Resources

Surveillance Reports
MMWRs
Bibliography

2005-2018 MMP Bibliography pdf icon[PDF – 384 KB]

Free full-text archive of MMP publications can be found here no later than 12 months after the publication date:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/external icon

Fact Sheets, Infographics, and Slide Sets

Fact Sheets

Infographics

Resilience Among Those Aged 50 or Older
Hepatitis B Vaccination Among Persons in HIV Care
Infographic for persons living with HIV
Have you been vaccinated for Hepatitis B? 1 in 3 people living with HIV have not been vaccinated. Hepatitis B is common among people living with HIV. Complications include liver cancer, cirrhosis, or even death. Ask your provider about getting the Hepatitis B vaccine, which is both safe and effective.

Example social media messaging:

#DYK 1 in 3 people in #HIV care in the US have not been vaccinated for the #hepatitis B virus (also known as #HBV). Have you? Learn more about HIV and HBV at https://bit.ly/2MK588b and gaps in HBV vaccination at https://bit.ly/2IQfX6f. #HepatitisB #GetVaccinated

Infographic for HIV providers
Are your patients among the 1 in 3 who have not been vaccinated for Hepatitis B? 1 in 3 people living with HIV have not been vaccinated for Hepatitis B? Tell patients that the vaccine is safe and effective. Give the first vaccine dose at the first HIV care visit regardless of viral load or CD4 count. Use clinical reminders and standing orders to vaccinate.

Example social media messaging:

#DYK 1 in 3 people in #HIV care in the US have not been vaccinated for the #hepatitis B virus (also known as #HBV). Have your patients? Learn more about gaps in HBV vaccination at https://bit.ly/2IQfX6f. Watch the video at https://bit.ly/2tUmkQO. #HepatitisB

Internalized HIV-Related Stigma Among Persons in HIV Care
Image 1: Almost 8 in 10 HIV patients in the United States report feeling internalized HIV-related stigma.
Almost 8 in 10 HIV patients in the United States report feeling internalized HIV-related stigma. How can people living with HIV reduce internalized stigma? •	Think about the negative beliefs you may have about yourself. Ask yourself if they are really true. •	Take HIV medicine as prescribed to keep an undetectable viral load—that means the level of HIV in your body is so low that a test can’t detect it. Getting and keeping an undetectable viral load can reduce internalized stigma by keeping you healthy and protecting your partner. •	Find a counselor who can help you deal with any negative thoughts and feelings about your HIV status. •	Join support groups and organizations that help people living with HIV. These groups offer a safe environment and can help you overcome the challenges of living with HIV. https://go.usa.gov/xnMzn

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Image 2: Which groups are most affected by internalized HIV-related stigma?
Which groups are most affected by internalized HIV-related stigma? Percentage reporting internalized stigma: •	This bar chart shows the percentage of people reporting internalized stigma, by race/ethnicity: African American=80%; Hispanic/Latino=86%; Other/Multiracial=79%; white=74%. •	This bar chart shows the percentage of people reporting internalized stigma, by age: 18-29=82%; 30-39=83%; 40-49=80%; 50+=77%. •	This bar chart shows the percentage of people reporting internalized stigma, by gender: men=78%; transgender=82%; women=83%. https://go.usa.gov/xnMzn

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Image 3: What is Internalized HIV-related stigma?
What is internalized HIV-related stigma? Person thinking “I am ashamed that I am HIV-positive.” Person thinking “I hide my HIV status from others.”  Person thinking “Being HIV- positive makes me feel dirty.” Person thinking “It is difficult to tell people about my HIV infection.” Person thinking “I feel guilty that I am HIV-positive.” Person thinking “I sometimes feel worthless because I am HIV-positive.” Graph showing that nearly 2 out of 3 people say it is difficult to tell others about their HIV infection. Graph showing that roughly 1 out of 3 people report feeling guilty or ashamed of their HIV status. Graph showing that nearly 1 in 4 people say that being HIV-positive makes them feel dirty or worthless. https://go.usa.gov/xnMzn

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Image 4: Live well with HIV
Live Well With HIV - Take HIV medicine as prescribed - Stay in HIV care - Share your status - Protect your partners - HIV TREATMENT CAN KEEP YOU HEALTHY AND PROTECT OTHERS - If you are living with HIV, get in care and start treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you start treatment, the more you benefit. Taking HIV medicine as prescribed can make the level of HIV in your blood very low (called viral suppression) or even undetectable. Getting and keeping an undetectable viral load is the best thing you can do to stay healthy. Also, if you stay undetectable, you have effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to an HIV-negative partner through sex. Learn more about living with HