1 2.2 (78.8–87.4)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania 4,414 80.5 1.0 (78.6–82.4)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,341 86.6 1.3 (84.1–89.1)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 862 76.1 2.1 (72.1–80.1)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey 5,525 78.3 1.1 (76.2–80.5)
Norfolk, Nebraska 367 76.3 3.5 (69.5–83.1)
North Platte, Nebraska 349 82.4 3.0 (76.6–88.2)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 629 90.2 1.6 (87.1–93.4)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California 672 86.3 2.1 (82.2–90.5)
Ocean City, New Jersey 298 81.9 4.5 (73.0–90.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 1,750 85.3 1.1 (83.1–87.5)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1,791 78.7 1.2 (76.3–81.1)
Olympia-Tumwater, Washington 349 85.6 2.5 (80.7–90.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 3,991 82.9 0.8 (81.3–84.5)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 348 73.0 3.4 (66.5–79.6)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1,715 79.4 1.4 (76.7–82.1)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 1,697 75.3 1.4 (72.6–78.1)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2,167 85.9 1.0 (84.0–87.8)
Ponce, Puerto Rico 389 91.0 1.7 (87.6–94.4)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 2,235 86.8 0.9 (85.0–88.6)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 2,141 81.5 1.2 (79.1–83.8)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 5,446 85.1 0.8 (83.6–86.6)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,339 79.5 1.4 (76.7–82.2)
Raleigh, North Carolina 753 78.3 1.8 (74.8–81.9)
Rapid City, South Dakota 741 87.1 1.5 (84.1–90.1)
Reno, Nevada 968 71.1 2.2 (66.8–75.4)
Richmond, Virginia 666 84.3 2.0 (80.5–88.1)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,078 72.6 1.8 (69.0–76.2)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire 1,098 86.2 1.5 (83.3–89.1)
Rutland, Vermont 390 84.8 2.8 (79.2–90.3)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 707 81.2 2.2 (76.9–85.5)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 1,374 83.4 1.4 (80.6–86.3)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 1,209 86.0 1.5 (83.0–89.0)
Salt Lake City, Utah 3,361 77.6 1.0 (75.6–79.7)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 525 68.3 2.7 (63.0–73.6)
San Diego-Carlsbad, California 787 77.1 2.1 (72.9–81.3)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California 416 84.5 2.4 (79.8–89.2)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 496 82.6 2.3 (78.0–87.1)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 2,783 89.5 0.7 (88.1–91.0)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 482 65.9 2.7 (60.6–71.2)
Sayre, Pennsylvania 1,127 75.9 4.1 (67.8–84.0)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 356 76.4 3.8 (68.9–83.9)
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pennsylvania 459 82.1 3.1 (76.0–88.3)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington 3,603 82.4 0.9 (80.7–84.1)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 373 74.5 3.2 (68.3–80.7)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland 1,553 83.0 1.8 (79.4–86.6)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 734 82.4 2.8 (77.0–87.8)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,149 85.9 1.4 (83.1–88.7)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 460 74.9 2.9 (69.1–80.6)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 710 77.5 2.2 (73.3–81.7)
Springfield, Massachusetts 1,627 92.3 1.0 (90.3–94.2)
Tacoma-Lakewood, Washington 844 77.8 1.9 (74.1–81.6)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 498 76.7 2.6 (71.6–81.8)
Toledo, Ohio 645 82.1 2.9 (76.5–87.8)
Topeka, Kansas 745 78.8 2.2 (74.4–83.1)
Torrington, Connecticut 443 88.7 2.1 (84.6–92.9)
Trenton, New Jersey 414 85.1 2.3 (80.7–89.6)
Tucson, Arizona 596 79.7 2.3 (75.2–84.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,191 79.3 1.5 (76.4–82.2)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 378 70.9 4.3 (62.5–79.3)
Urban Honolulu, Hawaii 3,278 87.8 0.9 (86.0–89.7)
Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey 384 74.2 4.1 (66.2–82.1)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,023 80.4 1.8 (76.9–83.9)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan 1,477 85.7 1.2 (83.3–88.1)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia 5,695 84.5 0.9 (82.7–86.3)
Wichita, Kansas 1,586 76.4 1.5 (73.5–79.4)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey 2,287 85.6 1.3 (83.0–88.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 522 73.4 2.5 (68.6–78.3)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 1,992 91.8 1.0 (89.9–93.8)
Yakima, Washington 357 63.5 3.5 (56.5–70.4)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 573 81.3 2.8 (75.9–86.8)
Median 80.7
Range 35.4–93.7

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
*Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).
Metropolitan division.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 6. Estimated prevalence of adults aged 18–64 years who have health care coverage,* by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
County Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Jefferson County, Alabama 668 77.3 2.2 (73.0–81.6)
Madison County, Alabama 376 81.8 2.5 (76.9–86.7)
Mobile County, Alabama 501 73.5 3.1 (67.3–79.6)
Anchorage Municipality, Alaska 754 81.6 1.7 (78.3–84.9)
Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska 486 83.7 2.3 (79.2–88.2)
Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska 485 78.4 2.3 (73.8–82.9)
Maricopa County, Arizona 1,446 75.6 1.5 (72.7–78.6)
Pima County, Arizona 596 79.7 2.3 (75.2–84.2)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 489 75.4 3.0 (69.5–81.3)
Alameda County, California 434 86.4 2.5 (81.4–91.4)
Los Angeles County, California 2,609 68.3 1.3 (65.9–70.8)
Orange County, California 705 82.4 1.8 (78.9–86.0)
Riverside County, California 550 72.7 2.5 (67.7–77.7)
Sacramento County, California 440 80.1 2.9 (74.5–85.8)
San Bernardino County, California 528 72.6 2.6 (67.4–77.8)
San Diego County, California 787 77.1 2.1 (72.9–81.3)
Santa Clara County, California 487 82.7 2.4 (78.1–87.3)
Adams County, Colorado 589 69.6 2.6 (64.6–74.6)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 635 79.7 2.0 (75.7–83.7)
Boulder County, Colorado 381 79.3 2.8 (73.7–84.9)
Denver County, Colorado 750 74.2 1.9 (70.5–78.0)
Douglas County, Colorado 429 92.2 1.8 (88.7–95.8)
El Paso County, Colorado 763 80.9 1.8 (77.4–84.5)
Jefferson County, Colorado 789 84.5 1.6 (81.3–87.7)
Larimer County, Colorado 407 80.9 2.5 (76.0–85.7)
Weld County, Colorado 399 75.9 2.7 (70.5–81.2)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 1,525 83.5 1.5 (80.7–86.4)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,341 88.8 1.2 (86.5–91.1)
Litchfield County, Connecticut 443 88.7 2.1 (84.6–92.9)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,341 86.6 1.3 (84.1–89.1)
New London County, Connecticut 629 90.2 1.6 (87.1–93.4)
Kent County, Delaware 939 87.3 1.7 (84.0–90.7)
New Castle County, Delaware 1,677 86.8 1.2 (84.4–89.2)
Sussex County, Delaware 796 82.6 2.0 (78.6–86.6)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 2,479 90.2 1.0 (88.3–92.1)
Broward County, Florida 335 73.7 3.4 (67.0–80.5)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 528 60.7 3.2 (54.4–67.0)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 951 83.9 1.8 (80.5–87.4)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 3,278 87.8 0.9 (86.0–89.7)
Kauai County, Hawaii 434 88.9 2.1 (84.8–93.1)
Maui County, Hawaii 842 87.0 1.6 (83.9–90.2)
Ada County, Idaho 542 81.6 2.4 (76.8–86.3)
Canyon County, Idaho 306 66.8 4.2 (58.5–75.0)
Cook County, Illinois 1,037 76.3 1.8 (72.7–79.9)
Lake County, Indiana 564 74.2 3.3 (67.7–80.7)
Marion County, Indiana 874 79.7 1.8 (76.2–83.2)
Polk County, Iowa 556 88.2 1.7 (84.9–91.6)
Johnson County, Kansas 1,502 88.4 1.2 (86.0–90.8)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,241 74.8 1.7 (71.5–78.2)
Shawnee County, Kansas 524 80.7 2.4 (76.0–85.4)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 542 59.8 3.7 (52.4–67.1)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 1,099 79.3 2.0 (75.3–83.3)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 388 82.6 2.6 (77.5–87.7)
Androscoggin County, Maine 505 86.6 1.8 (83.0–90.2)
Aroostook County, Maine 360 83.8 2.4 (79.1–88.6)
Cumberland County, Maine 1,217 87.9 1.2 (85.6–90.3)
Kennebec County, Maine 599 86.4 1.8 (82.9–89.9)
Penobscot County, Maine 663 80.9 2.1 (76.7–85.0)
York County, Maine 774 85.8 1.6 (82.7–88.9)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 621 85.2 2.5 (80.3–90.1)
Baltimore County, Maryland 1,033 86.2 1.7 (82.9–89.6)
Charles County, Maryland 378 84.4 3.7 (77.1–91.7)
Frederick County, Maryland 497 84.9 3.9 (77.3–92.6)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,056 82.4 2.1 (78.4–86.5)
Prince George´s County, Maryland 801 79.1 2.7 (73.8–84.3)
Washington County, Maryland 330 83.4 4.2 (75.2–91.7)
Baltimore city, Maryland 497 80.5 2.9 (74.8–86.1)
Barnstable County, Massachusetts 280 91.8 2.1 (87.7–96.0)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 1,735 92.2 1.2 (89.8–94.7)
Essex County, Massachusetts 1,678 94.2 1.0 (92.3–96.1)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,350 91.0 1.3 (88.6–93.5)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 3,203 93.7 0.7 (92.4–95.0)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 1,206 96.7 0.8 (95.1–98.2)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 1,217 91.8 1.2 (89.4–94.2)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1,680 92.3 0.9 (90.5–94.1)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 1,822 92.2 1.1 (90.1–94.3)
Kent County, Michigan 368 88.0 2.3 (83.4–92.6)
Macomb County, Michigan 417 88.6 1.8 (85.1–92.0)
Oakland County, Michigan 768 84.5 1.8 (80.9–88.1)
Wayne County, Michigan 1,416 77.9 1.7 (74.6–81.2)
Anoka County, Minnesota 421 89.5 1.9 (85.8–93.3)
Dakota County, Minnesota 512 91.0 1.5 (88.1–93.8)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 2,386 86.6 1.0 (84.6–88.6)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 1,309 84.3 2.3 (79.7–88.8)
Jackson County, Missouri 551 81.9 2.6 (76.7–87.0)
St. Louis County, Missouri 636 80.2 2.2 (75.8–84.7)
Cascade County, Montana 441 77.0 2.6 (72.0–82.0)
Flathead County, Montana 374 74.4 2.5 (69.5–79.3)
Hill County, Montana 394 73.8 4.0 (65.9–81.7)
Lake County, Montana 544 69.2 3.4 (62.5–75.8)
Missoula County, Montana 547 73.4 2.4 (68.7–78.1)
Yellowstone County, Montana 520 80.0 1.9 (76.3–83.7)
Dakota County, Nebraska 436 66.9 5.8 (55.5–78.2)
Douglas County, Nebraska 2,543 81.4 1.0 (79.5–83.3)
Hall County, Nebraska 340 79.2 3.3 (72.7–85.8)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 1,143 82.5 1.3 (79.9–85.1)
Lincoln County, Nebraska 335 82.1 3.1 (76.1–88.0)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 860 88.9 1.5 (86.0–91.8)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 325 77.3 3.8 (69.9–84.7)
Clark County, Nevada 1,458 69.4 1.5 (66.5–72.3)
Washoe County, Nevada 957 71.2 2.2 (66.9–75.5)
Belknap County, New Hampshire 320 81.9 3.6 (74.8–89.0)
Carroll County, New Hampshire 279 80.2 3.5 (73.2–87.2)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 319 80.1 3.4 (73.4–86.8)
Coos County, New Hampshire 317 68.7 4.2 (60.5–76.9)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 341 80.8 3.4 (74.2–87.4)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,332 84.8 1.5 (82.0–87.7)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 457 85.2 2.1 (81.0–89.4)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 696 86.2 1.8 (82.6–89.8)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 402 86.2 2.6 (81.2–91.3)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 655 78.6 2.3 (74.1–83.2)
Bergen County, New Jersey 754 80.4 1.9 (76.7–84.2)
Burlington County, New Jersey 467 87.5 2.5 (82.5–92.5)
Camden County, New Jersey 515 85.1 2.2 (80.7–89.5)
Cape May County, New Jersey 298 81.9 4.5 (73.0–90.8)
Cumberland County, New Jersey 384 74.2 4.1 (66.2–82.1)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,017 71.4 2.0 (67.5–75.2)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 403 87.4 2.0 (83.5–91.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 1,009 70.9 2.0 (67.0–74.7)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 397 91.2 1.9 (87.5–95.0)
Mercer County, New Jersey 414 85.1 2.3 (80.7–89.6)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 660 86.0 1.7 (82.7–89.3)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 479 89.1 1.8 (85.5–92.7)
Morris County, New Jersey 580 86.5 2.3 (82.1–91.0)
Ocean County, New Jersey 403 84.8 2.3 (80.2–89.3)
Passaic County, New Jersey 527 69.2 2.8 (63.7–74.7)
Salem County, New Jersey 393 74.7 5.2 (64.5–84.9)
Somerset County, New Jersey 425 91.1 1.9 (87.4–94.8)
Sussex County, New Jersey 366 84.8 2.6 (79.7–89.8)
Union County, New Jersey 534 79.0 2.2 (74.7–83.4)
Warren County, New Jersey 356 86.4 3.3 (79.9–92.9)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 1,508 75.8 1.4 (73.1–78.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 489 65.4 2.8 (60.0–70.8)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 444 80.0 2.6 (75.0–85.0)
San Juan County, New Mexico 458 76.9 2.4 (72.1–81.7)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 482 65.9 2.7 (60.6–71.2)
Kings County, New York 421 76.4 2.8 (70.9–81.9)
Guilford County, North Carolina 353 77.8 2.7 (72.6–83.1)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 573 75.8 2.0 (71.8–79.7)
Robeson County, North Carolina 376 65.9 5.0 (56.1–75.7)
Wake County, North Carolina 576 78.5 2.2 (74.2–82.7)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 392 88.5 2.6 (83.5–93.6)
Cass County, North Dakota 593 81.1 2.3 (76.6–85.6)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 622 80.2 2.1 (76.1–84.4)
Franklin County, Ohio 640 82.7 1.9 (79.0–86.4)
Hamilton County, Ohio 556 87.1 1.8 (83.5–90.6)
Lorain County, Ohio 375 89.9 2.4 (85.3–94.6)
Lucas County, Ohio 406 79.7 3.7 (72.4–87.0)
Mahoning County, Ohio 349 84.9 3.3 (78.4–91.3)
Montgomery County, Ohio 423 78.6 2.8 (73.0–84.1)
Stark County, Ohio 405 84.2 2.7 (78.9–89.5)
Summit County, Ohio 418 78.7 3.1 (72.7–84.8)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 893 76.0 1.7 (72.7–79.3)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 830 77.1 1.8 (73.5–80.7)
Clackamas County, Oregon 331 79.8 3.3 (73.4–86.2)
Lane County, Oregon 338 74.8 3.2 (68.5–81.0)
Multnomah County, Oregon 637 80.8 2.2 (76.5–85.0)
Washington County, Oregon 434 83.4 2.4 (78.7–88.1)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 1,191 86.3 1.3 (83.8–88.9)
Bradford County, Pennsylvania 1,127 75.9 4.1 (67.8–84.0)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 399 88.2 2.3 (83.8–92.7)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 1,445 76.6 1.6 (73.4–79.8)
Pike County, Pennsylvania 1,095 83.8 1.9 (80.1–87.4)
Kent County, Rhode Island 568 86.7 2.0 (82.7–90.6)
Providence County, Rhode Island 2,324 78.5 1.3 (76.0–80.9)
Washington County, Rhode Island 394 83.1 3.0 (77.3–89.0)
Aiken County, South Carolina 341 77.8 3.2 (71.5–84.1)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 355 65.1 4.8 (55.6–74.6)
Charleston County, South Carolina 663 76.0 2.5 (71.1–80.9)
Greenville County, South Carolina 627 72.2 2.5 (67.3–77.1)
Horry County, South Carolina 492 70.9 2.7 (65.6–76.2)
Richland County, South Carolina 659 75.6 2.5 (70.6–80.5)
Spartanburg County, South Carolina 424 76.7 3.0 (70.9–82.5)
Lincoln County, South Dakota 366 85.8 3.8 (78.4–93.2)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 715 85.8 1.6 (82.8–88.9)
Pennington County, South Dakota 451 86.4 1.8 (82.7–90.0)
Davidson County, Tennessee 393 82.3 2.4 (77.5–87.0)
Shelby County, Tennessee 393 78.1 2.5 (73.2–83.0)
Bexar County, Texas 405 67.8 3.1 (61.7–73.9)
Dallas County, Texas 379 53.6 3.1 (47.5–59.7)
El Paso County, Texas 420 52.1 3.8 (44.8–59.5)
Harris County, Texas 626 61.2 2.3 (56.6–65.8)
Hidalgo County, Texas 420 35.4 3.4 (28.8–42.1)
Tarrant County, Texas 410 69.9 3.0 (63.9–75.8)
Travis County, Texas 735 70.1 2.9 (64.5–75.8)
Davis County, Utah 859 86.6 1.6 (83.4–89.7)
Salt Lake County, Utah 2,954 77.3 1.1 (75.2–79.4)
Tooele County, Utah 407 84.3 3.1 (78.3–90.3)
Utah County, Utah 1,298 79.3 1.4 (76.5–82.1)
Wasatch County, Utah 347 72.3 5.5 (61.6–82.9)
Weber County, Utah 741 82.6 1.8 (79.1–86.2)
Chittenden County, Vermont 673 92.2 1.2 (89.8–94.7)
Rutland County, Vermont 390 84.8 2.8 (79.2–90.3)
Washington County, Vermont 377 87.9 2.3 (83.3–92.5)
Windsor County, Vermont 332 89.5 2.0 (85.7–93.3)
Fairfax County, Virginia 559 85.6 2.0 (81.6–89.6)
Clark County, Washington 537 83.0 2.1 (78.8–87.2)
King County, Washington 2,743 82.6 1.0 (80.6–84.6)
Kitsap County, Washington 357 81.8 3.0 (75.8–87.7)
Pierce County, Washington 844 77.8 1.9 (74.1–81.6)
Snohomish County, Washington 860 81.4 1.8 (78.0–84.9)
Spokane County, Washington 611 79.4 2.3 (75.0–83.8)
Thurston County, Washington 349 85.6 2.5 (80.7–90.5)
Whatcom County, Washington 550 77.2 3.2 (70.9–83.5)
Yakima County, Washington 357 63.5 3.5 (56.5–70.4)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 435 79.0 2.3 (74.5–83.5)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 704 81.9 2.3 (77.5–86.3)
Laramie County, Wyoming 546 81.2 2.6 (76.0–86.4)
Natrona County, Wyoming 485 74.7 3.0 (68.8–80.7)
San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico 450 84.4 2.1 (80.3–88.6)
Median 81.4
Range 35.4–96.7

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Including health insurance, prepaid plans (e.g., health maintenance organizations), or government plans (e.g., Medicare).

Return to your place in the textTABLE 7. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 8,874 71.6 0.8 (70.1–73.1)
Alaska 4,209 64.3 1.0 (62.2–66.3)
Arizona 7,211 63.6 1.0 (61.7–65.5)
Arkansas 5,054 62.7 1.0 (60.8–64.6)
California 14,502 62.9 0.6 (61.7–64.0)
Colorado 12,034 60.1 0.6 (59.0–61.3)
Connecticut 8,686 71.7 0.7 (70.3–73.0)
Delaware 5,140 80.1 0.8 (78.6–81.7)
District of Columbia 3,796 74.1 1.2 (71.7–76.5)
Florida 7,553 70.3 0.9 (68.6–72.0)
Georgia 6,018 70.3 0.9 (68.6–72.0)
Hawaii 7,530 64.0 0.8 (62.4–65.7)
Idaho 5,841 55.7 1.2 (53.4–58.0)
Illinois 5,564 67.7 0.9 (65.9–69.5)
Indiana 8,559 63.8 0.7 (62.4–65.2)
Iowa 7,084 67.7 0.7 (66.3–69.1)
Kansas 11,612 68.1 0.6 (66.9–69.3)
Kentucky 10,981 67.2 0.7 (65.8–68.7)
Louisiana 8,891 72.4 0.8 (70.8–74.0)
Maine 9,879 70.9 0.6 (69.7–72.0)
Maryland 12,689 76.1 0.7 (74.8–77.5)
Massachusetts 21,562 78.7 0.4 (77.8–79.5)
Michigan 10,400 66.5 0.7 (65.2–67.8)
Minnesota 12,098 68.9 0.6 (67.8–70.1)
Mississippi 7,666 69.1 0.8 (67.6–70.7)
Missouri 6,651 65.8 0.9 (64.1–67.5)
Montana 8,560 57.0 0.7 (55.6–58.4)
Nebraska 18,929 60.4 0.5 (59.4–61.4)
Nevada 4,780 63.9 1.0 (61.9–65.9)
New Hampshire 7,458 70.5 0.8 (68.9–72.1)
New Jersey 15,561 75.0 0.5 (74.0–76.0)
New Mexico 8,644 57.7 0.7 (56.4–59.1)
New York 6,010 71.0 0.9 (69.3–72.7)
North Carolina 11,749 73.5 0.6 (72.4–74.6)
North Dakota 4,849 62.5 1.0 (60.6–64.3)
Ohio 12,869 71.0 0.6 (69.9–72.1)
Oklahoma 7,887 60.1 0.7 (58.7–61.6)
Oregon 5,145 57.2 0.9 (55.4–59.1)
Pennsylvania 19,807 70.3 0.5 (69.3–71.3)
Rhode Island 5,450 78.7 0.8 (77.2–80.3)
South Carolina 12,578 64.3 0.7 (63.0–65.6)
South Dakota 7,780 66.6 0.9 (64.9–68.3)
Tennessee 6,955 75.4 0.8 (73.9–76.9)
Texas 9,003 63.4 0.7 (61.9–64.8)
Utah 12,095 56.7 0.6 (55.5–58.0)
Vermont 6,002 66.6 0.8 (65.0–68.2)
Virginia 7,304 72.5 0.7 (71.1–74.0)
Washington 15,095 59.0 0.6 (57.9–60.1)
West Virginia 5,340 75.3 0.8 (73.8–76.7)
Wisconsin 5,271 69.8 1.0 (67.9–71.7)
Wyoming 6,137 58.6 1.1 (56.5–60.7)
Guam 2,007 62.8 1.5 (59.9–65.6)
Puerto Rico 6,238 78.9 0.6 (77.6–80.1)
Median 67.7
Range 55.7–80.1

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 8. Estimated prevalence of adults aged =18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
MMSA(s) Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico 540 75.6 2.3 (71.0–80.1)
Akron, Ohio 741 69.9 2.4 (65.2–74.6)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 3,229 56.7 1.1 (54.5–58.9)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 1,340 71.6 1.8 (68.0–75.2)
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California* 1,035 66.6 2.3 (62.1–71.1)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,470 66.6 1.5 (63.6–69.6)
Asheville, North Carolina 586 70.4 2.6 (65.4–75.4)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,505 70.1 1.3 (67.6–72.6)
Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey 1,012 77.4 1.9 (73.7–81.1)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 1,024 76.1 2.6 (71.1–81.2)
Augusta-Waterville, Maine 831 72.9 2.0 (69.0–76.8)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,370 62.1 2.2 (57.9–66.4)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,682 78.3 1.0 (76.4–80.2)
Bangor, Maine 924 71.6 2.0 (67.8–75.5)
Barnstable Town, Massachusetts 554 85.0 1.9 (81.3–88.6)
Barre, Vermont 512 66.6 2.8 (61.2–72.1)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,367 76.3 1.8 (72.7–79.8)
Bellingham, Washington 835 60.0 2.8 (54.5–65.6)
Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont 703 68.3 2.9 (62.6–73.9)
Billings, Montana 837 58.7 2.0 (54.9–62.5)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,792 75.5 1.5 (72.6–78.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 815 62.7 2.3 (58.1–67.2)
Boise City, Idaho 1,473 55.2 2.0 (51.3–59.1)
Boston, Massachusetts* 5,870 79.3 0.8 (77.7–80.9)
Boulder, Colorado 509 53.4 2.8 (47.9–58.8)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 561 65.1 2.9 (59.5–70.7)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,165 67.9 1.5 (65.0–70.8)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,510 66.5 1.5 (63.5–69.5)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts* 6,884 78.6 0.8 (77.1–80.2)
Camden, New Jersey* 1,958 75.6 1.4 (73.0–78.2)
Canton-Massillon, Ohio 676 77.8 2.4 (73.1–82.4)
Casper, Wyoming 807 58.6 2.9 (53.0–64.2)
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 581 69.2 2.6 (64.2–74.2)
Charleston, West Virginia 765 77.8 1.8 (74.2–81.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,684 63.2 1.8 (59.7–66.7)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,486 71.4 1.2 (69.1–73.8)
Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia 627 71.1 3.1 (65.0–77.2)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 938 64.9 2.6 (59.8–69.9)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,714 67.4 1.2 (65.2–69.7)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 2,332 70.8 1.3 (68.3–73.3)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,935 68.9 1.6 (65.8–72.0)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,758 72.1 1.5 (69.1–75.0)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,149 64.2 1.8 (60.7–67.7)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,781 64.8 1.7 (61.5–68.1)
Columbus, Ohio 1,583 69.1 1.4 (66.3–72.0)
Concord, New Hampshire 700 72.4 2.3 (67.9–76.9)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas* 898 64.8 2.0 (60.9–68.8)
Dayton, Ohio 845 69.7 2.2 (65.4–74.0)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 4,785 61.3 0.9 (59.6–63.1)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,147 67.0 1.8 (63.6–70.5)
Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Michigan* 2,203 69.9 1.6 (66.8–73.0)
Dover, Delaware 1,428 82.4 1.5 (79.4–85.4)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 508 74.8 2.5 (69.9–79.7)
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina 790 69.8 2.1 (65.7–73.9)
El Paso, Texas 621 59.2 3.2 (52.9–65.6)
Eugene, Oregon 505 54.4 3.0 (48.6–60.3)
Fairbanks, Alaska 582 62.6 2.7 (57.3–67.8)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 938 65.0 2.4 (60.4–69.7)
Farmington, New Mexico 639 57.1 2.5 (52.2–62.0)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 498 78.8 2.5 (74.0–83.6)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 799 57.4 2.8 (51.9–62.8)
Fort Collins, Colorado 585 61.1 2.5 (56.2–66.0)
Fort Wayne, Indiana 533 61.4 2.7 (56.2–66.6)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas* 720 69.9 2.3 (65.3–74.5)
Grand Island, Nebraska 841 55.7 2.4 (50.9–60.4)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 885 65.6 2.3 (61.1–70.1)
Great Falls, Montana 697 61.4 2.4 (56.6–66.2)
Greeley, Colorado 521 58.6 2.7 (53.2–63.9)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 799 72.1 2.1 (68.1–76.2)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,664 60.7 1.7 (57.4–63.9)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 734 68.7 2.3 (64.2–73.2)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 756 78.2 2.4 (73.5–82.9)
Harrisburg-Carlisle, Pennsylvania 659 69.4 2.3 (65.0–73.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,634 74.1 1.2 (71.8–76.3)
Heber, Utah 503 53.0 5.0 (43.2–62.8)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,342 58.8 2.0 (54.9–62.6)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 923 65.8 3.5 (59.0–72.6)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,125 60.6 1.8 (57.0–64.1)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,090 73.4 1.9 (69.6–77.2)
Huntsville, Alabama 610 69.0 2.6 (63.8–74.2)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 536 54.9 3.7 (47.7–62.2)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 2,182 65.9 1.3 (63.4–68.5)
Jackson, Mississippi 907 72.9 1.9 (69.1–76.7)
Jacksonville, Florida 514 72.6 3.0 (66.7–78.5)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,210 61.3 2.1 (57.2–65.3)
Kalispell, Montana 554 55.2 2.5 (50.3–60.1)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 4,686 66.1 1.3 (63.4–68.7)
Kapaa, Hawaii 664 62.9 2.9 (57.3–68.6)
Keene, New Hampshire 541 65.1 3.4 (58.5–71.7)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 528 58.2 2.8 (52.7–63.8)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 559 78.8 2.9 (73.0–84.5)
Knoxville, Tennessee 823 76.3 2.2 (72.0–80.6)
Laconia, New Hampshire 564 67.3 3.4 (60.5–74.0)
Lafayette, Louisiana 543 71.6 2.7 (66.3–76.9)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 701 58.9 2.5 (54.0–63.7)
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nevada 1,977 65.2 1.3 (62.7–67.8)
Lewiston-Auburn, Maine 696 69.5 2.2 (65.2–73.9)
Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 522 69.4 2.5 (64.5–74.3)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,640 58.5 1.5 (55.7–61.4)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,151 64.0 2.0 (60.1–67.8)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 491 54.6 3.1 (48.6–60.6)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California* 3,488 64.7 1.1 (62.5–67.0)
Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 2,155 65.2 1.6 (62.0–68.3)
Lumberton, North Carolina 543 71.5 4.4 (62.8–80.2)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,891 71.1 1.4 (68.3–73.9)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas 606 56.3 3.2 (50.0–62.6)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,297 75.6 1.8 (72.1–79.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,661 70.8 1.7 (67.4–74.2)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,250 72.4 1.9 (68.6–76.1)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 7,813 69.2 0.8 (67.7–70.7)
Missoula, Montana 775 53.1 2.3 (48.7–57.6)
Mobile, Alabama 799 75.2 2.7 (69.9–80.5)
Montgomery, Alabama 530 74.8 2.9 (69.2–80.5)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania* 1,303 68.2 1.6 (65.1–71.4)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 933 64.8 2.2 (60.6–69.1)
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,324 74.6 1.7 (71.3–78.0)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York* 889 70.9 2.2 (66.6–75.2)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania* 6,499 74.6 0.9 (72.9–76.4)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,995 70.1 1.5 (67.1–73.0)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 1,261 70.4 1.9 (66.6–74.1)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey* 7,357 71.9 1.0 (70.0–73.9)
Norfolk, Nebraska 557 50.6 3.0 (44.8–56.4)
North Platte, Nebraska 606 54.4 3.1 (48.3–60.4)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 993 79.3 2.0 (75.4–83.1)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California* 973 66.1 2.3 (61.6–70.6)
Ocean City, New Jersey 547 74.8 4.0 (67.0–82.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,371 59.9 1.3 (57.4–62.4)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,400 60.7 1.3 (58.1–63.2)
Olympia-Tumwater, Washington 512 66.0 2.8 (60.6–71.5)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 5,540 64.0 0.9 (62.2–65.7)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 560 73.8 2.8 (68.2–79.3)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania* 2,442 72.0 1.3 (69.5–74.6)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 2,571 62.9 1.3 (60.3–65.5)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,352 69.7 1.1 (67.6–71.8)
Ponce, Puerto Rico 543 79.9 2.0 (75.9–83.9)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 3,321 71.9 1.0 (69.9–73.8)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,064 58.8 1.2 (56.4–61.2)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 8,089 79.1 0.8 (77.6–80.6)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,692 52.3 1.5 (49.3–55.4)
Raleigh, North Carolina 930 72.9 1.8 (69.3–76.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,046 64.3 2.1 (60.2–68.4)
Reno, Nevada 1,497 60.5 1.9 (56.8–64.2)
Richmond, Virginia 1,003 75.0 1.9 (71.3–78.8)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,522 63.2 1.8 (59.8–66.7)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire* 1,662 71.9 1.6 (68.8–75.0)
Rutland, Vermont 589 63.6 2.8 (58.1–69.1)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 992 63.4 2.2 (59.1–67.7)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,056 70.9 1.5 (68.1–73.8)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,105 79.5 1.8 (75.9–83.1)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,500 55.8 1.0 (53.9–57.8)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 770 67.0 2.4 (62.3–71.6)
San Diego-Carlsbad, California 1,125 63.5 2.1 (59.4–67.6)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California* 593 62.2 2.8 (56.7–67.8)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 684 58.7 2.6 (53.6–63.8)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,913 79.2 0.8 (77.7–80.8)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 687 60.2 2.3 (55.7–64.6)
Sayre, Pennsylvania 1,852 68.4 2.4 (63.6–73.1)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 623 55.9 3.2 (49.5–62.3)
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pennsylvania 736 75.3 2.3 (70.8–79.8)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington* 5,043 59.7 0.9 (57.9–61.6)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 569 69.5 2.8 (64.1–75.0)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland* 2,282 73.1 1.5 (70.0–76.1)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 1,194 67.2 3.0 (61.4–73.0)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,447 67.6 1.6 (64.4–70.8)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 700 65.8 2.7 (60.5–71.2)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,082 58.2 2.1 (54.1–62.3)
Springfield, Massachusetts 2,327 76.9 1.5 (74.0–79.8)
Tacoma-Lakewood, Washington* 1,157 56.0 2.0 (52.1–59.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 824 69.9 2.3 (65.5–74.4)
Toledo, Ohio 963 68.7 2.6 (63.7–73.7)
Topeka, Kansas 1,071 70.4 1.9 (66.7–74.1)
Torrington, Connecticut 655 71.1 2.3 (66.5–75.7)
Trenton, New Jersey 574 78.7 2.2 (74.5–83.0)
Tucson, Arizona 987 66.3 2.1 (62.1–70.5)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,723 61.6 1.5 (58.7–64.6)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 573 76.0 3.1 (70.1–82.0)
Urban Honolulu, Hawaii 4,314 65.6 1.1 (63.5–67.7)
Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey 556 77.8 3.1 (71.7–83.9)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,492 76.5 1.6 (73.4–79.6)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan* 2,167 67.3 1.3 (64.7–69.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia* 8,137 71.4 0.9 (69.6–73.2)
Wichita, Kansas 2,324 67.9 1.3 (65.3–70.5)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey* 3,208 77.4 1.2 (75.1–79.8)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 787 77.8 1.9 (74.2–81.4)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 2,832 77.0 1.2 (74.6–79.4)
Yakima, Washington 521 55.6 3.1 (49.6–61.7)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 923 73.6 2.6 (68.4–78.7)
Median   68.3    
Range   50.6–85.0    

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Metropolitan division.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 9. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who visited a doctor for a routine checkup during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
County Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Jefferson County, Alabama 943 75.5 1.9 (71.8–79.2)
Madison County, Alabama 509 70.2 2.8 (64.7–75.7)
Mobile County, Alabama 799 75.2 2.7 (69.9–80.5)
Anchorage Municipality, Alaska 886 68.1 1.8 (64.5–71.7)
Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska 582 62.6 2.7 (57.3–67.8)
Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska 584 61.4 2.7 (56.2–66.7)
Maricopa County, Arizona 2,093 62.2 1.4 (59.5–65.0)
Pima County, Arizona 987 66.3 2.1 (62.1–70.5)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 733 68.0 2.6 (62.9–73.2)
Alameda County, California 618 64.4 2.9 (58.7–70.1)
Los Angeles County, California 3,488 64.7 1.1 (62.5–67.0)
Orange County, California 1,035 66.6 2.3 (62.1–71.1)
Riverside County, California 822 64.4 2.4 (59.7–69.2)
Sacramento County, California 607 63.5 2.9 (57.9–69.1)
San Bernardino County, California 700 61.6 2.5 (56.7–66.6)
San Diego County, California 1,125 63.5 2.1 (59.4–67.6)
Santa Clara County, California 665 59.1 2.6 (53.9–64.2)
Adams County, Colorado 797 54.9 2.3 (50.3–59.4)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 848 64.0 2.0 (60.1–67.9)
Boulder County, Colorado 509 53.4 2.8 (47.9–58.8)
Denver County, Colorado 981 60.2 1.9 (56.5–63.9)
Douglas County, Colorado 540 64.5 2.5 (59.6–69.4)
El Paso County, Colorado 1,009 64.5 1.8 (60.8–68.1)
Jefferson County, Colorado 1,104 63.8 1.8 (60.3–67.2)
Larimer County, Colorado 585 61.1 2.5 (56.2–66.0)
Weld County, Colorado 521 58.6 2.7 (53.2–63.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,165 67.9 1.5 (65.0–70.8)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,963 75.2 1.3 (72.7–77.7)
Litchfield County, Connecticut 655 71.1 2.3 (66.5–75.7)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,995 70.1 1.5 (67.1–73.0)
New London County, Connecticut 993 79.3 2.0 (75.4–83.1)
Kent County, Delaware 1,428 82.4 1.5 (79.4–85.4)
New Castle County, Delaware 2,319 78.7 1.2 (76.4–81.0)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,393 81.5 1.6 (78.4–84.5)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,796 74.1 1.2 (71.7–76.5)
Broward County, Florida 525 70.3 3.1 (64.2–76.4)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 812 69.2 2.8 (63.8–74.6)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,342 58.8 2.0 (54.9–62.6)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 4,314 65.6 1.1 (63.5–67.7)
Kauai County, Hawaii 664 62.9 2.9 (57.3–68.6)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,210 61.3 2.1 (57.2–65.3)
Ada County, Idaho 806 54.7 2.6 (49.7–59.8)
Canyon County, Idaho 500 54.4 3.7 (47.2–61.6)
Cook County, Illinois 1,503 68.4 1.6 (65.2–71.6)
Lake County, Indiana 877 64.3 2.8 (58.8–69.9)
Marion County, Indiana 1,270 64.9 1.8 (61.4–68.5)
Polk County, Iowa 801 66.1 2.1 (62.1–70.1)
Johnson County, Kansas 2,164 73.0 1.3 (70.4–75.5)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,773 67.3 1.5 (64.3–70.2)
Shawnee County, Kansas 763 71.3 2.3 (66.8–75.9)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 855 66.5 3.1 (60.5–72.6)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 1,673 68.0 1.9 (64.3–71.7)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 566 77.2 2.4 (72.5–81.9)
Androscoggin County, Maine 696 69.5 2.2 (65.2–73.9)
Aroostook County, Maine 535 70.3 2.6 (65.3–75.3)
Cumberland County, Maine 1,749 72.5 1.3 (69.9–75.1)
Kennebec County, Maine 831 72.9 2.0 (69.0–76.8)
Penobscot County, Maine 924 71.6 2.0 (67.8–75.5)
York County, Maine 1,192 72.4 1.7 (69.1–75.6)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 887 76.7 2.1 (72.5–80.8)
Baltimore County, Maryland 1,505 80.6 1.5 (77.6–83.6)
Charles County, Maryland 510 69.9 3.8 (62.4–77.4)
Frederick County, Maryland 748 69.3 3.4 (62.7–75.9)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,534 74.1 1.7 (70.7–77.4)
Prince George´s County, Maryland 1,135 75.3 2.3 (70.8–79.8)
Washington County, Maryland 536 79.4 3.1 (73.3–85.5)
Baltimore city, Maryland 742 78.0 2.5 (73.0–83.0)
Barnstable County, Massachusetts 554 85.0 1.9 (81.3–88.6)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,639 80.3 1.6 (77.2–83.4)
Essex County, Massachusetts 2,544 82.4 1.3 (79.9–85.0)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,949 79.1 1.5 (76.0–82.1)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 4,340 76.9 1.0 (75.1–78.8)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 1,753 79.3 1.4 (76.5–82.1)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 1,823 80.6 1.5 (77.6–83.5)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 2,294 78.1 1.3 (75.5–80.7)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 2,588 77.7 1.3 (75.2–80.2)
Kent County, Michigan 522 64.5 3.1 (58.5–70.5)
Macomb County, Michigan 608 68.0 2.3 (63.6–72.5)
Oakland County, Michigan 1,163 68.9 1.9 (65.3–72.6)
Wayne County, Michigan 2,203 69.9 1.6 (66.8–73.0)
Anoka County, Minnesota 536 62.7 2.7 (57.3–68.0)
Dakota County, Minnesota 665 74.5 2.0 (70.5–78.4)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 3,271 69.3 1.2 (67.0–71.6)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 1,925 68.0 2.2 (63.7–72.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 878 63.7 2.8 (58.3–69.1)
St. Louis County, Missouri 948 72.3 2.1 (68.2–76.4)
Cascade County, Montana 697 61.4 2.4 (56.6–66.2)
Flathead County, Montana 554 55.2 2.5 (50.3–60.1)
Hill County, Montana 575 58.8 3.5 (52.0–65.6)
Lake County, Montana 886 54.0 2.8 (48.6–59.5)
Missoula County, Montana 775 53.1 2.3 (48.7–57.6)
Yellowstone County, Montana 742 58.7 2.0 (54.7–62.7)
Dakota County, Nebraska 726 69.8 3.8 (62.2–77.3)
Douglas County, Nebraska 3,539 62.7 1.1 (60.6–64.7)
Hall County, Nebraska 526 55.9 3.0 (50.0–61.9)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 1,421 58.5 1.5 (55.5–61.5)
Lincoln County, Nebraska 583 54.1 3.2 (47.9–60.3)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 1,167 66.5 1.8 (62.9–70.1)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 571 55.7 3.3 (49.2–62.2)
Clark County, Nevada 1,977 65.2 1.3 (62.7–67.8)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,478 60.6 1.9 (56.9–64.4)
Belknap County, New Hampshire 564 67.3 3.4 (60.5–74.0)
Carroll County, New Hampshire 525 67.3 3.4 (60.7–73.9)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 541 65.1 3.4 (58.5–71.7)
Coos County, New Hampshire 532 68.4 3.3 (61.9–75.0)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 561 68.8 3.1 (62.8–74.9)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,891 71.1 1.4 (68.3–73.9)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 700 72.4 2.3 (67.9–76.9)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,043 74.1 1.9 (70.4–77.7)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 619 67.1 3.0 (61.2–73.0)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 1,012 77.4 1.9 (73.7–81.1)
Bergen County, New Jersey 1,000 75.2 1.9 (71.5–78.9)
Burlington County, New Jersey 679 76.2 2.2 (71.8–80.6)
Camden County, New Jersey 734 75.7 2.1 (71.5–79.9)
Cape May County, New Jersey 547 74.8 4.0 (67.0–82.6)
Cumberland County, New Jersey 556 77.8 3.1 (71.7–83.9)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,324 75.0 1.7 (71.7–78.2)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 545 75.2 2.6 (70.0–80.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 1,287 74.2 1.7 (70.8–77.5)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 564 72.1 2.7 (66.8–77.4)
Mercer County, New Jersey 574 78.7 2.2 (74.5–83.0)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 872 75.3 2.1 (71.2–79.4)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 702 72.7 2.2 (68.3–77.0)
Morris County, New Jersey 845 74.4 2.1 (70.2–78.6)
Ocean County, New Jersey 652 76.4 2.2 (72.1–80.8)
Passaic County, New Jersey 684 71.0 2.4 (66.3–75.7)
Salem County, New Jersey 574 71.4 4.1 (63.3–79.5)
Somerset County, New Jersey 635 74.3 2.4 (69.5–79.0)
Sussex County, New Jersey 539 72.0 2.9 (66.3–77.6)
Union County, New Jersey 709 75.8 2.0 (71.9–79.7)
Warren County, New Jersey 527 76.7 2.7 (71.4–82.0)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 2,041 55.5 1.3 (52.8–58.1)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 701 58.9 2.5 (54.0–63.7)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 650 58.4 2.5 (53.5–63.4)
San Juan County, New Mexico 639 57.1 2.5 (52.2–62.0)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 687 60.2 2.3 (55.7–64.6)
Kings County, New York 496 66.9 2.9 (61.3–72.5)
Guilford County, North Carolina 506 72.1 2.7 (66.9–77.3)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 723 72.1 2.0 (68.2–76.0)
Robeson County, North Carolina 543 71.5 4.4 (62.8–80.2)
Wake County, North Carolina 689 72.3 2.1 (68.2–76.3)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 563 63.6 2.8 (58.0–69.1)
Cass County, North Dakota 842 62.1 2.4 (57.3–66.8)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 854 73.1 1.9 (69.4–76.8)
Franklin County, Ohio 831 68.4 1.9 (64.6–72.2)
Hamilton County, Ohio 764 77.3 1.9 (73.6–80.9)
Lorain County, Ohio 604 77.1 2.7 (71.8–82.5)
Lucas County, Ohio 618 70.4 3.1 (64.4–76.4)
Mahoning County, Ohio 590 76.3 2.9 (70.7–81.9)
Montgomery County, Ohio 654 69.0 2.6 (63.9–74.1)
Stark County, Ohio 618 78.5 2.4 (73.7–83.3)
Summit County, Ohio 628 71.9 2.6 (66.8–77.1)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,175 61.3 1.7 (57.9–64.7)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,192 60.3 1.8 (56.8–63.9)
Clackamas County, Oregon 501 52.9 3.1 (46.9–59.0)
Lane County, Oregon 505 54.4 3.0 (48.6–60.3)
Multnomah County, Oregon 871 58.4 2.3 (54.0–62.8)
Washington County, Oregon 605 63.7 2.6 (58.6–68.8)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 1,881 69.2 1.4 (66.5–71.9)
Bradford County, Pennsylvania 1,852 68.4 2.4 (63.6–73.1)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 541 66.4 2.5 (61.5–71.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 2,049 71.7 1.5 (68.8–74.6)
Pike County, Pennsylvania 1,883 72.9 2.2 (68.6–77.1)
Kent County, Rhode Island 812 82.6 1.8 (79.1–86.1)
Providence County, Rhode Island 3,328 78.6 1.0 (76.5–80.6)
Washington County, Rhode Island 650 75.3 2.6 (70.2–80.5)
Aiken County, South Carolina 550 70.0 2.8 (64.5–75.5)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 793 67.1 3.5 (60.2–74.0)
Charleston County, South Carolina 1,004 62.8 2.4 (58.2–67.5)
Greenville County, South Carolina 895 61.6 2.3 (57.2–66.1)
Horry County, South Carolina 768 61.0 2.3 (56.4–65.6)
Richland County, South Carolina 956 67.5 2.3 (62.9–72.1)
Spartanburg County, South Carolina 649 66.9 2.8 (61.4–72.4)
Lincoln County, South Dakota 493 68.1 3.4 (61.3–74.8)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 869 67.2 1.9 (63.4–70.9)
Pennington County, South Dakota 602 64.3 2.4 (59.6–69.1)
Davidson County, Tennessee 551 74.1 2.7 (68.8–79.4)
Shelby County, Tennessee 535 78.2 2.3 (73.7–82.6)
Bexar County, Texas 579 64.5 2.8 (59.0–69.9)
Dallas County, Texas 509 63.0 2.7 (57.7–68.2)
El Paso County, Texas 620 59.3 3.2 (53.0–65.7)
Harris County, Texas 755 58.4 2.2 (54.1–62.7)
Hidalgo County, Texas 606 56.3 3.2 (50.0–62.6)
Tarrant County, Texas 566 71.1 2.6 (66.1–76.2)
Travis County, Texas 1,038 59.5 2.6 (54.4–64.6)
Davis County, Utah 1,116 59.0 1.8 (55.4–62.6)
Salt Lake County, Utah 3,957 55.6 1.0 (53.6–57.6)
Tooele County, Utah 543 60.4 3.5 (53.5–67.3)
Utah County, Utah 1,625 52.4 1.6 (49.3–55.5)
Wasatch County, Utah 503 53.0 5.0 (43.2–62.8)
Weber County, Utah 1,025 60.7 2.0 (56.8–64.7)
Chittenden County, Vermont 910 65.6 1.9 (62.0–69.3)
Rutland County, Vermont 589 63.6 2.8 (58.1–69.1)
Washington County, Vermont 512 66.6 2.8 (61.2–72.1)
Windsor County, Vermont 543 70.0 2.5 (65.0–75.0)
Fairfax County, Virginia 735 71.2 2.2 (67.0–75.4)
Clark County, Washington 780 57.6 2.3 (53.1–62.2)
King County, Washington 3,881 60.6 1.1 (58.5–62.7)
Kitsap County, Washington 561 65.1 2.9 (59.5–70.7)
Pierce County, Washington 1,157 56.0 2.0 (52.1–59.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,162 56.7 1.9 (53.0–60.5)
Spokane County, Washington 939 59.4 2.3 (55.0–63.9)
Thurston County, Washington 512 66.0 2.8 (60.6–71.5)
Whatcom County, Washington 835 60.0 2.8 (54.5–65.6)
Yakima County, Washington 521 55.6 3.1 (49.6–61.7)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 636 78.3 2.0 (74.4–82.1)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 958 71.3 2.4 (66.7–75.9)
Laramie County, Wyoming 938 64.9 2.6 (59.8–69.9)
Natrona County, Wyoming 807 58.6 2.9 (53.0–64.2)
San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico 662 78.3 2.0 (74.5–82.2)
Median 68.0
Range 52.4–85.0

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 10. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 3,123 61.2 1.2 (58.9–63.5)
Alaska 765 50.8 2.5 (45.9–55.6)
Arizona 2,808 52.3 1.5 (49.5–55.2)
Arkansas 1,909 57.2 1.4 (54.4–60.0)
California 3,764 57.9 1.2 (55.5–60.3)
Colorado 3,374 66.2 1.0 (64.2–68.3)
Connecticut 2,682 59.5 1.3 (57.0–62.0)
Delaware 1,682 63.1 1.5 (60.1–66.1)
District of Columbia 1,202 56.7 2.0 (52.8–60.6)
Florida 2,977 54.7 1.4 (52.0–57.4)
Georgia 1,853 60.1 1.5 (57.2–63.0)
Hawaii 1,965 62.7 1.6 (59.5–65.9)
Idaho 2,154 52.0 1.7 (48.7–55.2)
Illinois 1,939 52.5 1.5 (49.6–55.4)
Indiana 2,698 57.1 1.2 (54.8–59.5)
Iowa 2,417 70.1 1.0 (68.0–72.1)
Kansas 3,929 66.7 0.9 (65.0–68.5)
Kentucky 3,274 61.8 1.3 (59.3–64.4)
Louisiana 3,184 63.8 1.3 (61.2–66.3)
Maine 3,120 61.3 1.1 (59.2–63.4)
Maryland 4,056 63.2 1.2 (60.9–65.5)
Massachusetts 6,045 63.6 1.0 (61.7–65.5)
Michigan 3,481 55.4 1.1 (53.3–57.5)
Minnesota 3,320 65.5 1.1 (63.4–67.6)
Mississippi 2,805 62.4 1.1 (60.1–64.6)
Missouri 2,381 67.3 1.4 (64.6–70.1)
Montana 2,779 57.5 1.2 (55.2–59.9)
Nebraska 6,625 62.9 0.9 (61.2–64.6)
Nevada 1,535 50.0 2.0 (46.1–54.0)
New Hampshire 2,584 58.9 1.2 (56.5–61.3)
New Jersey 4,259 61.2 1.1 (59.0–63.4)
New Mexico 2,494 57.8 1.2 (55.4–60.1)
New York 1,670 55.1 1.9 (51.4–58.7)
North Carolina 3,601 68.4 1.0 (66.5–70.3)
North Dakota 1,567 59.7 1.5 (56.7–62.6)
Ohio 3,916 61.0 1.1 (58.8–63.1)
Oklahoma 2,576 67.8 1.1 (65.6–70.0)
Oregon 1,770 53.9 1.4 (51.1–56.7)
Pennsylvania 6,463 60.2 0.9 (58.4–62.0)
Rhode Island 1,632 57.6 1.5 (54.7–60.6)
South Carolina 4,337 60.1 1.1 (57.9–62.3)
South Dakota 2,353 66.4 1.8 (62.8–70.0)
Tennessee 2,240 69.9 1.3 (67.4–72.5)
Texas 2,653 59.4 1.4 (56.8–62.1)
Utah 3,263 56.0 1.1 (53.9–58.1)
Vermont 1,955 64.2 1.3 (61.6–66.8)
Virginia 2,164 60.1 1.3 (57.5–62.6)
Washington 4,905 60.1 0.9 (58.4–61.9)
West Virginia 1,698 68.9 1.3 (66.4–71.4)
Wisconsin 1,574 50.5 1.9 (46.8–54.3)
Wyoming 2,351 53.3 1.5 (50.3–56.3)
Guam 218 39.2 3.9 (31.6–46.7)
Puerto Rico 1,838 26.3 1.2 (24.0–28.6)
Median 60.1
Range 26.3–70.1

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 11. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
MMSA(s) Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico 158 20.8 3.8 (13.4–28.2)
Akron, Ohio 224 62.6 3.9 (54.9–70.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 864 60.1 2.0 (56.1–64.1)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 421 72.1 2.7 (66.8–77.4)
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California* 274 65.0 4.6 (56.0–74.0)
Anchorage, Alaska 239 54.5 4.0 (46.8–62.3)
Asheville, North Carolina 223 73.9 3.4 (67.2–80.5)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 668 57.2 2.4 (52.4–62.0)
Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey 341 58.0 3.5 (51.1–64.9)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 354 59.6 4.4 (50.9–68.2)
Augusta-Waterville, Maine 221 68.8 3.8 (61.4–76.2)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 399 64.0 3.4 (57.3–70.7)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 1,388 66.1 1.7 (62.8–69.4)
Bangor, Maine 253 59.0 3.6 (51.9–66.2)
Barnstable Town, Massachusetts 252 58.9 4.0 (51.0–66.8)
Barre, Vermont 135 68.8 4.6 (59.8–77.7)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 489 64.6 3.2 (58.4–70.8)
Bellingham, Washington 278 60.5 3.5 (53.6–67.4)
Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont 276 58.8 3.6 (51.7–65.8)
Billings, Montana 250 66.6 3.3 (60.1–73.1)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 575 63.7 2.6 (58.7–68.8)
Bismarck, North Dakota 252 59.4 3.9 (51.8–67.0)
Boise City, Idaho 495 51.1 3.1 (45.0–57.3)
Boston, Massachusetts* 1,589 61.9 1.9 (58.1–65.7)
Boulder, Colorado 126 72.2 4.4 (63.5–80.8)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 201 65.1 4.0 (57.4–72.9)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 601 57.1 2.7 (51.8–62.4)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 418 65.7 2.8 (60.1–71.2)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts* 1,814 67.0 1.6 (63.8–70.1)
Camden, New Jersey* 550 65.5 2.6 (60.5–70.5)
Canton-Massillon, Ohio 216 58.8 4.3 (50.5–67.2)
Casper, Wyoming 318 50.7 4.2 (42.5–58.9)
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 198 71.2 3.5 (64.3–78.1)
Charleston, West Virginia 237 74.8 3.3 (68.4–81.2)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 540 68.1 3.0 (62.2–73.9)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 675 63.2 2.5 (58.3–68.0)
Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia 221 61.8 4.4 (53.2–70.4)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 390 62.1 3.5 (55.2–69.0)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 1,141 52.2 2.1 (48.0–56.3)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 632 63.3 2.6 (58.1–68.4)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 700 60.1 2.1 (55.9–64.3)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 535 58.3 3.1 (52.3–64.3)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 283 62.0 3.4 (55.3–68.7)
Columbia, South Carolina 524 62.3 3.1 (56.2–68.5)
Columbus, Ohio 396 67.4 3.0 (61.5–73.4)
Concord, New Hampshire 231 51.3 3.9 (43.6–59.0)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas* 216 56.2 4.1 (48.1–64.3)
Dayton, Ohio 276 57.5 3.6 (50.3–64.6)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 1,155 68.3 1.6 (65.1–71.5)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 346 72.2 2.7 (66.8–77.5)
Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Michigan* 750 46.5 3.0 (40.7–52.3)
Dover, Delaware 484 59.3 2.8 (53.7–64.8)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 152 59.9 4.9 (50.2–69.6)
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina 206 72.4 3.6 (65.3–79.5)
El Paso, Texas 195 50.9 4.8 (41.4–60.4)
Eugene, Oregon 176 49.9 4.5 (41.2–58.7)
Fairbanks, Alaska 100 44.0 6.0 (32.2–55.7)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 263 65.3 4.0 (57.4–73.1)
Farmington, New Mexico 172 50.7 4.6 (41.7–59.6)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 123 61.5 5.3 (51.1–71.9)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 289 56.6 3.8 (49.1–64.1)
Fort Collins, Colorado 170 70.3 3.8 (62.8–77.7)
Fort Wayne, Indiana 147 51.8 4.7 (42.6–61.0)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas* 221 60.0 4.2 (51.8–68.2)
Grand Island, Nebraska 312 62.4 3.8 (54.9–69.8)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 268 57.9 3.6 (50.8–65.0)
Great Falls, Montana 256 55.8 3.5 (48.8–62.7)
Greeley, Colorado 123 59.6 5.3 (49.3–69.9)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 246 77.8 3.0 (71.9–83.7)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 541 62.6 2.9 (57.0–68.2)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 257 62.9 3.6 (55.9–69.9)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 262 63.6 4.1 (55.6–71.7)
Harrisburg-Carlisle, Pennsylvania 186 59.8 4.2 (51.5–68.0)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 817 60.9 2.2 (56.5–65.3)
Heber, Utah 154 58.6 4.4 (50.0–67.2)
Hilo, Hawaii 381 53.1 3.6 (46.1–60.1)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 485 60.4 2.6 (55.3–65.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 219 61.7 3.9 (54.0–69.3)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 343 66.9 3.0 (61.0–72.8)
Huntsville, Alabama 153 54.8 5.2 (44.7–64.9)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 180 54.0 5.8 (42.6–65.3)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 634 61.5 2.4 (56.7–66.3)
Jackson, Mississippi 277 62.7 3.4 (56.1–69.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 168 55.5 4.7 (46.2–64.8)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 363 57.7 3.9 (50.2–65.3)
Kalispell, Montana 177 58.1 4.3 (49.8–66.5)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1,532 66.5 2.3 (62.0–71.0)
Kapaa, Hawaii 225 62.8 4.0 (55.1–70.6)
Keene, New Hampshire 212 59.7 4.1 (51.6–67.8)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 155 51.8 4.7 (42.6–61.0)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 194 68.4 4.7 (59.2–77.7)
Knoxville, Tennessee 266 75.7 3.4 (69.1–82.3)
Laconia, New Hampshire 236 55.5 4.0 (47.6–63.4)
Lafayette, Louisiana 167 60.5 5.2 (50.4–70.6)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 203 61.1 3.9 (53.5–68.7)
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nevada 511 50.6 2.8 (45.0–56.1)
Lewiston-Auburn, Maine 187 68.7 4.0 (60.8–76.6)
Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 117 61.9 5.7 (50.7–73.1)
Lincoln, Nebraska 367 69.4 3.1 (63.4–75.4)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 371 59.2 3.2 (53.0–65.5)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 128 52.8 5.2 (42.6–63.0)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California* 744 55.6 2.8 (50.1–61.2)
Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 644 62.2 3.1 (56.2–68.2)
Lumberton, North Carolina 155 47.4 5.9 (35.8–59.0)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 534 56.8 2.6 (51.8–61.8)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas 189 63.8 4.3 (55.4–72.2)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 414 70.5 3.4 (63.9–77.1)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 589 53.0 3.2 (46.7–59.4)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 315 53.4 4.1 (45.4–61.3)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 2,004 67.6 1.5 (64.7–70.5)
Missoula, Montana 221 56.5 3.9 (48.8–64.2)
Mobile, Alabama 304 65.8 3.7 (58.6–73.0)
Montgomery, Alabama 177 62.4 4.5 (53.6–71.2)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania* 346 63.7 3.1 (57.6–69.7)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 353 62.1 3.1 (56.1–68.1)
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 320 71.9 3.1 (65.7–78.0)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York* 258 59.2 3.9 (51.5–66.9)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania* 1,950 59.4 2.0 (55.4–63.4)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 626 57.3 2.7 (52.0–62.6)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 394 66.4 3.0 (60.6–72.2)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey* 1,704 56.0 2.4 (51.2–60.7)
Norfolk, Nebraska 196 53.9 4.5 (45.1–62.7)
North Platte, Nebraska 262 50.0 4.3 (41.6–58.3)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 355 62.3 3.8 (54.8–69.7)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California* 260 59.2 5.1 (49.2–69.2)
Ocean City, New Jersey 236 63.2 3.8 (55.8–70.7)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 632 55.4 2.2 (51.0–59.8)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 625 69.5 2.2 (65.2–73.9)
Olympia-Tumwater, Washington 158 53.1 5.0 (43.3–62.9)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,515 68.2 1.6 (65.1–71.4)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 210 54.6 5.1 (44.5–64.6)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania* 680 54.0 2.5 (49.1–59.0)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 836 54.1 2.2 (49.7–58.4)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,136 60.8 1.8 (57.3–64.3)
Ponce, Puerto Rico 155 21.2 3.9 (13.7–28.8)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 1,052 60.3 1.8 (56.8–63.9)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 914 59.7 2.0 (55.8–63.6)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 2,468 58.7 1.5 (55.8–61.5)
Provo-Orem, Utah 387 51.1 2.9 (45.5–56.8)
Raleigh, North Carolina 183 74.3 4.1 (66.3–82.2)
Rapid City, South Dakota 296 64.4 3.9 (56.7–72.1)
Reno, Nevada 498 52.6 2.8 (47.2–58.0)
Richmond, Virginia 311 61.1 3.1 (55.0–67.2)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 395 56.7 3.6 (49.7–63.7)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire* 536 63.8 2.5 (58.9–68.6)
Rutland, Vermont 194 59.7 4.2 (51.4–68.0)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 260 61.6 4.1 (53.5–69.6)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 659 63.6 2.8 (58.1–69.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 871 63.1 2.0 (59.3–67.0)
Salt Lake City, Utah 1,168 58.8 1.8 (55.2–62.3)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 237 63.6 4.2 (55.5–71.8)
San Diego-Carlsbad, California 300 55.1 3.9 (47.5–62.7)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California* 156 64.6 6.1 (52.6–76.7)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 162 54.1 6.0 (42.3–65.9)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 1,141 27.9 1.6 (24.8–30.9)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 195 62.4 4.0 (54.6–70.2)
Sayre, Pennsylvania 690 52.2 2.2 (47.9–56.4)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 269 52.4 4.1 (44.3–60.4)
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pennsylvania 264 59.7 3.7 (52.4–67.0)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington* 1,399 60.7 1.7 (57.4–64.1)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 192 60.2 4.4 (51.5–68.9)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland* 688 62.8 2.7 (57.5–68.2)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 448 56.2 4.7 (47.0–65.4)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 301 68.3 3.8 (60.8–75.8)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 237 56.0 4.7 (46.8–65.3)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 374 59.1 3.0 (53.3–65.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 633 64.1 3.1 (58.1–70.1)
Tacoma-Lakewood, Washington* 314 60.6 3.4 (54.0–67.2)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 304 56.0 3.7 (48.8–63.3)
Toledo, Ohio 298 61.9 3.5 (55.0–68.8)
Topeka, Kansas 336 65.9 3.0 (60.1–71.8)
Torrington, Connecticut 210 62.5 4.1 (54.5–70.4)
Trenton, New Jersey 152 62.7 5.1 (52.8–72.7)
Tucson, Arizona 368 50.6 3.2 (44.4–56.8)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 537 66.4 2.4 (61.7–71.0)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 198 63.4 4.2 (55.1–71.7)
Urban Honolulu, Hawaii 996 65.4 2.1 (61.3–69.5)
Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey 159 61.7 5.0 (52.0–71.5)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 445 59.0 3.0 (53.1–64.8)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan* 670 57.4 2.3 (52.9–61.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia* 2,255 58.7 1.8 (55.3–62.2)
Wichita, Kansas 743 68.2 2.0 (64.3–72.0)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey* 892 62.6 2.3 (58.1–67.1)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 260 64.8 3.5 (57.9–71.7)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 783 63.8 2.5 (58.8–68.7)
Yakima, Washington 169 60.4 4.5 (51.5–69.3)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 337 55.2 4.2 (46.9–63.5)
Median 60.5
Range 20.8–77.8

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Metropolitan division.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 12. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who received an influenza vaccination during the preceding 12 months, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
County Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Jefferson County, Alabama 271 66.6 3.6 (59.5–73.6)
Madison County, Alabama 130 55.5 5.8 (44.2–66.8)
Mobile County, Alabama 304 65.8 3.7 (58.6–73.0)
Anchorage Municipality, Alaska 132 56.1 4.9 (46.5–65.8)
Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska 100 44.0 6.0 (32.2–55.7)
Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska 107 48.5 5.6 (37.5–59.6)
Maricopa County, Arizona 614 53.6 2.4 (48.9–58.3)
Pima County, Arizona 368 50.6 3.2 (44.4–56.9)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 245 60.8 4.0 (52.9–68.7)
Alameda County, California 159 54.3 7.0 (40.6–68.0)
Los Angeles County, California 744 55.6 2.8 (50.1–61.2)
Orange County, California 274 65.0 4.6 (56.0–74.0)
Riverside County, California 239 56.9 4.9 (47.3–66.6)
Sacramento County, California 150 63.8 5.3 (53.4–74.1)
San Bernardino County, California 156 56.5 5.2 (46.2–66.7)
San Diego County, California 300 55.1 3.9 (47.5–62.7)
Santa Clara County, California 152 53.2 6.2 (41.1–65.3)
Adams County, Colorado 204 69.2 4.0 (61.4–77.0)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 204 69.4 3.6 (62.3–76.5)
Boulder County, Colorado 126 72.2 4.4 (63.5–80.9)
Denver County, Colorado 213 67.9 3.7 (60.7–75.1)
Douglas County, Colorado 101 67.9 5.2 (57.8–78.1)
El Paso County, Colorado 230 62.3 3.6 (55.2–69.4)
Jefferson County, Colorado 309 67.0 3.3 (60.6–73.4)
Larimer County, Colorado 170 70.3 3.8 (62.8–77.7)
Weld County, Colorado 123 59.6 5.3 (49.3–69.9)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 601 57.1 2.7 (51.8–62.4)
Hartford County, Connecticut 597 60.8 2.7 (55.6–66.1)
Litchfield County, Connecticut 210 62.5 4.1 (54.5–70.4)
New Haven County, Connecticut 626 57.3 2.7 (52.0–62.6)
New London County, Connecticut 355 62.3 3.8 (54.8–69.7)
Kent County, Delaware 484 59.3 2.8 (53.7–64.8)
New Castle County, Delaware 617 63.6 2.5 (58.7–68.5)
Sussex County, Delaware 581 64.1 2.3 (59.6–68.6)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 1,202 57.1 1.9 (53.3–60.9)
Broward County, Florida 176 51.6 5.7 (40.5–62.7)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 257 49.8 5.9 (38.2–61.3)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 381 53.1 3.6 (46.1–60.1)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 996 65.4 2.1 (61.3–69.5)
Kauai County, Hawaii 225 62.8 3.9 (55.1–70.6)
Maui County, Hawaii 363 57.7 3.8 (50.2–65.3)
Ada County, Idaho 248 55.5 4.2 (47.2–63.9)
Canyon County, Idaho 189 45.8 5.4 (35.3–56.3)
Cook County, Illinois 453 48.6 2.9 (42.9–54.3)
Lake County, Indiana 312 45.5 4.6 (36.5–54.5)
Marion County, Indiana 378 63.4 3.2 (57.1–69.7)
Polk County, Iowa 232 73.5 3.3 (67.0–80.0)
Johnson County, Kansas 660 70.1 2.0 (66.1–74.1)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 537 67.9 2.4 (63.2–72.5)
Shawnee County, Kansas 240 68.2 3.6 (61.1–75.2)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 321 59.2 3.7 (52.0–66.3)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 530 65.4 3.7 (58.1–72.7)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 181 59.7 4.5 (50.9–68.4)
Androscoggin County, Maine 187 68.7 4.0 (60.8–76.6)
Aroostook County, Maine 172 45.4 4.4 (36.7–54.1)
Cumberland County, Maine 516 60.5 2.6 (55.3–65.6)
Kennebec County, Maine 221 68.8 3.8 (61.4–76.2)
Penobscot County, Maine 253 59.0 3.6 (51.9–66.2)
York County, Maine 403 61.2 2.8 (55.7–66.7)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 253 65.0 3.8 (57.5–72.5)
Baltimore County, Maryland 454 63.9 2.9 (58.3–69.6)
Charles County, Maryland 118 60.5 6.2 (48.4–72.6)
Frederick County, Maryland 242 55.9 5.8 (44.5–67.3)
Montgomery County, Maryland 446 64.6 3.1 (58.5–70.7)
Prince George´s County, Maryland 305 54.7 4.2 (46.5–63.0)
Washington County, Maryland 199 66.4 4.9 (56.8–75.9)
Baltimore city, Maryland 223 66.1 4.4 (57.5–74.6)
Barnstable County, Massachusetts 252 58.9 4.0 (51.0–66.8)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 836 60.6 3.1 (54.6–66.6)
Essex County, Massachusetts 799 64.3 2.6 (59.1–69.4)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 539 62.2 3.5 (55.3–69.2)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,015 68.3 2.0 (64.4–72.3)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 490 66.8 3.2 (60.7–73.0)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 551 57.0 3.5 (50.2–63.7)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 548 60.5 3.4 (53.9–67.1)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 710 63.1 2.7 (57.8–68.5)
Kent County, Michigan 153 61.7 5.0 (51.9–71.5)
Macomb County, Michigan 191 60.6 4.0 (52.7–68.4)
Oakland County, Michigan 371 59.5 3.0 (53.6–65.5)
Wayne County, Michigan 750 46.5 3.0 (40.7–52.3)
Anoka County, Minnesota 116 62.7 5.8 (51.4–74.0)
Dakota County, Minnesota 145 74.7 4.0 (66.8–82.6)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 829 66.3 2.4 (61.6–70.9)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 583 71.2 2.6 (66.0–76.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 303 62.3 4.7 (53.1–71.5)
St. Louis County, Missouri 298 72.5 4.2 (64.3–80.7)
Cascade County, Montana 256 55.8 3.5 (48.8–62.7)
Flathead County, Montana 177 58.2 4.3 (49.8–66.5)
Hill County, Montana 179 58.7 5.5 (48.0–69.5)
Lake County, Montana 343 55.5 3.5 (48.6–62.4)
Missoula County, Montana 221 56.5 3.9 (48.8–64.2)
Yellowstone County, Montana 214 67.3 3.5 (60.4–74.3)
Dakota County, Nebraska 283 51.4 3.5 (44.6–58.3)
Douglas County, Nebraska 972 68.1 2.0 (64.3–72.0)
Hall County, Nebraska 190 60.1 5.3 (49.8–70.5)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 289 69.8 3.3 (63.4–76.3)
Lincoln County, Nebraska 252 51.6 4.4 (42.9–60.3)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 304 62.1 3.5 (55.3–68.9)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 248 54.8 4.3 (46.3–63.3)
Clark County, Nevada 511 50.6 2.8 (45.0–56.1)
Washoe County, Nevada 490 52.3 2.8 (46.8–57.8)
Belknap County, New Hampshire 236 55.5 4.0 (47.6–63.4)
Carroll County, New Hampshire 246 65.3 3.5 (58.3–72.2)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 212 59.7 4.1 (51.6–67.8)
Coos County, New Hampshire 212 55.6 4.0 (47.8–63.5)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 213 60.1 3.8 (52.6–67.6)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 534 56.8 2.6 (51.8–61.8)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 231 51.3 3.9 (43.6–59.0)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 326 62.8 3.1 (56.8–68.8)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 210 66.5 3.9 (58.8–74.1)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 341 58.0 3.5 (51.1–64.9)
Bergen County, New Jersey 220 58.3 4.5 (49.5–67.1)
Burlington County, New Jersey 201 66.9 4.2 (58.8–75.1)
Camden County, New Jersey 212 61.6 4.1 (53.4–69.7)
Cape May County, New Jersey 236 63.2 3.8 (55.8–70.7)
Cumberland County, New Jersey 159 61.7 5.0 (52.0–71.5)
Essex County, New Jersey 291 56.3 3.8 (48.7–63.8)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 137 70.5 5.1 (60.5–80.5)
Hudson County, New Jersey 259 49.4 4.2 (41.1–57.7)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 155 58.3 5.7 (47.2–69.4)
Mercer County, New Jersey 152 62.7 5.1 (52.8–72.7)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 199 67.7 4.2 (59.4–76.0)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 212 63.4 4.1 (55.3–71.5)
Morris County, New Jersey 240 74.9 3.4 (68.1–81.6)
Ocean County, New Jersey 244 62.6 3.6 (55.5–69.7)
Passaic County, New Jersey 140 56.8 5.0 (46.9–66.7)
Salem County, New Jersey 184 56.2 4.3 (47.8–64.5)
Somerset County, New Jersey 189 64.5 5.2 (54.4–74.6)
Sussex County, New Jersey 163 63.4 4.9 (53.9–72.9)
Union County, New Jersey 158 48.6 5.6 (37.7–59.5)
Warren County, New Jersey 167 66.1 4.1 (58.0–74.2)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 505 59.6 2.6 (54.6–64.6)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 203 61.1 3.9 (53.5–68.7)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 189 62.4 4.2 (54.2–70.7)
San Juan County, New Mexico 172 50.7 4.6 (41.7–59.6)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 195 62.4 4.0 (54.6–70.2)
Kings County, New York 60 37.3 7.9 (21.9–52.7)
Guilford County, North Carolina 146 72.4 4.5 (63.5–81.2)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 131 70.0 4.8 (60.5–79.5)
Robeson County, North Carolina 155 47.5 5.9 (35.9–59.1)
Wake County, North Carolina 118 73.5 5.0 (63.6–83.3)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 168 57.0 4.9 (47.4–66.6)
Cass County, North Dakota 236 63.2 4.0 (55.4–70.9)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 221 59.7 4.2 (51.5–67.8)
Franklin County, Ohio 177 63.9 4.6 (55.0–72.9)
Hamilton County, Ohio 202 67.1 4.1 (59.0–75.2)
Lorain County, Ohio 222 66.6 4.4 (58.1–75.1)
Lucas County, Ohio 198 64.3 4.3 (56.0–72.7)
Mahoning County, Ohio 227 45.8 4.6 (36.7–54.8)
Montgomery County, Ohio 228 54.5 4.1 (46.5–62.5)
Stark County, Ohio 199 60.0 4.4 (51.4–68.7)
Summit County, Ohio 197 62.8 4.1 (54.8–70.7)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 285 68.9 3.2 (62.7–75.2)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 365 66.9 2.9 (61.3–72.5)
Clackamas County, Oregon 164 53.5 4.7 (44.3–62.6)
Lane County, Oregon 176 49.9 4.5 (41.2–58.7)
Multnomah County, Oregon 234 62.2 3.9 (54.6–69.8)
Washington County, Oregon 177 54.8 4.8 (45.4–64.2)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 662 60.8 2.3 (56.4–65.2)
Bradford County, Pennsylvania 690 52.2 2.1 (48.0–56.4)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 134 67.9 4.7 (58.6–77.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 566 54.3 2.8 (48.9–59.7)
Pike County, Pennsylvania 754 54.9 1.9 (51.1–58.6)
Kent County, Rhode Island 227 56.2 3.9 (48.5–63.8)
Providence County, Rhode Island 940 57.1 2.0 (53.1–61.1)
Washington County, Rhode Island 241 62.6 3.5 (55.8–69.5)
Aiken County, South Carolina 201 58.8 4.3 (50.4–67.3)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 429 60.4 2.8 (55.0–65.8)
Charleston County, South Carolina 337 66.9 3.6 (59.8–73.9)
Greenville County, South Carolina 261 63.0 4.1 (55.0–71.0)
Horry County, South Carolina 274 58.1 3.4 (51.4–64.8)
Richland County, South Carolina 280 62.4 4.4 (53.9–71.0)
Spartanburg County, South Carolina 219 53.8 5.0 (44.0–63.6)
Lincoln County, South Dakota 129 75.1 5.3 (64.8–85.5)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 153 65.7 4.5 (56.8–74.6)
Pennington County, South Dakota 147 66.5 4.5 (57.7–75.4)
Davidson County, Tennessee 147 71.0 4.5 (62.1–79.9)
Shelby County, Tennessee 128 69.3 4.8 (60.0–78.7)
Bexar County, Texas 167 61.2 5.1 (51.2–71.2)
Dallas County, Texas 126 52.3 5.5 (41.4–63.1)
El Paso County, Texas 195 50.9 4.9 (41.4–60.4)
Harris County, Texas 128 59.3 5.2 (49.1–69.5)
Hidalgo County, Texas 189 63.8 4.3 (55.4–72.2)
Tarrant County, Texas 152 64.9 4.9 (55.3–74.5)
Travis County, Texas 296 59.6 3.7 (52.5–66.8)
Davis County, Utah 266 51.4 3.4 (44.8–58.1)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,018 59.1 1.9 (55.4–62.7)
Tooele County, Utah 150 52.8 6.5 (40.0–65.6)
Utah County, Utah 360 50.6 3.0 (44.8–56.4)
Wasatch County, Utah 154 58.6 4.4 (50.0–67.2)
Weber County, Utah 285 61.6 3.4 (54.9–68.3)
Chittenden County, Vermont 238 66.7 3.6 (59.7–73.7)
Rutland County, Vermont 194 59.7 4.2 (51.4–68.0)
Washington County, Vermont 135 68.8 4.6 (59.8–77.7)
Windsor County, Vermont 206 65.2 3.7 (57.9–72.5)
Fairfax County, Virginia 163 61.9 5.0 (52.2–71.6)
Clark County, Washington 238 66.7 3.6 (59.6–73.9)
King County, Washington 1,106 60.8 1.9 (57.0–64.6)
Kitsap County, Washington 201 65.2 3.9 (57.4–72.9)
Pierce County, Washington 314 60.6 3.4 (54.0–67.2)
Snohomish County, Washington 293 60.3 3.7 (53.0–67.5)
Spokane County, Washington 327 60.1 3.2 (53.9–66.4)
Thurston County, Washington 158 53.1 5.0 (43.3–62.9)
Whatcom County, Washington 278 60.5 3.5 (53.6–67.4)
Yakima County, Washington 169 60.4 4.5 (51.5–69.3)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 198 77.6 3.4 (70.8–84.3)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 235 61.8 4.7 (52.6–71.0)
Laramie County, Wyoming 390 62.1 3.5 (55.2–69.0)
Natrona County, Wyoming 318 50.7 4.2 (42.5–58.9)
San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico 210 24.1 3.3 (17.6–30.6)
Median 60.8
Range 24.1–77.6

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 13. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 2,998 67.1 1.1 (64.8–69.3)
Alaska 714 62.5 2.5 (57.6–67.5)
Arizona 2,713 66.2 1.5 (63.3–69.0)
Arkansas 1,846 63.5 1.4 (60.7–66.3)
California 3,658 67.5 1.2 (65.1–69.9)
Colorado 3,193 73.8 1.0 (71.9–75.7)
Connecticut 2,546 67.6 1.3 (65.1–70.1)
Delaware 1,624 70.7 1.5 (67.7–73.6)
District of Columbia 1,109 64.0 2.1 (59.9–68.1)
Florida 2,852 65.8 1.4 (63.0–68.5)
Georgia 1,774 66.2 1.5 (63.3–69.1)
Hawaii 1,830 65.1 1.7 (61.8–68.5)
Idaho 2,071 68.5 1.6 (65.4–71.6)
Illinois 1,907 63.7 1.5 (60.8–66.6)
Indiana 2,589 68.0 1.1 (65.7–70.2)
Iowa 2,332 70.8 1.0 (68.7–72.8)
Kansas 3,787 70.3 0.9 (68.6–72.0)
Kentucky 3,184 65.6 1.3 (63.0–68.1)
Louisiana 3,111 67.7 1.3 (65.2–70.2)
Maine 2,985 70.7 1.0 (68.7–72.7)
Maryland 3,893 67.4 1.2 (65.1–69.7)
Massachusetts 5,710 70.2 0.9 (68.4–72.0)
Michigan 3,383 66.8 1.0 (64.7–68.8)
Minnesota 3,146 73.6 1.0 (71.5–75.6)
Mississippi 2,721 65.8 1.2 (63.5–68.1)
Missouri 2,305 71.1 1.4 (68.4–73.8)
Montana 2,674 69.5 1.1 (67.2–71.7)
Nebraska 6,413 70.0 0.8 (68.4–71.6)
Nevada 1,464 64.1 2.1 (59.9–68.3)
New Hampshire 2,464 75.0 1.1 (72.9–77.2)
New Jersey 4,036 61.6 1.1 (59.4–63.9)
New Mexico 2,392 70.8 1.1 (68.7–73.0)
New York 1,585 67.1 1.8 (63.5–70.6)
North Carolina 3,482 70.2 1.0 (68.2–72.1)
North Dakota 1,496 68.8 1.5 (65.9–71.7)
Ohio 3,800 69.5 1.0 (67.4–71.5)
Oklahoma 2,509 74.9 1.0 (72.9–77.0)
Oregon 1,688 76.2 1.2 (73.8–78.6)
Pennsylvania 6,171 71.1 0.9 (69.4–72.8)
Rhode Island 1,564 71.4 1.5 (68.5–74.3)
South Carolina 4,166 69.4 1.1 (67.3–71.5)
South Dakota 2,262 64.1 1.9 (60.3–67.9)
Tennessee 2,197 69.6 1.4 (66.9–72.3)
Texas 2,529 70.3 1.2 (67.9–72.8)
Utah 3,172 70.1 1.0 (68.1–72.1)
Vermont 1,864 70.8 1.3 (68.2–73.3)
Virginia 2,088 65.7 1.3 (63.2–68.2)
Washington 4,651 72.8 0.9 (71.1–74.5)
West Virginia 1,648 68.0 1.3 (65.4–70.5)
Wisconsin 1,527 70.4 1.8 (67.0–73.9)
Wyoming 2,280 68.4 1.5 (65.4–71.3)
Guam 202 39.5 4.8 (30.2–48.9)
Puerto Rico 1,739 22.2 1.1 (19.9–24.4)
Median 68.5
Range 22.2–76.2

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 14. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
MMSA(s) Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico 156 15.3 3.4 (8.6–21.9)
Akron, Ohio 220 70.6 3.9 (62.9–78.3)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 829 77.0 1.8 (73.5–80.4)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 393 72.6 3.0 (66.7–78.5)
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California* 264 67.4 4.9 (57.8–76.9)
Anchorage, Alaska 224 67.1 3.9 (59.4–74.8)
Asheville, North Carolina 211 73.7 3.4 (67.0–80.4)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 641 64.5 2.5 (59.5–69.4)
Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey 331 64.1 3.6 (56.9–71.2)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 342 71.5 4.1 (63.5–79.4)
Augusta-Waterville, Maine 212 75.9 3.6 (68.9–82.9)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 375 79.4 2.9 (73.6–85.1)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 1,327 69.0 1.7 (65.6–72.4)
Bangor, Maine 243 67.7 3.6 (60.6–74.8)
Barnstable Town, Massachusetts 247 62.7 3.9 (55.0–70.4)
Barre, Vermont 126 65.7 5.2 (55.5–75.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 481 70.4 3.0 (64.5–76.2)
Bellingham, Washington 271 76.6 3.2 (70.4–82.9)
Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont 261 73.0 3.1 (66.9–79.0)
Billings, Montana 241 78.3 3.0 (72.4–84.2)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 551 69.5 2.5 (64.5–74.4)
Bismarck, North Dakota 242 63.1 4.0 (55.2–71.0)
Boise City, Idaho 480 74.2 2.8 (68.7–79.7)
Boston, Massachusetts* 1,476 66.3 1.9 (62.5–70.0)
Boulder, Colorado 120 67.3 4.6 (58.2–76.3)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 191 77.9 3.3 (71.5–84.3)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 567 61.7 2.8 (56.3–67.2)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 403 69.4 2.8 (63.9–74.9)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts* 1,709 74.8 1.5 (71.9–77.8)
Camden, New Jersey* 518 67.0 2.7 (61.7–72.4)
Canton-Massillon, Ohio 211 63.3 4.4 (54.8–71.9)
Casper, Wyoming 313 76.8 3.6 (69.8–83.8)
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 190 75.5 3.3 (69.0–82.0)
Charleston, West Virginia 231 76.9 3.0 (70.9–82.8)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 513 73.7 2.8 (68.2–79.2)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 651 68.3 2.4 (63.5–73.0)
Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia 218 70.0 4.2 (61.8–78.1)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 374 67.5 3.8 (60.0–74.9)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 1,113 59.4 2.1 (55.2–63.6)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 613 73.6 2.5 (68.7–78.4)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 664 71.0 2.1 (66.9–75.0)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 515 72.1 2.8 (66.7–77.5)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 268 69.3 3.4 (62.7–75.9)
Columbia, South Carolina 506 74.4 2.8 (68.8–79.9)
Columbus, Ohio 383 70.8 2.9 (65.0–76.5)
Concord, New Hampshire 222 74.3 3.5 (67.5–81.1)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas* 203 76.5 3.5 (69.7–83.3)
Dayton, Ohio 268 68.9 3.5 (62.0–75.9)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 1,091 78.0 1.5 (75.1–81.0)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 333 75.5 2.5 (70.6–80.5)
Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Michigan* 726 55.7 3.1 (49.5–61.8)
Dover, Delaware 465 72.7 2.7 (67.5–77.9)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 147 72.5 4.6 (63.4–81.5)
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina 198 76.9 3.4 (70.3–83.5)
El Paso, Texas 186 57.0 5.1 (47.1–66.9)
Eugene, Oregon 169 83.4 3.4 (76.7–90.1)
Fairbanks, Alaska 89 67.5 6.2 (55.3–79.7)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 252 70.1 4.2 (61.9–78.3)
Farmington, New Mexico 166 71.7 4.1 (63.6–79.8)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 120 69.6 4.9 (60.0–79.2)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 281 68.6 3.7 (61.3–75.8)
Fort Collins, Colorado 158 77.4 3.6 (70.3–84.6)
Fort Wayne, Indiana 141 61.7 4.6 (52.7–70.8)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas* 213 70.7 3.9 (63.0–78.4)
Grand Island, Nebraska 300 63.3 3.9 (55.6–71.0)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 262 71.8 3.4 (65.2–78.4)
Great Falls, Montana 249 65.3 3.5 (58.5–72.2)
Greeley, Colorado 119 65.1 5.5 (54.4–75.8)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 242 73.6 3.2 (67.3–79.8)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 526 65.9 2.9 (60.3–71.6)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 250 68.4 3.4 (61.6–75.1)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 248 67.9 4.3 (59.5–76.3)
Harrisburg-Carlisle, Pennsylvania 175 65.0 4.1 (57.0–73.1)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 765 71.1 2.2 (66.7–75.5)
Heber, Utah 153 75.2 3.6 (68.2–82.3)
Hilo, Hawaii 358 61.1 3.6 (53.9–68.2)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 467 65.5 2.6 (60.3–70.6)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 210 69.3 3.8 (61.9–76.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 340 71.5 2.8 (66.1–76.9)
Huntsville, Alabama 147 61.6 5.3 (51.2–72.0)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 166 59.2 5.2 (49.0–69.3)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 611 74.3 2.2 (70.0–78.6)
Jackson, Mississippi 267 68.6 3.4 (62.0–75.3)
Jacksonville, Florida 160 69.5 4.5 (60.7–78.3)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 341 59.2 4.6 (50.2–68.2)
Kalispell, Montana 168 66.9 4.4 (58.3–75.4)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1,472 74.5 2.1 (70.4–78.5)
Kapaa, Hawaii 209 67.8 4.0 (59.9–75.6)
Keene, New Hampshire 204 73.5 3.5 (66.6–80.3)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 150 72.4 4.4 (63.7–81.0)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 187 77.2 3.9 (69.6–84.8)
Knoxville, Tennessee 262 70.9 3.8 (63.4–78.4)
Laconia, New Hampshire 228 70.3 3.9 (62.6–77.8)
Lafayette, Louisiana 160 62.4 5.2 (52.1–72.6)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 197 70.3 3.6 (63.1–77.4)
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nevada 487 60.4 3.0 (54.5–66.3)
Lewiston-Auburn, Maine 183 77.9 3.6 (70.7–85.0)
Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 113 62.8 6.3 (50.5–75.1)
Lincoln, Nebraska 351 74.3 2.7 (69.0–79.7)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 361 63.9 3.2 (57.6–70.2)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 127 59.8 5.2 (49.7–70.0)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California* 723 65.4 2.8 (60.0–70.8)
Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 625 69.7 2.9 (64.1–75.4)
Lumberton, North Carolina 151 52.5 6.3 (40.3–64.8)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 510 75.3 2.1 (71.1–79.5)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas 175 56.1 5.1 (46.2–66.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 397 66.7 3.5 (59.8–73.7)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 557 55.9 3.4 (49.3–62.5)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 306 70.9 3.9 (63.2–78.5)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,882 74.3 1.5 (71.4–77.2)
Missoula, Montana 214 70.7 3.8 (63.3–78.0)
Mobile, Alabama 295 80.0 2.8 (74.4–85.5)
Montgomery, Alabama 168 71.5 4.2 (63.2–79.8)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania* 335 74.7 2.8 (69.2–80.1)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 336 73.3 2.8 (67.9–78.7)
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 317 71.9 3.2 (65.5–78.2)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York* 248 64.4 4.0 (56.6–72.3)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania* 1,843 62.1 2.1 (58.0–66.3)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 600 68.3 2.4 (63.5–73.1)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 386 67.7 2.9 (62.0–73.5)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey* 1,612 61.5 2.4 (56.7–66.3)
Norfolk, Nebraska 193 68.7 4.0 (60.8–76.6)
North Platte, Nebraska 256 60.0 4.5 (51.1–68.8)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 342 66.1 3.8 (58.6–73.6)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California* 253 72.5 4.7 (63.3–81.7)
Ocean City, New Jersey 225 65.7 4.0 (57.9–73.6)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 608 69.0 2.2 (64.8–73.3)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 613 78.3 2.0 (74.3–82.3)
Olympia-Tumwater, Washington 148 79.0 3.7 (71.8–86.2)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,466 73.9 1.5 (70.9–76.9)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 196 70.5 4.8 (61.1–80.0)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania* 633 66.3 2.5 (61.3–71.2)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 813 65.3 2.2 (60.9–69.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,098 75.3 1.6 (72.3–78.4)
Ponce, Puerto Rico 147 19.0 3.6 (11.9–26.1)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 1,001 71.2 1.7 (67.9–74.6)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 877 75.0 1.8 (71.5–78.6)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 2,364 70.5 1.4 (67.8–73.1)
Provo-Orem, Utah 378 68.9 2.8 (63.5–74.4)
Raleigh, North Carolina 176 70.1 4.4 (61.5–78.6)
Rapid City, South Dakota 291 64.7 4.0 (56.8–72.6)
Reno, Nevada 473 78.3 2.3 (73.8–82.9)
Richmond, Virginia 301 68.2 3.1 (62.2–74.2)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 382 66.9 3.8 (59.5–74.3)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire* 504 78.5 2.2 (74.2–82.9)
Rutland, Vermont 190 74.5 3.9 (66.8–82.2)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 254 73.3 4.0 (65.5–81.1)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 638 70.8 2.6 (65.7–76.0)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 841 74.3 1.8 (70.8–77.9)
Salt Lake City, Utah 1,131 74.1 1.7 (70.8–77.3)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 220 68.2 4.2 (59.9–76.5)
San Diego-Carlsbad, California 292 70.5 3.9 (62.9–78.0)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California* 149 60.8 6.5 (48.1–73.5)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 160 65.0 5.8 (53.7–76.3)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 1,079 23.6 1.5 (20.7–26.6)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 184 72.0 3.8 (64.6–79.5)
Sayre, Pennsylvania 656 64.6 2.0 (60.7–68.6)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 261 66.0 3.9 (58.4–73.5)
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pennsylvania 252 65.9 3.8 (58.4–73.4)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington* 1,304 69.6 1.8 (66.0–73.2)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 187 71.0 4.0 (63.2–78.8)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland* 660 70.3 2.5 (65.5–75.2)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 432 65.7 4.7 (56.5–75.0)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 289 67.3 4.1 (59.2–75.4)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 232 75.8 3.9 (68.1–83.5)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 357 74.8 2.7 (69.6–80.0)
Springfield, Massachusetts 608 68.0 3.1 (61.9–74.2)
Tacoma-Lakewood, Washington* 301 75.0 3.1 (68.9–81.1)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 292 71.0 3.6 (63.9–78.1)
Toledo, Ohio 291 71.8 3.4 (65.1–78.4)
Topeka, Kansas 325 69.8 3.0 (63.9–75.8)
Torrington, Connecticut 201 74.1 3.6 (66.9–81.2)
Trenton, New Jersey 144 63.7 5.2 (53.6–73.8)
Tucson, Arizona 360 70.0 3.1 (63.9–76.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 518 76.0 2.2 (71.8–80.3)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 191 72.3 3.7 (65.1–79.5)
Urban Honolulu, Hawaii 922 67.0 2.1 (62.8–71.2)
Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey 150 65.4 5.1 (55.3–75.4)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 428 61.5 3.0 (55.6–67.3)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan* 651 66.0 2.2 (61.6–70.4)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia* 2,111 65.1 1.8 (61.7–68.6)
Wichita, Kansas 718 75.2 1.8 (71.6–78.8)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey* 868 65.8 2.3 (61.3–70.2)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 249 75.1 3.2 (68.8–81.5)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 741 73.6 2.3 (69.1–78.2)
Yakima, Washington 156 73.0 4.2 (64.8–81.2)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 327 62.2 4.1 (54.3–70.2)
Median 70.0
Range 15.3–83.4

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Metropolitan division.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 15. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
County Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Jefferson County, Alabama 259 71.6 3.3 (65.1–78.2)
Madison County, Alabama 125 62.7 6.0 (51.0–74.5)
Mobile County, Alabama 295 80.0 2.8 (74.4–85.5)
Anchorage Municipality, Alaska 123 66.5 5.0 (56.8–76.3)
Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska 89 67.5 6.2 (55.3–79.7)
Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska 101 67.1 5.7 (55.8–78.3)
Maricopa County, Arizona 592 65.1 2.4 (60.3–69.8)
Pima County, Arizona 360 70.0 3.1 (63.9–76.2)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 240 67.1 4.0 (59.3–74.9)
Alameda County, California 154 75.4 5.6 (64.5–86.4)
Los Angeles County, California 723 65.4 2.8 (60.0–70.8)
Orange County, California 264 67.4 4.9 (57.8–76.9)
Riverside County, California 234 66.6 5.2 (56.3–76.9)
Sacramento County, California 147 76.7 5.5 (66.0–87.5)
San Bernardino County, California 148 67.3 5.3 (57.0–77.7)
San Diego County, California 292 70.5 3.9 (62.9–78.0)
Santa Clara County, California 150 64.2 6.0 (52.5–75.9)
Adams County, Colorado 197 74.0 3.9 (66.4–81.6)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 194 76.9 3.5 (70.1–83.8)
Boulder County, Colorado 120 67.3 4.6 (58.2–76.3)
Denver County, Colorado 198 85.2 2.8 (79.7–90.7)
Douglas County, Colorado 92 78.9 4.6 (69.8–88.0)
El Paso County, Colorado 215 69.3 3.6 (62.3–76.2)
Jefferson County, Colorado 292 75.3 3.0 (69.4–81.2)
Larimer County, Colorado 158 77.4 3.6 (70.3–84.6)
Weld County, Colorado 119 65.1 5.5 (54.3–75.8)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 567 61.7 2.8 (56.3–67.2)
Hartford County, Connecticut 554 71.0 2.7 (65.6–76.3)
Litchfield County, Connecticut 201 74.1 3.6 (66.9–81.2)
New Haven County, Connecticut 600 68.3 2.5 (63.5–73.1)
New London County, Connecticut 342 66.1 3.8 (58.6–73.6)
Kent County, Delaware 465 72.7 2.7 (67.5–77.9)
New Castle County, Delaware 596 66.5 2.5 (61.6–71.4)
Sussex County, Delaware 563 75.9 2.1 (71.8–80.1)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 1,109 64.0 2.1 (59.9–68.1)
Broward County, Florida 167 52.4 5.7 (41.1–63.6)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 243 52.0 6.0 (40.2–63.8)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 358 61.1 3.6 (53.9–68.2)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 922 67.0 2.1 (62.8–71.2)
Kauai County, Hawaii 209 67.8 4.0 (59.9–75.6)
Maui County, Hawaii 341 59.2 4.6 (50.2–68.2)
Ada County, Idaho 242 74.1 4.0 (66.3–81.8)
Canyon County, Idaho 183 77.0 3.6 (69.9–84.0)
Cook County, Illinois 441 59.4 3.0 (53.6–65.2)
Lake County, Indiana 304 53.7 4.5 (44.9–62.5)
Marion County, Indiana 365 75.4 3.1 (69.4–81.3)
Polk County, Iowa 224 78.1 2.9 (72.4–83.9)
Johnson County, Kansas 633 76.1 2.0 (72.2–79.9)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 517 76.4 2.2 (72.1–80.7)
Shawnee County, Kansas 232 73.7 3.6 (66.7–80.8)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 311 71.8 3.3 (65.4–78.3)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 513 71.1 3.6 (63.9–78.2)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 176 68.9 4.2 (60.7–77.1)
Androscoggin County, Maine 183 77.9 3.6 (70.7–85.0)
Aroostook County, Maine 168 63.9 4.4 (55.2–72.6)
Cumberland County, Maine 497 71.9 2.4 (67.2–76.6)
Kennebec County, Maine 212 75.9 3.6 (68.9–82.9)
Penobscot County, Maine 243 67.7 3.6 (60.6–74.8)
York County, Maine 379 69.3 2.8 (63.9–74.8)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 246 67.8 3.7 (60.5–75.2)
Baltimore County, Maryland 434 68.3 2.9 (62.5–74.1)
Charles County, Maryland 109 72.0 5.3 (61.7–82.3)
Frederick County, Maryland 237 65.7 5.9 (54.1–77.3)
Montgomery County, Maryland 423 71.3 2.7 (66.1–76.6)
Prince George´s County, Maryland 293 56.0 4.4 (47.4–64.5)
Washington County, Maryland 187 77.0 5.1 (66.9–87.1)
Baltimore city, Maryland 213 76.0 3.5 (69.1–82.9)
Barnstable County, Massachusetts 247 62.7 3.9 (55.0–70.4)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 800 69.1 2.8 (63.7–74.6)
Essex County, Massachusetts 764 69.4 2.6 (64.2–74.6)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 519 65.6 3.6 (58.5–72.7)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 945 77.9 1.8 (74.4–81.4)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 466 71.7 3.0 (65.8–77.7)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 509 67.6 3.3 (61.1–74.1)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 501 55.5 3.5 (48.6–62.4)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 670 74.3 2.5 (69.4–79.1)
Kent County, Michigan 148 73.9 4.7 (64.8–83.1)
Macomb County, Michigan 185 71.3 3.8 (63.8–78.7)
Oakland County, Michigan 359 66.0 3.0 (60.2–71.8)
Wayne County, Michigan 726 55.7 3.1 (49.6–61.8)
Anoka County, Minnesota 114 72.2 5.5 (61.5–83.0)
Dakota County, Minnesota 137 76.5 5.3 (66.1–86.8)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 761 73.4 2.4 (68.8–78.1)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 550 74.9 2.8 (69.3–80.4)
Jackson County, Missouri 288 71.2 4.3 (62.7–79.6)
St. Louis County, Missouri 283 68.6 4.4 (59.9–77.2)
Cascade County, Montana 249 65.3 3.5 (58.5–72.2)
Flathead County, Montana 168 66.9 4.4 (58.3–75.4)
Hill County, Montana 168 57.4 5.6 (46.4–68.5)
Lake County, Montana 333 68.2 3.6 (61.2–75.2)
Missoula County, Montana 214 70.7 3.8 (63.3–78.1)
Yellowstone County, Montana 206 77.7 3.3 (71.3–84.1)
Dakota County, Nebraska 274 62.3 3.5 (55.4–69.2)
Douglas County, Nebraska 945 72.6 1.9 (68.8–76.4)
Hall County, Nebraska 183 61.1 5.5 (50.4–71.8)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 276 74.5 2.9 (68.8–80.2)
Lincoln County, Nebraska 247 60.7 4.6 (51.7–69.7)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 291 72.1 3.3 (65.6–78.6)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 242 65.5 4.0 (57.7–73.3)
Clark County, Nevada 487 60.4 3.0 (54.5–66.3)
Washoe County, Nevada 466 78.4 2.4 (73.8–83.1)
Belknap County, New Hampshire 228 70.3 3.9 (62.6–77.9)
Carroll County, New Hampshire 236 73.5 3.3 (67.1–79.9)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 204 73.5 3.5 (66.6–80.3)
Coos County, New Hampshire 202 71.8 3.5 (64.9–78.7)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 200 73.7 3.7 (66.6–80.9)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 510 75.3 2.1 (71.1–79.5)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 222 74.3 3.4 (67.6–81.1)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 306 77.5 2.8 (72.0–83.0)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 198 81.1 3.4 (74.5–87.7)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 331 64.1 3.7 (56.9–71.2)
Bergen County, New Jersey 207 53.6 4.5 (44.8–62.4)
Burlington County, New Jersey 187 67.1 4.8 (57.8–76.5)
Camden County, New Jersey 200 64.8 4.2 (56.6–72.9)
Cape May County, New Jersey 225 65.7 4.0 (57.9–73.6)
Cumberland County, New Jersey 150 65.4 5.1 (55.3–75.4)
Essex County, New Jersey 273 63.6 3.9 (56.1–71.2)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 131 72.0 4.9 (62.4–81.6)
Hudson County, New Jersey 244 58.4 4.2 (50.2–66.6)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 149 61.7 5.7 (50.6–72.8)
Mercer County, New Jersey 144 63.7 5.2 (53.6–73.9)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 192 65.0 4.8 (55.6–74.4)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 201 62.7 4.3 (54.3–71.0)
Morris County, New Jersey 215 68.0 4.5 (59.2–76.8)
Ocean County, New Jersey 231 65.0 3.7 (57.7–72.2)
Passaic County, New Jersey 135 47.8 5.1 (37.9–57.8)
Salem County, New Jersey 183 67.0 4.1 (59.0–75.0)
Somerset County, New Jersey 181 66.2 4.9 (56.7–75.7)
Sussex County, New Jersey 154 69.5 4.8 (60.1–79.0)
Union County, New Jersey 148 50.7 5.8 (39.2–62.1)
Warren County, New Jersey 155 69.8 4.3 (61.4–78.3)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 492 78.2 2.1 (74.0–82.4)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 197 70.3 3.6 (63.1–77.4)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 176 79.2 3.4 (72.6–85.8)
San Juan County, New Mexico 166 71.7 4.1 (63.6–79.8)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 184 72.0 3.8 (64.6–79.5)
Kings County, New York 57 60.8 9.5 (42.1–79.4)
Guilford County, North Carolina 143 67.9 4.8 (58.5–77.3)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 125 73.1 4.6 (64.1–82.1)
Robeson County, North Carolina 151 52.5 6.3 (40.2–64.9)
Wake County, North Carolina 113 68.9 5.3 (58.5–79.4)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 161 66.4 5.0 (56.6–76.2)
Cass County, North Dakota 225 70.9 4.1 (62.8–79.0)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 214 72.9 3.6 (65.8–79.9)
Franklin County, Ohio 171 73.1 4.2 (64.8–81.3)
Hamilton County, Ohio 194 77.1 3.9 (69.5–84.7)
Lorain County, Ohio 213 74.3 3.8 (66.9–81.7)
Lucas County, Ohio 191 69.5 4.4 (60.8–78.2)
Mahoning County, Ohio 219 59.4 4.8 (50.1–68.7)
Montgomery County, Ohio 221 67.5 4.0 (59.7–75.4)
Stark County, Ohio 195 64.5 4.5 (55.6–73.3)
Summit County, Ohio 193 72.3 3.8 (64.8–79.8)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 279 81.4 2.7 (76.1–86.6)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 353 74.7 2.7 (69.4–80.0)
Clackamas County, Oregon 160 67.3 4.8 (57.9–76.7)
Lane County, Oregon 169 83.4 3.4 (76.7–90.1)
Multnomah County, Oregon 221 80.1 3.1 (74.0–86.3)
Washington County, Oregon 167 78.7 3.7 (71.4–86.0)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 645 78.6 1.9 (74.9–82.3)
Bradford County, Pennsylvania 656 64.7 2.0 (60.7–68.6)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 130 84.8 3.2 (78.5–91.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 533 64.8 2.8 (59.4–70.1)
Pike County, Pennsylvania 723 65.7 1.9 (62.1–69.4)
Kent County, Rhode Island 217 67.0 4.0 (59.1–74.9)
Providence County, Rhode Island 902 72.4 1.9 (68.6–76.2)
Washington County, Rhode Island 231 73.5 3.4 (66.9–80.1)
Aiken County, South Carolina 193 68.9 4.3 (60.5–77.2)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 412 65.2 2.8 (59.7–70.6)
Charleston County, South Carolina 318 70.4 3.6 (63.3–77.5)
Greenville County, South Carolina 252 67.6 4.0 (59.8–75.5)
Horry County, South Carolina 261 70.1 3.2 (63.8–76.4)
Richland County, South Carolina 271 73.4 3.9 (65.7–81.1)
Spartanburg County, South Carolina 214 73.6 4.4 (65.0–82.2)
Lincoln County, South Dakota 128 55.1 7.9 (39.7–70.5)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 143 70.5 4.6 (61.6–79.4)
Pennington County, South Dakota 144 63.7 4.7 (54.5–72.8)
Davidson County, Tennessee 145 73.8 5.0 (64.1–83.6)
Shelby County, Tennessee 124 63.7 5.0 (53.8–73.5)
Bexar County, Texas 153 71.8 4.9 (62.2–81.5)
Dallas County, Texas 118 71.2 4.9 (61.6–80.7)
El Paso County, Texas 186 57.0 5.0 (47.1–66.9)
Harris County, Texas 122 71.2 4.7 (61.9–80.4)
Hidalgo County, Texas 175 56.1 5.0 (46.2–66.0)
Tarrant County, Texas 146 69.5 5.1 (59.5–79.5)
Travis County, Texas 274 81.2 2.8 (75.7–86.8)
Davis County, Utah 252 67.9 3.2 (61.6–74.2)
Salt Lake County, Utah 983 74.1 1.7 (70.7–77.6)
Tooele County, Utah 148 73.3 4.5 (64.4–82.1)
Utah County, Utah 351 68.8 2.9 (63.2–74.5)
Wasatch County, Utah 153 75.2 3.6 (68.2–82.3)
Weber County, Utah 277 72.7 3.2 (66.5–79.0)
Chittenden County, Vermont 225 66.8 3.6 (59.7–73.9)
Rutland County, Vermont 190 74.5 3.9 (66.8–82.2)
Washington County, Vermont 126 65.7 5.2 (55.5–75.9)
Windsor County, Vermont 196 69.1 3.8 (61.6–76.6)
Fairfax County, Virginia 154 71.2 4.2 (62.9–79.5)
Clark County, Washington 230 75.4 3.2 (69.2–81.7)
King County, Washington 1,033 68.7 2.2 (64.5–73.0)
Kitsap County, Washington 191 77.9 3.3 (71.5–84.3)
Pierce County, Washington 301 75.0 3.1 (68.9–81.1)
Snohomish County, Washington 271 72.8 3.4 (66.2–79.4)
Spokane County, Washington 311 75.9 2.8 (70.3–81.4)
Thurston County, Washington 148 79.0 3.7 (71.8–86.2)
Whatcom County, Washington 271 76.6 3.2 (70.4–82.9)
Yakima County, Washington 156 73.0 4.2 (64.8–81.2)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 193 78.2 3.3 (71.8–84.6)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 228 75.9 4.0 (68.1–83.7)
Laramie County, Wyoming 374 67.5 3.8 (60.0–74.9)
Natrona County, Wyoming 313 76.8 3.6 (69.8–83.8)
San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico 204 25.8 3.6 (18.7–32.8)
Median 70.1
Range 25.8–85.2

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 16. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have visited a dentist, dental hygienist, or dental clinic within the past year, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 8,893 58.6 0.8 (57.1–60.2)
Alaska 4,295 67.4 1.0 (65.5–69.4)
Arizona 7,262 61.6 1.0 (59.7–63.5)
Arkansas 5,080 54.9 1.0 (53.0–56.8)
California 14,556 67.0 0.6 (65.8–68.1)
Colorado 12,154 65.3 0.6 (64.1–66.4)
Connecticut 8,699 76.1 0.7 (74.8–77.4)
Delaware 5,152 70.0 0.9 (68.3–71.8)
District of Columbia 3,801 71.1 1.2 (68.7–73.6)
Florida 7,571 59.8 0.9 (58.0–61.5)
Georgia 6,016 64.1 0.9 (62.4–65.8)
Hawaii 7,558 70.4 0.8 (68.8–72.0)
Idaho 5,862 67.6 1.1 (65.4–69.7)
Illinois 5,568 66.9 0.9 (65.1–68.8)
Indiana 8,576 62.6 0.7 (61.3–64.0)
Iowa 7,121 71.1 0.7 (69.8–72.5)
Kansas 11,680 67.3 0.6 (66.1–68.5)
Kentucky 11,030 60.3 0.7 (58.9–61.7)
Louisiana 8,872 56.1 0.9 (54.4–57.8)
Maine 9,873 65.3 0.6 (64.1–66.5)
Maryland 12,689 72.7 0.7 (71.3–74.1)
Massachusetts 21,523 76.2 0.5 (75.3–77.1)
Michigan 10,401 68.0 0.7 (66.8–69.3)
Minnesota 12,167 74.8 0.6 (73.7–75.9)
Mississippi 7,684 55.4 0.8 (53.8–57.1)
Missouri 6,698 61.8 0.9 (60.1–63.5)
Montana 8,610 61.0 0.7 (59.6–62.3)
Nebraska 19,052 67.6 0.5 (66.6–68.6)
Nevada 4,798 60.8 1.0 (58.8–62.9)
New Hampshire 7,450 73.1 0.8 (71.5–74.6)
New Jersey 15,598 71.2 0.5 (70.1–72.3)
New Mexico 8,709 60.9 0.7 (59.6–62.3)
New York 6,020 67.5 0.9 (65.8–69.3)
North Carolina 11,712 64.9 0.6 (63.8–66.0)
North Dakota 4,845 67.2 0.9 (65.3–69.0)
Ohio 12,899 67.6 0.6 (66.4–68.7)
Oklahoma 7,973 58.9 0.7 (57.5–60.3)
Oregon 5,225 65.3 0.9 (63.5–67.0)
Pennsylvania 19,812 68.5 0.5 (67.5–69.5)
Rhode Island 5,427 73.6 0.9 (71.9–75.3)
South Carolina 12,687 59.6 0.7 (58.3–60.9)
South Dakota 7,836 70.9 0.8 (69.3–72.5)
Tennessee 6,921 61.4 0.8 (59.8–63.1)
Texas 9,040 58.8 0.7 (57.3–60.2)
Utah 12,272 68.4 0.6 (67.2–69.5)
Vermont 6,012 70.8 0.8 (69.3–72.3)
Virginia 7,320 70.4 0.7 (69.0–71.8)
Washington 15,235 67.6 0.5 (66.5–68.6)
West Virginia 5,359 56.4 0.8 (54.8–58.0)
Wisconsin 5,264 72.0 0.9 (70.1–73.8)
Wyoming 6,201 66.0 1.0 (64.0–68.0)
Guam 1,999 53.7 1.5 (50.8–56.6)
Puerto Rico 6,258 67.9 0.7 (66.6–69.3)
Median 67.2
Range 53.7–76.2

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 17. Estimated prevalence of adults aged =18 years who have visited a dentist, dental hygienist, or dental clinic within the past year, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
MMSA(s) Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico 544 69.5 2.2 (65.1–73.9)
Akron, Ohio 740 68.3 2.4 (63.6–73.0)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 3,249 63.7 1.1 (61.6–65.8)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 1,337 72.3 1.8 (68.7–75.9)
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California* 1,037 73.0 2.0 (69.1–77.0)
Anchorage, Alaska 1,495 69.6 1.5 (66.6–72.5)
Asheville, North Carolina 584 67.4 2.5 (62.5–72.2)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 2,512 68.3 1.3 (65.8–70.8)
Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey 1,014 70.6 2.1 (66.4–74.7)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 1,025 62.2 2.8 (56.7–67.8)
Augusta-Waterville, Maine 828 66.8 2.0 (62.9–70.8)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 1,383 65.5 2.1 (61.3–69.6)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 4,680 72.2 1.1 (70.1–74.2)
Bangor, Maine 924 63.2 2.0 (59.3–67.2)
Barnstable Town, Massachusetts 558 81.7 2.1 (77.5–85.8)
Barre, Vermont 514 73.9 2.5 (69.0–78.9)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1,364 59.9 2.1 (55.8–64.0)
Bellingham, Washington 844 67.5 2.6 (62.3–72.6)
Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont 703 57.7 2.9 (52.1–63.4)
Billings, Montana 845 62.2 1.9 (58.4–66.0)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 1,799 59.8 1.6 (56.7–62.9)
Bismarck, North Dakota 818 71.7 2.1 (67.5–76.0)
Boise City, Idaho 1,474 69.9 1.9 (66.3–73.5)
Boston, Massachusetts* 5,857 76.2 0.9 (74.5–77.8)
Boulder, Colorado 514 71.4 2.6 (66.3–76.5)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 564 67.0 2.8 (61.6–72.5)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 2,165 73.1 1.5 (70.2–76.1)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 1,517 74.8 1.4 (72.0–77.6)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts* 6,875 79.1 0.8 (77.6–80.6)
Camden, New Jersey* 1,968 72.3 1.4 (69.5–75.1)
Canton-Massillon, Ohio 677 65.1 2.6 (60.1–70.2)
Casper, Wyoming 816 67.2 2.7 (61.9–72.5)
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 581 72.4 2.5 (67.5–77.3)
Charleston, West Virginia 769 62.3 2.1 (58.3–66.3)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 1,696 59.1 1.7 (55.7–62.5)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 2,494 66.1 1.2 (63.7–68.5)
Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia 620 59.2 3.2 (53.0–65.4)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 954 71.5 2.4 (66.9–76.1)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 3,714 67.8 1.2 (65.4–70.1)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 2,344 68.7 1.3 (66.2–71.2)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 1,939 69.9 1.5 (66.9–72.9)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 1,767 70.1 1.5 (67.1–73.2)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 1,157 69.5 1.7 (66.1–72.9)
Columbia, South Carolina 1,787 63.5 1.7 (60.2–66.8)
Columbus, Ohio 1,593 71.1 1.5 (68.2–73.9)
Concord, New Hampshire 700 73.2 2.3 (68.6–77.7)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas 899 60.5 2.1 (56.4–64.5)
Dayton, Ohio 848 66.4 2.2 (62.1–70.8)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 4,821 66.3 0.9 (64.6–68.0)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 1,151 74.1 1.6 (70.8–77.3)
Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Michigan 2,194 62.4 1.7 (59.1–65.7)
Dover, Delaware 1,436 65.7 1.9 (62.0–69.3)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 512 73.9 2.7 (68.7–79.1)
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina 785 69.3 2.1 (65.1–73.5)
El Paso, Texas 618 48.8 3.2 (42.4–55.1)
Eugene, Oregon 521 63.9 2.9 (58.3–69.5)
Fairbanks, Alaska 595 62.4 2.6 (57.3–67.6)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 934 74.3 2.1 (70.3–78.4)
Farmington, New Mexico 649 57.6 2.5 (52.7–62.4)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 500 69.4 2.6 (64.4–74.5)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 802 56.1 2.7 (50.7–61.5)
Fort Collins, Colorado 595 72.9 2.3 (68.4–77.3)
Fort Wayne, Indiana 531 67.7 2.7 (62.5–72.9)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas* 723 59.9 2.4 (55.2–64.6)
Grand Island, Nebraska 849 63.4 2.4 (58.7–68.0)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 882 72.4 2.2 (68.1–76.6)
Great Falls, Montana 704 61.4 2.4 (56.7–66.1)
Greeley, Colorado 534 60.6 2.7 (55.3–65.8)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 794 60.8 2.2 (56.6–65.1)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 1,683 59.6 1.6 (56.4–62.7)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 735 58.7 2.4 (54.1–63.4)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 752 72.1 2.4 (67.3–76.9)
Harrisburg-Carlisle, Pennsylvania 660 74.8 2.0 (70.8–78.8)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 2,644 80.7 1.1 (78.6–82.7)
Heber, Utah 504 71.0 4.8 (61.5–80.5)
Hilo, Hawaii 1,343 66.7 1.8 (63.2–70.3)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 934 68.4 3.1 (62.3–74.5)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 1,128 60.3 1.8 (56.8–63.9)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 1,101 57.6 2.0 (53.7–61.5)
Huntsville, Alabama 610 66.4 2.6 (61.4–71.5)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 538 68.8 3.4 (62.2–75.5)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 2,185 68.3 1.3 (65.8–70.8)
Jackson, Mississippi 912 60.5 2.0 (56.6–64.5)
Jacksonville, Florida 516 62.8 3.2 (56.5–69.0)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 1,215 70.2 2.0 (66.3–74.1)
Kalispell, Montana 555 60.7 2.4 (55.9–65.5)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 4,712 68.7 1.3 (66.2–71.2)
Kapaa, Hawaii 668 64.6 2.9 (58.9–70.3)
Keene, New Hampshire 537 74.1 2.9 (68.4–79.7)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 533 66.4 2.7 (61.1–71.8)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 556 56.9 3.3 (50.4–63.4)
Knoxville, Tennessee 825 61.7 2.3 (57.2–66.2)
Laconia, New Hampshire 560 62.0 3.6 (54.8–69.1)
Lafayette, Louisiana 544 59.5 2.8 (53.9–65.0)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 701 61.8 2.4 (57.1–66.5)
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nevada 1,991 60.2 1.4 (57.6–62.9)
Lewiston-Auburn, Maine 697 61.1 2.2 (56.8–65.5)
Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 525 67.5 2.6 (62.4–72.6)
Lincoln, Nebraska 1,660 73.1 1.3 (70.5–75.6)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 1,163 61.0 1.9 (57.2–64.8)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 499 72.2 2.7 (66.9–77.5)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California* 3,497 63.8 1.2 (61.5–66.1)
Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 2,155 64.3 1.6 (61.2–67.5)
Lumberton, North Carolina 541 48.4 4.3 (39.9–56.9)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 1,891 74.6 1.4 (71.9–77.3)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas 610 44.8 3.2 (38.6–51.0)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 1,288 62.8 2.0 (58.9–66.6)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 1,662 64.0 1.8 (60.4–67.6)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 1,245 73.6 1.9 (69.9–77.3)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 7,860 75.7 0.8 (74.2–77.2)
Missoula, Montana 778 61.2 2.2 (56.8–65.6)
Mobile, Alabama 805 53.4 2.8 (47.9–58.8)
Montgomery, Alabama 531 61.2 3.0 (55.4–67.1)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania* 1,309 76.1 1.5 (73.1–79.1)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 941 61.7 2.1 (57.5–65.8)
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 1,325 67.9 1.6 (64.8–71.1)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York* 897 69.2 2.1 (65.1–73.3)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania* 6,515 72.4 0.9 (70.6–74.2)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 1,993 72.6 1.4 (69.8–75.5)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 1,263 58.9 1.9 (55.1–62.7)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey* 7,381 66.6 1.1 (64.5–68.7)
Norfolk, Nebraska 565 60.7 3.0 (54.9–66.4)
North Platte, Nebraska 612 60.3 3.0 (54.4–66.3)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 995 77.2 2.1 (73.1–81.3)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California* 976 69.9 2.4 (65.2–74.6)
Ocean City, New Jersey 546 74.5 3.2 (68.1–80.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 2,408 71.4 1.2 (69.1–73.8)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 2,434 63.1 1.3 (60.6–65.5)
Olympia-Tumwater, Washington 515 71.4 2.7 (66.2–76.6)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 5,560 69.1 0.8 (67.4–70.7)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 567 57.5 3.1 (51.3–63.6)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania* 2,435 63.5 1.4 (60.9–66.2)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 2,589 62.7 1.3 (60.2–65.3)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 3,349 66.4 1.0 (64.3–68.4)
Ponce, Puerto Rico 547 65.6 2.4 (61.0–70.3)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 3,326 70.3 1.0 (68.4–72.3)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 3,103 69.4 1.2 (67.2–71.7)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 8,051 73.4 0.8 (71.9–74.9)
Provo-Orem, Utah 1,728 68.9 1.5 (66.1–71.8)
Raleigh, North Carolina 932 71.7 1.8 (68.2–75.1)
Rapid City, South Dakota 1,049 69.0 1.9 (65.1–72.8)
Reno, Nevada 1,498 65.2 1.9 (61.5–68.8)
Richmond, Virginia 1,008 73.9 1.9 (70.2–77.6)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 1,529 63.0 1.7 (59.6–66.4)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire* 1,654 75.5 1.5 (72.6–78.4)
Rutland, Vermont 591 64.9 2.7 (59.6–70.3)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 998 72.2 2.1 (68.2–76.3)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 2,052 69.1 1.5 (66.1–72.0)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 2,110 65.1 1.9 (61.3–68.9)
Salt Lake City, Utah 4,565 67.3 1.0 (65.5–69.2)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 775 62.1 2.4 (57.4–66.8)
San Diego-Carlsbad, California 1,127 71.5 1.9 (67.7–75.3)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California* 596 72.7 2.7 (67.4–78.0)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 684 76.4 2.2 (72.1–80.7)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 3,918 69.0 0.9 (67.3–70.7)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 691 66.1 2.3 (61.7–70.5)
Sayre, Pennsylvania 1,848 66.3 2.1 (62.1–70.5)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 625 59.6 3.2 (53.3–65.9)
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pennsylvania 739 66.9 2.4 (62.2–71.6)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington* 5,079 71.8 0.9 (70.1–73.5)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 567 54.3 2.8 (48.7–59.8)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland* 2,289 77.9 1.5 (75.1–80.8)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 1,200 68.0 2.9 (62.3–73.7)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 1,458 74.0 1.6 (70.9–77.0)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 702 60.0 2.7 (54.7–65.3)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 1,095 64.7 2.0 (60.7–68.6)
Springfield, Massachusetts 2,326 72.7 1.5 (69.7–75.6)
Tacoma-Lakewood, Washington* 1,172 67.0 1.8 (63.4–70.5)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 825 57.6 2.5 (52.8–62.4)
Toledo, Ohio 966 67.8 2.6 (62.8–72.9)
Topeka, Kansas 1,081 66.2 2.0 (62.4–70.1)
Torrington, Connecticut 660 78.1 2.2 (73.9–82.4)
Trenton, New Jersey 571 72.8 2.7 (67.5–78.1)
Tucson, Arizona 990 61.9 2.2 (57.6–66.2)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 1,738 61.0 1.5 (58.1–63.9)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 574 59.4 3.4 (52.6–66.1)
Urban Honolulu, Hawaii 4,332 71.5 1.0 (69.5–73.5)
Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey 551 67.5 3.3 (61.0–74.0)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 1,486 71.8 1.6 (68.6–75.0)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan* 2,177 73.4 1.3 (70.9–75.9)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia* 8,145 72.5 0.9 (70.8–74.3)
Wichita, Kansas 2,338 69.5 1.3 (66.9–72.0)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey* 3,213 71.9 1.2 (69.5–74.4)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 779 67.9 2.1 (63.8–72.0)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 2,825 73.7 1.3 (71.2–76.2)
Yakima, Washington 528 54.1 3.0 (48.1–60.1)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 924 65.9 2.7 (60.5–71.3)
Median   67.5    
Range   44.8–81.7    

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error
* Metropolitan division.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 18. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥18 years who have visited a dentist, dental hygienist or dental clinic within the past year, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
County Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Jefferson County, Alabama 947 59.6 2.0 (55.7–63.5)
Madison County, Alabama 509 69.1 2.7 (63.7–74.5)
Mobile County, Alabama 805 53.4 2.8 (47.9–58.8)
Anchorage Municipality, Alaska 898 71.5 1.8 (68.0–75.0)
Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska 595 62.4 2.6 (57.3–67.6)
Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska 597 62.5 2.6 (57.4–67.6)
Maricopa County, Arizona 2,109 63.3 1.4 (60.5–66.0)
Pima County, Arizona 990 61.9 2.2 (57.6–66.2)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 741 61.8 2.6 (56.6–66.9)
Alameda County, California 619 67.1 3.1 (61.1–73.2)
Los Angeles County, California 3,497 63.8 1.2 (61.5–66.1)
Orange County, California 1,037 73.0 2.0 (69.1–77.0)
Riverside County, California 824 63.8 2.4 (59.2–68.4)
Sacramento County, California 609 72.6 2.6 (67.4–77.7)
San Bernardino County, California 705 62.5 2.5 (57.6–67.4)
San Diego County, California 1,127 71.5 1.9 (67.7–75.3)
Santa Clara County, California 665 76.3 2.3 (71.9–80.8)
Adams County, Colorado 800 56.9 2.3 (52.4–61.4)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 854 68.9 1.9 (65.1–72.7)
Boulder County, Colorado 514 71.4 2.6 (66.3–76.5)
Denver County, Colorado 988 62.2 1.9 (58.5–65.8)
Douglas County, Colorado 543 79.0 2.2 (74.8–83.3)
El Paso County, Colorado 1,017 70.0 1.8 (66.5–73.5)
Jefferson County, Colorado 1,115 70.5 1.7 (67.2–73.9)
Larimer County, Colorado 595 72.9 2.3 (68.4–77.3)
Weld County, Colorado 534 60.6 2.7 (55.3–65.8)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 2,165 73.1 1.5 (70.2–76.1)
Hartford County, Connecticut 1,965 80.8 1.3 (78.3–83.3)
Litchfield County, Connecticut 660 78.1 2.2 (73.9–82.4)
New Haven County, Connecticut 1,993 72.6 1.4 (69.8–75.5)
New London County, Connecticut 995 77.2 2.1 (73.1–81.3)
Kent County, Delaware 1,436 65.7 1.9 (62.0–69.3)
New Castle County, Delaware 2,323 73.7 1.2 (71.3–76.1)
Sussex County, Delaware 1,393 63.9 1.9 (60.3–67.6)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 3,801 71.1 1.2 (68.6–73.5)
Broward County, Florida 528 64.2 3.3 (57.8–70.5)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 809 61.1 2.8 (55.6–66.7)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 1,343 66.7 1.8 (63.2–70.3)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 4,332 71.5 1.0 (69.5–73.5)
Kauai County, Hawaii 668 64.6 2.9 (58.9–70.3)
Maui County, Hawaii 1,215 70.2 2.0 (66.3–74.1)
Ada County, Idaho 805 73.3 2.3 (68.8–77.8)
Canyon County, Idaho 501 62.1 3.6 (55.0–69.1)
Cook County, Illinois 1,500 65.8 1.7 (62.4–69.2)
Lake County, Indiana 878 54.6 2.8 (49.0–60.1)
Marion County, Indiana 1,269 64.1 1.8 (60.5–67.7)
Polk County, Iowa 802 74.4 2.0 (70.6–78.2)
Johnson County, Kansas 2,166 76.6 1.3 (74.0–79.2)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 1,783 69.5 1.5 (66.6–72.4)
Shawnee County, Kansas 767 67.7 2.3 (63.1–72.3)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 865 53.9 3.1 (47.8–59.9)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 1,670 64.9 2.0 (61.0–68.8)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 565 63.6 2.7 (58.2–69.0)
Androscoggin County, Maine 697 61.1 2.2 (56.8–65.5)
Aroostook County, Maine 534 51.3 2.6 (46.1–56.4)
Cumberland County, Maine 1,753 72.4 1.3 (69.8–75.1)
Kennebec County, Maine 828 66.8 2.0 (62.9–70.8)
Penobscot County, Maine 924 63.2 2.0 (59.3–67.2)
York County, Maine 1,192 68.6 1.6 (65.4–71.8)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 890 70.1 2.4 (65.4–74.8)
Baltimore County, Maryland 1,505 73.2 1.7 (69.8–76.6)
Charles County, Maryland 509 68.2 3.8 (60.9–75.6)
Frederick County, Maryland 752 79.1 2.5 (74.2–84.1)
Montgomery County, Maryland 1,537 77.7 1.7 (74.4–81.0)
Prince George´s County, Maryland 1,127 67.8 2.3 (63.3–72.4)
Washington County, Maryland 532 78.9 2.7 (73.6–84.2)
Baltimore city, Maryland 735 69.8 2.6 (64.7–75.0)
Barnstable County, Massachusetts 558 81.7 2.1 (77.5–85.8)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 2,624 73.2 1.5 (70.1–76.2)
Essex County, Massachusetts 2,545 79.5 1.3 (77.0–82.0)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 1,944 70.5 1.8 (67.0–73.9)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 4,330 79.0 0.9 (77.2–80.8)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 1,751 81.7 1.3 (79.1–84.3)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 1,823 74.6 1.7 (71.3–77.9)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 2,283 72.9 1.4 (70.1–75.6)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 2,583 73.8 1.4 (71.1–76.4)
Kent County, Michigan 518 74.8 2.8 (69.4–80.2)
Macomb County, Michigan 609 72.7 2.2 (68.4–77.1)
Oakland County, Michigan 1,166 74.5 1.8 (70.9–78.1)
Wayne County, Michigan 2,194 62.4 1.7 (59.1–65.6)
Anoka County, Minnesota 541 77.3 2.3 (72.8–81.9)
Dakota County, Minnesota 672 78.2 2.0 (74.2–82.2)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 3,284 75.7 1.2 (73.4–77.9)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 1,939 71.3 2.2 (67.1–75.6)
Jackson County, Missouri 880 69.1 2.6 (64.0–74.2)
St. Louis County, Missouri 944 71.4 2.1 (67.3–75.4)
Cascade County, Montana 704 61.4 2.4 (56.7–66.1)
Flathead County, Montana 555 60.7 2.4 (55.9–65.5)
Hill County, Montana 578 61.6 3.5 (54.8–68.4)
Lake County, Montana 890 57.2 2.7 (51.8–62.6)
Missoula County, Montana 778 61.2 2.2 (56.8–65.6)
Yellowstone County, Montana 749 62.5 2.0 (58.5–66.4)
Dakota County, Nebraska 731 57.9 4.7 (48.7–67.1)
Douglas County, Nebraska 3,552 68.4 1.0 (66.4–70.4)
Hall County, Nebraska 531 64.6 3.0 (58.8–70.5)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 1,438 72.8 1.4 (70.1–75.5)
Lincoln County, Nebraska 588 60.3 3.1 (54.3–66.4)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 1,171 73.7 1.7 (70.3–77.0)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 573 58.2 3.3 (51.7–64.7)
Clark County, Nevada 1,991 60.2 1.4 (57.6–62.9)
Washoe County, Nevada 1,479 65.0 1.9 (61.3–68.7)
Belknap County, New Hampshire 560 62.0 3.6 (54.8–69.1)
Carroll County, New Hampshire 526 73.5 3.0 (67.7–79.3)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 537 74.1 2.9 (68.4–79.7)
Coos County, New Hampshire 532 56.6 3.3 (50.1–63.2)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 561 70.7 2.9 (65.0–76.4)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 1,891 74.6 1.4 (71.9–77.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 700 73.2 2.3 (68.6–77.7)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 1,039 77.6 1.7 (74.2–81.1)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 615 70.2 2.9 (64.6–75.8)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 1,014 70.6 2.1 (66.4–74.7)
Bergen County, New Jersey 997 71.9 1.9 (68.1–75.7)
Burlington County, New Jersey 681 74.5 2.5 (69.7–79.3)
Camden County, New Jersey 738 68.6 2.4 (63.9–73.3)
Cape May County, New Jersey 546 74.5 3.2 (68.1–80.8)
Cumberland County, New Jersey 551 67.5 3.3 (61.0–74.0)
Essex County, New Jersey 1,327 66.0 1.8 (62.6–69.5)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 549 74.7 2.6 (69.7–79.7)
Hudson County, New Jersey 1,296 63.7 1.8 (60.1–67.3)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 569 79.8 2.4 (75.0–84.6)
Mercer County, New Jersey 571 72.8 2.7 (67.5–78.1)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 876 69.2 2.3 (64.8–73.6)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 708 76.6 2.2 (72.3–80.8)
Morris County, New Jersey 846 80.1 1.9 (76.4–83.9)
Ocean County, New Jersey 656 74.3 2.3 (69.8–78.9)
Passaic County, New Jersey 681 64.8 2.5 (59.9–69.7)
Salem County, New Jersey 579 64.9 4.0 (57.0–72.7)
Somerset County, New Jersey 638 79.2 2.4 (74.5–83.9)
Sussex County, New Jersey 544 67.4 2.8 (61.9–73.0)
Union County, New Jersey 708 69.5 2.3 (65.1–74.0)
Warren County, New Jersey 523 72.8 2.8 (67.3–78.4)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 2,048 65.0 1.3 (62.5–67.5)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 701 61.8 2.4 (57.1–66.5)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 656 63.7 2.4 (58.9–68.5)
San Juan County, New Mexico 649 57.6 2.5 (52.7–62.4)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 691 66.1 2.3 (61.7–70.5)
Kings County, New York 499 64.1 3.0 (58.3–70.0)
Guilford County, North Carolina 505 63.3 2.7 (58.1–68.6)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 721 69.0 2.1 (65.0–73.0)
Robeson County, North Carolina 541 48.4 4.3 (39.9–56.9)
Wake County, North Carolina 693 75.1 2.0 (71.2–79.0)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 568 75.0 2.6 (70.0–80.0)
Cass County, North Dakota 838 72.7 2.2 (68.4–77.0)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 858 68.4 2.1 (64.3–72.4)
Franklin County, Ohio 833 71.5 1.9 (67.7–75.3)
Hamilton County, Ohio 768 73.0 1.9 (69.2–76.8)
Lorain County, Ohio 609 75.6 3.0 (69.7–81.6)
Lucas County, Ohio 619 65.5 3.2 (59.2–71.8)
Mahoning County, Ohio 588 68.7 3.3 (62.3–75.1)
Montgomery County, Ohio 657 65.5 2.6 (60.5–70.6)
Stark County, Ohio 620 65.4 2.7 (60.2–70.7)
Summit County, Ohio 627 67.1 2.7 (61.8–72.4)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 1,189 61.9 1.7 (58.5–65.2)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 1,200 61.2 1.8 (57.7–64.6)
Clackamas County, Oregon 506 69.9 3.0 (64.1–75.8)
Lane County, Oregon 521 63.9 2.9 (58.3–69.5)
Multnomah County, Oregon 885 70.4 2.1 (66.3–74.4)
Washington County, Oregon 610 71.4 2.5 (66.6–76.3)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 1,881 68.9 1.4 (66.2–71.6)
Bradford County, Pennsylvania 1,848 66.3 2.1 (62.1–70.5)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 546 76.3 2.2 (71.9–80.6)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 2,043 61.7 1.5 (58.7–64.7)
Pike County, Pennsylvania 1,883 73.4 1.6 (70.2–76.6)
Kent County, Rhode Island 803 74.5 2.4 (69.9–79.1)
Providence County, Rhode Island 3,313 70.5 1.1 (68.2–72.7)
Washington County, Rhode Island 653 78.3 2.5 (73.5–83.1)
Aiken County, South Carolina 553 60.8 3.0 (55.0–66.6)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 802 71.5 3.1 (65.4–77.6)
Charleston County, South Carolina 1,009 58.5 2.3 (53.9–63.1)
Greenville County, South Carolina 900 60.4 2.2 (56.1–64.7)
Horry County, South Carolina 772 60.5 2.3 (56.0–65.0)
Richland County, South Carolina 956 63.1 2.3 (58.5–67.7)
Spartanburg County, South Carolina 648 61.8 2.8 (56.4–67.3)
Lincoln County, South Dakota 496 79.2 2.5 (74.3–84.0)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 876 73.1 1.8 (69.5–76.6)
Pennington County, South Dakota 604 68.5 2.3 (64.0–73.0)
Davidson County, Tennessee 553 65.3 2.6 (60.1–70.4)
Shelby County, Tennessee 524 65.7 2.6 (60.7–70.7)
Bexar County, Texas 583 60.7 2.8 (55.3–66.2)
Dallas County, Texas 506 52.1 2.8 (46.7–57.6)
El Paso County, Texas 617 48.9 3.2 (42.5–55.2)
Harris County, Texas 762 59.6 2.1 (55.4–63.8)
Hidalgo County, Texas 610 44.8 3.2 (38.6–51.0)
Tarrant County, Texas 569 59.0 2.7 (53.6–64.4)
Travis County, Texas 1,046 65.1 2.5 (60.3–70.0)
Davis County, Utah 1,143 73.0 1.7 (69.7–76.2)
Salt Lake County, Utah 4,009 67.3 1.0 (65.3–69.2)
Tooele County, Utah 556 69.1 3.3 (62.7–75.5)
Utah County, Utah 1,661 68.9 1.5 (66.1–71.8)
Wasatch County, Utah 504 71.0 4.8 (61.5–80.5)
Weber County, Utah 1,032 69.1 2.0 (65.3–73.0)
Chittenden County, Vermont 918 76.7 1.7 (73.4–80.1)
Rutland County, Vermont 591 64.9 2.7 (59.6–70.3)
Washington County, Vermont 514 73.9 2.5 (69.0–78.9)
Windsor County, Vermont 544 72.8 2.4 (68.1–77.4)
Fairfax County, Virginia 737 77.5 2.0 (73.6–81.4)
Clark County, Washington 789 67.1 2.2 (62.7–71.5)
King County, Washington 3,908 72.6 1.0 (70.6–74.6)
Kitsap County, Washington 564 67.0 2.8 (61.6–72.5)
Pierce County, Washington 1,172 67.0 1.8 (63.4–70.5)
Snohomish County, Washington 1,171 69.2 1.8 (65.6–72.7)
Spokane County, Washington 950 66.3 2.2 (62.1–70.6)
Thurston County, Washington 515 71.4 2.7 (66.2–76.6)
Whatcom County, Washington 844 67.5 2.6 (62.3–72.6)
Yakima County, Washington 528 54.1 3.0 (48.1–60.1)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 638 65.6 2.2 (61.4–69.9)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 951 66.8 2.4 (62.1–71.6)
Laramie County, Wyoming 954 71.5 2.4 (66.9–76.1)
Natrona County, Wyoming 816 67.2 2.7 (61.9–72.5)
San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico 665 70.5 2.1 (66.4–74.7)
Median 68.9
Range 44.8–81.7

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 19. Estimated prevalence of adults ≥65 years who have lost all of their natural teeth, by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 3,035 23.6 1.0 (21.5–25.6)
Alaska 736 15.6 1.9 (11.9–19.3)
Arizona 2,760 13.3 1.0 (11.3–15.2)
Arkansas 1,819 23.7 1.3 (21.2–26.2)
California 4,243 8.7 0.7 (7.4–10.0)
Colorado 3,398 12.4 0.7 (10.9–13.8)
Connecticut 2,581 13.6 1.0 (11.6–15.6)
Delaware 1,645 16.9 1.3 (14.4–19.4)
District of Columbia 1,164 13.1 1.5 (10.3–16.0)
Florida 2,955 15.8 1.1 (13.7–17.9)
Georgia 1,828 18.4 1.2 (16.1–20.6)
Hawaii 1,938 7.0 0.9 (5.3–8.7)
Idaho 2,134 16.1 1.3 (13.5–18.6)
Illinois 1,944 16.1 1.1 (13.9–18.2)
Indiana 2,641 19.7 1.0 (17.7–21.7)
Iowa 2,421 17.3 0.9 (15.6–19.0)
Kansas 3,852 18.8 0.8 (17.4–20.3)
Kentucky 3,202 24.8 1.2 (22.5–27.0)
Louisiana 3,105 28.7 1.3 (26.2–31.3)
Maine 3,075 22.1 0.9 (20.3–23.9)
Maryland 3,962 14.5 0.9 (12.8–16.3)
Massachusetts 6,058 15.5 0.7 (14.0–16.9)
Michigan 3,372 13.3 0.8 (11.8–14.9)
Minnesota 3,266 12.0 0.8 (10.4–13.5)
Mississippi 2,770 25.0 1.0 (23.0–27.0)
Missouri 2,314 24.9 1.4 (22.1–27.6)
Montana 2,708 18.1 1.0 (16.2–19.9)
Nebraska 6,502 13.4 0.6 (12.2–14.5)
Nevada 1,503 15.1 1.4 (12.4–17.8)
New Hampshire 2,468 13.1 0.9 (11.3–14.8)
New Jersey 4,159 14.0 0.8 (12.4–15.5)
New Mexico 2,521 16.2 0.9 (14.4–17.9)
New York 1,651 15.1 1.4 (12.3–17.8)
North Carolina 3,495 21.0 0.9 (19.2–22.8)
North Dakota 1,528 17.1 1.2 (14.8–19.4)
Ohio 3,859 20.3 1.0 (18.3–22.2)
Oklahoma 2,581 21.0 1.0 (19.2–22.9)
Oregon 1,707 15.0 1.1 (12.9–17.1)
Pennsylvania 6,341 18.2 0.7 (16.8–19.6)
Rhode Island 1,583 12.5 1.0 (10.4–14.5)
South Carolina 4,178 19.5 1.0 (17.6–21.4)
South Dakota 2,287 19.4 1.7 (16.1–22.8)
Tennessee 2,276 24.8 1.3 (22.3–27.3)
Texas 2,604 13.4 1.0 (11.4–15.4)
Utah 3,181 12.9 0.8 (11.4–14.5)
Vermont 1,895 17.5 1.1 (15.4–19.6)
Virginia 2,137 16.1 1.0 (14.1–18.0)
Washington 4,746 10.9 0.6 (9.7–12.2)
West Virginia 1,667 33.7 1.3 (31.1–36.4)
Wisconsin 1,579 13.5 1.5 (10.6–16.4)
Wyoming 2,277 17.7 1.2 (15.4–19.9)
Guam 209 19.1 4.1 (11.2–27.1)
Puerto Rico 1,840 19.8 1.1 (17.7–22.0)
Median 16.2
Range 7.0–33.7

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error. 

Return to your place in the textTABLE 20. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have lost all of their natural teeth, by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
MMSA(s) Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Aguadilla-Isabela, Puerto Rico 158 26.4 3.9 (18.7–34.2)
Akron, Ohio 223 14.8 3.0 (8.9–20.6)
Albuquerque, New Mexico 880 14.8 1.5 (11.9–17.7)
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pennsylvania-New Jersey 422 14.9 2.1 (10.7–19.1)
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, California* 323 6.4 1.9 (2.7–10.0)
Anchorage, Alaska 230 12.7 2.9 (7.1–18.3)
Asheville, North Carolina 213 18.6 3.4 (11.9–25.2)
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, Georgia 660 14.7 1.8 (11.2–18.1)
Atlantic City-Hammonton, New Jersey 338 17.9 2.8 (12.4–23.4)
Augusta-Richmond County, Georgia-South Carolina 342 21.3 4.1 (13.3–29.4)
Augusta-Waterville, Maine 215 28.7 3.8 (21.3–36.1)
Austin-Round Rock, Texas 391 9.8 2.2 (5.5–14.1)
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, Maryland 1,354 15.9 1.4 (13.1–18.7)
Bangor, Maine 249 28.0 3.4 (21.4–34.7)
Barnstable Town, Massachusetts 260 12.2 3.0 (6.4–18.0)
Barre, Vermont 132 15.8 3.7 (8.5–23.2)
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 483 27.5 3.1 (21.4–33.5)
Bellingham, Washington 268 7.6 2.1 (3.5–11.7)
Berlin, New Hampshire-Vermont 260 25.3 3.1 (19.2–31.3)
Billings, Montana 249 21.7 2.9 (16.0–27.5)
Birmingham-Hoover, Alabama 566 23.4 2.3 (18.9–27.8)
Bismarck, North Dakota 245 17.0 3.4 (10.3–23.7)
Boise City, Idaho 493 13.6 2.3 (9.1–18.1)
Boston, Massachusetts* 1,620 13.0 1.2 (10.7–15.3)
Boulder, Colorado 127 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Bremerton-Silverdale, Washington 193 10.0 2.8 (4.6–15.5)
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut 582 12.9 2.6 (7.9–17.9)
Burlington-South Burlington, Vermont 405 16.4 2.3 (12.0–20.9)
Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, Massachusetts* 1,800 12.7 1.2 (10.4–15.0)
Camden, New Jersey* 533 16.0 2.4 (11.2–20.7)
Canton-Massillon, Ohio 220 26.9 3.8 (19.3–34.4)
Casper, Wyoming 308 18.4 3.3 (12.0–24.7)
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 196 15.4 2.8 (9.9–20.8)
Charleston, West Virginia 232 34.0 3.5 (27.0–40.9)
Charleston-North Charleston, South Carolina 521 15.9 2.2 (11.6–20.3)
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, North Carolina-South Carolina 664 21.9 2.2 (17.6–26.2)
Chattanooga, Tennessee-Georgia 227 31.4 4.1 (23.4–39.4)
Cheyenne, Wyoming 373 14.4 2.1 (10.2–18.6)
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin 1,131 14.5 1.5 (11.7–17.4)
Cincinnati, Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana 613 20.7 2.4 (16.0–25.5)
Claremont-Lebanon, New Hampshire-Vermont 680 14.7 1.6 (11.4–17.9)
Cleveland-Elyria, Ohio 533 19.0 2.9 (13.3–24.7)
Colorado Springs, Colorado 282 13.7 2.4 (9.1–18.4)
Columbia, South Carolina 496 17.4 2.6 (12.2–22.5)
Columbus, Ohio 401 17.6 2.5 (12.7–22.5)
Concord, New Hampshire 221 10.6 2.6 (5.5–15.7)
Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas* 214 14.9 2.8 (9.4–20.3)
Dayton, Ohio 260 19.3 3.1 (13.3–25.4)
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colorado 1,156 11.7 1.2 (9.2–14.1)
Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa 341 12.2 2.1 (8.2–16.3)
Detroit-Dearborn-Livonia, Michigan* 720 11.9 1.7 (8.6–15.1)
Dover, Delaware 469 20.1 2.3 (15.6–24.5)
Duluth, Minnesota-Wisconsin 150 12.0 3.0 (6.2–17.9)
Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina 202 11.1 2.7 (5.9–16.4)
El Paso, Texas 193 9.1 2.2 (4.7–13.5)
Eugene, Oregon 171 14.8 3.3 (8.2–21.3)
Fairbanks, Alaska 96 22.9 5.7 (11.7–34.2)
Fargo, North Dakota-Minnesota 255 7.0 1.7 (3.7–10.3)
Farmington, New Mexico 174 24.5 4.0 (16.7–32.3)
Fayetteville, North Carolina 112 15.9 4.0 (8.0–23.7)
Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Arkansas-Missouri 283 23.7 3.4 (17.2–30.3)
Fort Collins, Colorado 171 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Fort Wayne, Indiana 146 18.3 4.0 (10.6–26.1)
Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas* 213 14.1 3.6 (7.1–21.2)
Grand Island, Nebraska 296 12.7 2.4 (8.1–17.4)
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan 259 12.8 2.6 (7.6–17.9)
Great Falls, Montana 249 18.0 2.7 (12.7–23.2)
Greeley, Colorado 124 15.4 4.1 (7.5–23.4)
Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina 240 15.8 2.6 (10.6–20.9)
Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, South Carolina 521 20.9 2.6 (15.8–26.0)
Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi 255 21.8 3.0 (16.0–27.7)
Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Maryland-West Virginia 253 20.4 3.3 (13.9–26.9)
Harrisburg-Carlisle, Pennsylvania 185 8.0 2.0 (4.1–11.9)
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Connecticut 777 13.1 1.7 (9.8–16.4)
Heber, Utah 152 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Hilo, Hawaii 378 11.0 2.9 (5.3–16.7)
Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort, South Carolina 474 7.7 1.5 (4.7–10.7)
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas 219 13.7 3.1 (7.7–19.7)
Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky-Ohio 334 28.0 3.0 (22.2–33.8)
Huntsville, Alabama 152 14.4 3.5 (7.5–21.2)
Idaho Falls, Idaho 176 25.2 6.4 (12.6–37.8)
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana 623 18.9 2.3 (14.4–23.5)
Jackson, Mississippi 277 22.1 2.9 (16.4–27.9)
Jacksonville, Florida 168 18.9 3.8 (11.4–26.4)
Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina, Hawaii 363 9.7 2.1 (5.6–13.8)
Kalispell, Montana 172 14.5 3.4 (7.8–21.2)
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1,495 19.1 2.1 (14.9–23.2)
Kapaa, Hawaii 227 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Keene, New Hampshire 203 19.5 4.1 (11.4–27.6)
Kennewick-Richland, Washington 151 16.0 3.7 (8.6–23.3)
Kingsport-Bristol-Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia 193 29.9 4.7 (20.7–39.2)
Knoxville, Tennessee 261 25.3 3.7 (18.1–32.4)
Laconia, New Hampshire 225 15.6 3.1 (9.5–21.6)
Lafayette, Louisiana 165 39.6 5.2 (29.3–49.9)
Las Cruces, New Mexico 209 8.9 2.6 (3.9–14.0)
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nevada 493 14.2 1.9 (10.5–18.0)
Lewiston-Auburn, Maine 183 24.1 3.7 (16.8–31.5)
Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 116 18.9 4.3 (10.5–27.4)
Lincoln, Nebraska 363 9.6 1.9 (5.9–13.3)
Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, Arkansas 354 18.3 2.6 (13.2–23.5)
Logan, Utah-Idaho 120 12.2 3.4 (5.5–18.9)
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California* 861 8.4 1.5 (5.5–11.4)
Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky-Indiana 651 22.2 2.7 (17.0–27.4)
Lumberton, North Carolina 158 18.9 4.1 (10.9–26.9)
Manchester-Nashua, New Hampshire 506 12.7 1.9 (9.0–16.3)
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas 182 12.1 3.5 (5.3–18.9)
Memphis, Tennessee-Mississippi-Arkansas 405 18.6 2.6 (13.4–23.7)
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Florida 585 14.1 2.2 (9.9–18.4)
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wisconsin 320 8.9 2.0 (4.9–12.9)
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minnesota-Wisconsin 1,980 10.2 1.0 (8.2–12.2)
Missoula, Montana 219 17.2 3.2 (11.0–23.4)
Mobile, Alabama 297 24.2 3.4 (17.5–30.9)
Montgomery, Alabama 170 17.5 3.7 (10.2–24.7)
Montgomery County-Bucks County-Chester County, Pennsylvania* 340 10.7 2.0 (6.8–14.6)
Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina-North Carolina 338 14.0 2.4 (9.2–18.8)
Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tennessee 334 21.7 3.0 (15.8–27.5)
Nassau County-Suffolk County, New York* 262 10.5 2.2 (6.2–14.8)
Newark, New Jersey-Pennsylvania* 1,898 12.9 1.4 (10.1–15.7)
New Haven-Milford, Connecticut 605 13.9 1.9 (10.3–17.6)
New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana 389 20.9 3.0 (15.1–26.7)
New York-Jersey City-White Plains, New York-New Jersey* 1,680 14.3 1.8 (10.8–17.9)
Norfolk, Nebraska 192 21.4 3.7 (14.1–28.7)
North Platte, Nebraska 247 19.4 3.6 (12.3–26.4)
Norwich-New London, Connecticut 347 14.5 3.4 (7.9–21.1)
Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, California* 296 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Ocean City, New Jersey 225 13.7 2.6 (8.6–18.8)
Ogden-Clearfield, Utah 620 11.9 1.5 (8.9–14.8)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 629 16.4 1.7 (13.2–19.7)
Olympia-Tumwater, Washington 156 13.6 3.7 (6.3–21.0)
Omaha-Council Bluffs, Nebraska-Iowa 1,487 12.5 1.2 (10.2–14.8)
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Florida 208 22.1 5.2 (12.0–32.2)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania* 675 16.4 1.8 (12.8–19.9)
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona 825 11.6 1.5 (8.6–14.6)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1,115 22.5 1.7 (19.2–25.7)
Ponce, Puerto Rico 158 24.8 4.3 (16.5–33.1)
Portland-South Portland, Maine 1,042 16.0 1.3 (13.4–18.6)
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Oregon-Washington 881 11.5 1.4 (8.8–14.2)
Providence-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts 2,415 16.2 1.2 (13.9–18.6)
Provo-Orem, Utah 375 10.6 1.8 (7.0–14.2)
Raleigh, North Carolina 180 16.9 3.3 (10.4–23.4)
Rapid City, South Dakota 287 17.9 3.3 (11.4–24.4)
Reno, Nevada 492 14.8 2.3 (10.3–19.4)
Richmond, Virginia 301 17.8 2.7 (12.6–23.0)
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, California 445 12.5 2.1 (8.4–16.6)
Rockingham County-Strafford County, New Hampshire* 514 11.3 1.8 (7.7–14.9)
Rutland, Vermont 188 13.4 2.9 (7.6–19.1)
Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, California 284 7.2 1.8 (3.7–10.7)
St. Louis, Missouri-Illinois 651 21.2 2.5 (16.2–26.1)
Salisbury, Maryland-Delaware 850 17.0 1.6 (14.0–20.1)
Salt Lake City, Utah 1,137 12.3 1.4 (9.6–15.0)
San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas 237 9.4 2.3 (4.9–14.0)
San Diego-Carlsbad, California 333 5.8 1.5 (2.8–8.8)
San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, California* 174 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California 187 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
San Juan-Carolina-Caguas, Puerto Rico 1,137 16.3 1.3 (13.6–18.9)
Santa Fe, New Mexico 197 15.4 3.3 (9.0–21.9)
Sayre, Pennsylvania 663 26.6 2.2 (22.4–30.9)
Scottsbluff, Nebraska 269 14.1 2.5 (9.1–19.1)
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pennsylvania 259 21.8 3.4 (15.2–28.5)
Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington* 1,362 8.0 1.1 (5.8–10.1)
Shreveport-Bossier City, Louisiana 182 22.7 3.8 (15.3–30.1)
Silver Spring-Frederick-Rockville, Maryland* 664 9.4 1.5 (6.5–12.4)
Sioux City, Iowa-Nebraska-South Dakota 450 21.7 4.2 (13.5–29.9)
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 287 19.2 4.0 (11.3–27.0)
Spartanburg, South Carolina 223 29.5 4.7 (20.4–38.6)
Spokane-Spokane Valley, Washington 367 13.8 2.5 (8.9–18.7)
Springfield, Massachusetts 630 21.5 2.9 (15.9–27.2)
Tacoma-Lakewood, Washington* 298 15.3 2.8 (9.9–20.8)
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida 305 15.1 2.5 (10.1–20.0)
Toledo, Ohio 292 12.6 2.9 (6.9–18.3)
Topeka, Kansas 332 18.7 2.5 (13.8–23.6)
Torrington, Connecticut 202 8.1 2.3 (3.7–12.6)
Trenton, New Jersey 147 10.8 3.2 (4.6–17.1)
Tucson, Arizona 371 12.7 2.1 (8.6–16.9)
Tulsa, Oklahoma 542 17.1 1.9 (13.4–20.7)
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 196 22.8 4.1 (14.8–30.8)
Urban Honolulu, Hawaii 970 6.0 1.1 (3.9–8.1)
Vineland-Bridgeton, New Jersey 159 20.0 3.9 (12.4–27.6)
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, Virginia-North Carolina 442 12.3 1.9 (8.6–16.0)
Warren-Troy-Farmington Hills, Michigan* 654 11.4 1.8 (7.9–15.0)
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia* 2,200 9.6 1.0 (7.7–11.5)
Wichita, Kansas 739 17.0 1.6 (13.9–20.1)
Wilmington, Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey* 876 17.8 2.4 (13.1–22.5)
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 250 24.4 3.4 (17.8–30.9)
Worcester, Massachusetts-Connecticut 776 19.7 2.2 (15.3–24.1)
Yakima, Washington 155 16.8 3.6 (9.7–23.9)
Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania 333 20.8 3.4 (14.2–27.4)
Median 15.8
Range 5.8–39.6

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; MMSA = metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area; SE = standard error.
* Metropolitan division.
Estimate not available (N/A) if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the relative standard error is >0.3.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 21. Estimated prevalence of adults aged ≥65 years who have lost all of their natural teeth, by county — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
County Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Jefferson County, Alabama 268 24.7 3.3 (18.3–31.2)
Madison County, Alabama 130 14.7 3.7 (7.5–22.0)
Mobile County, Alabama 297 24.2 3.4 (17.5–30.9)
Anchorage Municipality, Alaska 126 13.2 3.6 (6.2–20.3)
Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska 96 22.9 5.7 (11.7–34.2)
Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska 104 N/A* N/A (N/A–N/A)
Maricopa County, Arizona 611 11.8 1.6 (8.6–15.1)
Pima County, Arizona 371 12.7 2.1 (8.6–16.9)
Pulaski County, Arkansas 231 13.9 2.7 (8.6–19.2)
Alameda County, California 179 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Los Angeles County, California 861 8.4 1.5 (5.5–11.4)
Orange County, California 323 6.4 1.9 (2.7–10.0)
Riverside County, California 269 8.9 2.1 (4.9–13.0)
Sacramento County, California 163 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
San Bernardino County, California 176 19.2 4.2 (11.0–27.5)
San Diego County, California 333 5.8 1.5 (2.8–8.8)
Santa Clara County, California 177 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Adams County, Colorado 196 17.1 3.5 (10.3–23.9)
Arapahoe County, Colorado 198 10.2 2.7 (4.8–15.5)
Boulder County, Colorado 127 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Denver County, Colorado 221 11.7 2.7 (6.4–17.0)
Douglas County, Colorado 100 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
El Paso County, Colorado 230 13.8 2.5 (8.9–18.7)
Jefferson County, Colorado 313 9.2 1.9 (5.5–12.9)
Larimer County, Colorado 171 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Weld County, Colorado 124 15.4 4.1 (7.5–23.4)
Fairfield County, Connecticut 582 12.9 2.6 (7.9–17.9)
Hartford County, Connecticut 566 13.1 2.0 (9.1–17.2)
Litchfield County, Connecticut 202 8.1 2.3 (3.7–12.6)
New Haven County, Connecticut 605 13.9 1.9 (10.3–17.6)
New London County, Connecticut 347 14.5 3.4 (7.9–21.1)
Kent County, Delaware 469 20.1 2.3 (15.6–24.5)
New Castle County, Delaware 609 15.4 2.0 (11.4–19.4)
Sussex County, Delaware 567 17.4 1.9 (13.6–21.2)
District of Columbia, District of Columbia 1,164 13.1 1.5 (10.3–16.0)
Broward County, Florida 174 12.8 3.7 (5.6–20.0)
Miami-Dade County, Florida 258 17.7 4.2 (9.5–25.9)
Hawaii County, Hawaii 378 11.0 2.9 (5.3–16.7)
Honolulu County, Hawaii 970 6.0 1.1 (3.9–8.1)
Kauai County, Hawaii 227 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Maui County, Hawaii 363 9.7 2.1 (5.6–13.8)
Ada County, Idaho 253 12.2 3.1 (6.2–18.2)
Canyon County, Idaho 183 16.9 4.3 (8.6–25.2)
Cook County, Illinois 452 14.9 2.0 (11.0–18.7)
Lake County, Indiana 302 21.3 3.5 (14.5–28.1)
Marion County, Indiana 371 20.7 2.8 (15.4–26.1)
Polk County, Iowa 231 9.7 2.3 (5.1–14.3)
Johnson County, Kansas 648 11.1 1.5 (8.1–14.0)
Sedgwick County, Kansas 531 16.9 1.9 (13.2–20.6)
Shawnee County, Kansas 239 14.5 2.6 (9.4–19.6)
Wyandotte County, Kansas 314 29.0 3.4 (22.3–35.7)
Jefferson County, Kentucky 536 20.8 3.2 (14.4–27.2)
East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 179 25.0 4.4 (16.3–33.7)
Androscoggin County, Maine 183 24.1 3.7 (16.8–31.5)
Aroostook County, Maine 169 37.1 4.4 (28.4–45.7)
Cumberland County, Maine 513 14.9 1.8 (11.4–18.5)
Kennebec County, Maine 215 28.7 3.8 (21.3–36.1)
Penobscot County, Maine 249 28.0 3.4 (21.4–34.7)
York County, Maine 400 17.2 2.1 (13.0–21.3)
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 242 18.1 3.6 (11.1–25.2)
Baltimore County, Maryland 443 14.0 2.4 (9.3–18.7)
Charles County, Maryland 113 19.6 5.3 (9.2–30.0)
Frederick County, Maryland 226 16.8 3.6 (9.8–23.8)
Montgomery County, Maryland 438 7.6 1.6 (4.4–10.8)
Prince George´s County, Maryland 302 8.2 1.7 (5.0–11.5)
Washington County, Maryland 191 16.1 3.3 (9.7–22.6)
Baltimore city, Maryland 220 20.4 3.9 (12.8–27.9)
Barnstable County, Massachusetts 260 12.2 3.0 (6.4–18.0)
Bristol County, Massachusetts 832 23.2 2.8 (17.8–28.7)
Essex County, Massachusetts 787 14.3 1.9 (10.7–18.0)
Hampden County, Massachusetts 541 21.3 3.3 (14.9–27.7)
Middlesex County, Massachusetts 1,013 11.9 1.5 (8.9–14.8)
Norfolk County, Massachusetts 509 10.2 1.8 (6.7–13.8)
Plymouth County, Massachusetts 551 11.8 2.2 (7.5–16.0)
Suffolk County, Massachusetts 560 18.9 2.3 (14.4–23.5)
Worcester County, Massachusetts 708 18.1 2.3 (13.7–22.5)
Kent County, Michigan 148 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Macomb County, Michigan 185 16.4 3.6 (9.2–23.5)
Oakland County, Michigan 364 8.4 2.1 (4.3–12.4)
Wayne County, Michigan 720 11.9 1.7 (8.6–15.1)
Anoka County, Minnesota 116 10.5 3.0 (4.6–16.3)
Dakota County, Minnesota 143 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Hennepin County, Minnesota 813 8.9 1.5 (6.0–11.8)
Ramsey County, Minnesota 575 10.2 2.1 (6.1–14.2)
Jackson County, Missouri 299 22.2 4.6 (13.2–31.2)
St. Louis County, Missouri 288 15.8 3.9 (8.3–23.4)
Cascade County, Montana 249 18.0 2.7 (12.7–23.2)
Flathead County, Montana 172 14.5 3.4 (7.8–21.2)
Hill County, Montana 172 15.9 3.3 (9.5–22.3)
Lake County, Montana 336 19.1 3.0 (13.2–25.1)
Missoula County, Montana 219 17.2 3.2 (11.0–23.4)
Yellowstone County, Montana 216 21.6 3.1 (15.5–27.6)
Dakota County, Nebraska 284 26.4 3.2 (20.1–32.8)
Douglas County, Nebraska 953 12.1 1.4 (9.4–14.8)
Hall County, Nebraska 176 13.0 3.0 (7.1–18.9)
Lancaster County, Nebraska 286 9.8 2.0 (5.8–13.7)
Lincoln County, Nebraska 238 19.3 3.7 (12.1–26.5)
Sarpy County, Nebraska 295 11.2 2.2 (7.0–15.4)
Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska 247 13.9 2.7 (8.7–19.1)
Clark County, Nevada 493 14.2 1.9 (10.5–18.0)
Washoe County, Nevada 484 15.0 2.3 (10.5–19.6)
Belknap County, New Hampshire 225 15.6 3.1 (9.5–21.6)
Carroll County, New Hampshire 233 10.8 2.6 (5.8–15.9)
Cheshire County, New Hampshire 203 19.5 4.1 (11.4–27.6)
Coos County, New Hampshire 199 24.9 3.5 (18.1–31.8)
Grafton County, New Hampshire 209 14.9 2.9 (9.3–20.6)
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire 506 12.7 1.9 (9.0–16.3)
Merrimack County, New Hampshire 221 10.6 2.6 (5.6–15.7)
Rockingham County, New Hampshire 311 10.8 2.2 (6.4–15.2)
Strafford County, New Hampshire 203 12.2 2.9 (6.5–17.9)
Atlantic County, New Jersey 338 17.9 2.8 (12.4–23.4)
Bergen County, New Jersey 220 9.5 2.2 (5.2–13.7)
Burlington County, New Jersey 198 17.0 4.4 (8.3–25.7)
Camden County, New Jersey 204 14.7 3.6 (7.8–21.7)
Cape May County, New Jersey 225 13.7 2.6 (8.6–18.8)
Cumberland County, New Jersey 159 20.0 3.9 (12.4–27.6)
Essex County, New Jersey 275 12.8 2.6 (7.8–17.8)
Gloucester County, New Jersey 131 16.5 4.0 (8.6–24.4)
Hudson County, New Jersey 258 21.8 3.9 (14.2–29.4)
Hunterdon County, New Jersey 153 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Mercer County, New Jersey 147 10.8 3.2 (4.6–17.1)
Middlesex County, New Jersey 181 13.5 3.5 (6.8–20.3)
Monmouth County, New Jersey 213 9.2 2.2 (4.9–13.6)
Morris County, New Jersey 236 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Ocean County, New Jersey 237 11.1 2.4 (6.3–15.8)
Passaic County, New Jersey 142 21.8 4.3 (13.3–30.3)
Salem County, New Jersey 180 19.7 3.3 (13.2–26.2)
Somerset County, New Jersey 185 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Sussex County, New Jersey 158 14.4 3.5 (7.6–21.3)
Union County, New Jersey 154 20.8 4.3 (12.4–29.3)
Warren County, New Jersey 165 20.5 3.6 (13.5–27.6)
Bernalillo County, New Mexico 518 13.7 1.8 (10.2–17.2)
Dona Ana County, New Mexico 209 8.9 2.6 (3.9–14.0)
Sandoval County, New Mexico 189 13.6 3.2 (7.3–19.9)
San Juan County, New Mexico 174 24.5 4.0 (16.8–32.3)
Santa Fe County, New Mexico 197 15.4 3.3 (9.0–21.9)
Kings County, New York 62 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Guilford County, North Carolina 141 12.6 3.3 (6.2–19.0)
Mecklenburg County, North Carolina 129 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Robeson County, North Carolina 158 18.9 4.1 (10.8–26.9)
Wake County, North Carolina 118 14.3 3.7 (7.0–21.6)
Burleigh County, North Dakota 163 15.6 4.2 (7.4–23.9)
Cass County, North Dakota 231 8.1 1.8 (4.5–11.7)
Cuyahoga County, Ohio 226 17.4 4.1 (9.5–25.4)
Franklin County, Ohio 185 15.8 3.6 (8.8–22.8)
Hamilton County, Ohio 196 20.9 3.7 (13.6–28.2)
Lorain County, Ohio 218 18.1 3.7 (10.8–25.3)
Lucas County, Ohio 192 15.8 4.2 (7.6–23.9)
Mahoning County, Ohio 223 24.1 4.6 (15.1–33.2)
Montgomery County, Ohio 216 22.4 3.8 (15.0–29.8)
Stark County, Ohio 203 27.3 4.0 (19.5–35.1)
Summit County, Ohio 197 14.9 3.1 (8.8–21.1)
Oklahoma County, Oklahoma 283 14.2 2.3 (9.8–18.7)
Tulsa County, Oklahoma 366 15.2 2.1 (11.0–19.4)
Clackamas County, Oregon 158 13.4 3.2 (7.1–19.8)
Lane County, Oregon 171 14.8 3.3 (8.2–21.3)
Multnomah County, Oregon 224 14.3 3.3 (7.8–20.8)
Washington County, Oregon 169 7.8 2.3 (3.4–12.2)
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania 652 19.7 2.0 (15.7–23.7)
Bradford County, Pennsylvania 663 26.6 2.2 (22.4–30.9)
Montgomery County, Pennsylvania 133 10.4 2.9 (4.7–16.2)
Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania 560 19.3 2.2 (15.0–23.6)
Pike County, Pennsylvania 737 12.2 1.2 (9.7–14.6)
Kent County, Rhode Island 214 13.1 2.8 (7.6–18.5)
Providence County, Rhode Island 909 14.9 1.5 (12.0–17.8)
Washington County, Rhode Island 243 8.2 2.1 (4.1–12.4)
Aiken County, South Carolina 188 15.0 2.9 (9.3–20.7)
Beaufort County, South Carolina 418 6.9 1.6 (3.7–10.0)
Charleston County, South Carolina 325 14.0 2.8 (8.5–19.5)
Greenville County, South Carolina 249 24.3 4.0 (16.4–32.2)
Horry County, South Carolina 264 14.2 2.5 (9.3–19.2)
Richland County, South Carolina 262 16.4 3.4 (9.8–23.1)
Spartanburg County, South Carolina 207 29.0 4.9 (19.5–38.6)
Lincoln County, South Dakota 123 9.5 2.5 (4.5–14.5)
Minnehaha County, South Dakota 147 19.9 4.6 (10.9–28.8)
Pennington County, South Dakota 142 15.9 3.5 (9.1–22.6)
Davidson County, Tennessee 152 17.2 4.4 (8.5–25.9)
Shelby County, Tennessee 125 17.6 3.7 (10.3–24.8)
Bexar County, Texas 167 10.1 2.8 (4.6–15.7)
Dallas County, Texas 124 14.5 3.8 (7.1–21.9)
El Paso County, Texas 193 9.1 2.2 (4.7–13.5)
Harris County, Texas 130 12.8 3.9 (5.3–20.4)
Hidalgo County, Texas 182 12.1 3.5 (5.3–18.9)
Tarrant County, Texas 149 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Travis County, Texas 290 8.3 1.9 (4.6–12.0)
Davis County, Utah 264 12.1 2.3 (7.6–16.6)
Salt Lake County, Utah 1,000 11.7 1.4 (9.0–14.4)
Tooele County, Utah 137 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Utah County, Utah 350 10.6 1.9 (6.9–14.3)
Wasatch County, Utah 152 N/A* N/A* (N/A–N/A*)
Weber County, Utah 279 9.7 2.0 (5.7–13.7)
Chittenden County, Vermont 228 14.9 2.9 (9.3–20.6)
Rutland County, Vermont 188 13.4 2.9 (7.6–19.1)
Washington County, Vermont 132 15.8 3.7 (8.5–23.2)
Windsor County, Vermont 199 13.7 2.9 (8.0–19.5)
Fairfax County, Virginia 156 N/A N/A (N/A–N/A)
Clark County, Washington 227 8.1 1.9 (4.3–11.9)
King County, Washington 1,084 6.1 0.9 (4.3–8.0)
Kitsap County, Washington 193 10.0 2.8 (4.6–15.5)
Pierce County, Washington 298 15.3 2.8 (9.9–20.8)
Snohomish County, Washington 278 13.8 3.4 (7.1–20.5)
Spokane County, Washington 323 14.3 2.7 (8.9–19.7)
Thurston County, Washington 156 13.6 3.7 (6.3–21.0)
Whatcom County, Washington 268 7.6 2.1 (3.5–11.7)
Yakima County, Washington 155 16.8 3.6 (9.7–23.9)
Kanawha County, West Virginia 194 30.6 3.9 (23.0–38.2)
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin 239 12.6 3.2 (6.3–19.0)
Laramie County, Wyoming 373 14.4 2.1 (10.2–18.6)
Natrona County, Wyoming 308 18.4 3.3 (12.0–24.7)
San Juan Municipio, Puerto Rico 207 14.7 3.1 (8.7–20.7)
Median 14.5
Range 5.8–37.1

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SE = standard error.
* Estimate not available (N/A) if the unweighted sample size for the denominator was <50 or if the relative standard error is >0.3.

Return to your place in the textTABLE 22. Estimated prevalence of adults aged 50–75 years who received a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines,* by state/territory — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, United States, 2012
State/Territory Sample
size
% SE 95% CI
Alabama 4,673 65.9 1.0 (64.0–67.9)
Alaska 1,873 56.0 1.6 (52.9–59.2)
Arizona 3,525 58.5 1.4 (55.8–61.2)
Arkansas 2,485 56.8 1.3 (54.2–59.3)
California 5,512 67.2 0.9 (65.3–69.0)
Colorado 5,779 65.2 0.8 (63.6–66.8)
Connecticut 4,019 72.2 1.0 (70.3–74.1)
Delaware 2,490 71.5 1.3 (69.0–74.0)
District of Columbia 1,727 67.2 1.9 (63.4–70.9)
Florida 3,665 66.0 1.2 (63.6–68.4)
Georgia 2,894 67.7 1.2 (65.4–70.0)
Hawaii 3,255 64.9 1.3 (62.3–67.5)
Idaho 2,973 60.4 1.5 (57.5–63.3)
Illinois 2,657 60.9 1.3 (58.4–63.5)
Indiana 4,003 60.5 1.0 (58.5–62.4)
Iowa 3,312 66.2 0.9 (64.3–68.1)
Kansas 5,773 64.7 0.8 (63.1–66.3)
Kentucky 5,669 63.0 1.0 (61.0–64.9)
Louisiana 4,760 60.2 1.1 (58.0–62.3)
Maine 5,050 73.4 0.8 (72.0–74.9)
Maryland 6,275 70.8 0.9 (68.9–72.6)
Massachusetts 9,527 76.4 0.7 (75.1–77.8)
Michigan 5,222 69.2 0.9 (67.5–70.9)
Minnesota 5,558 70.6 0.8 (69.0–72.2)
Mississippi 4,034 58.4 1.0 (56.4–60.4)
Missouri 3,261 64.1 1.2 (61.7–66.5)
Montana 4,203 56.4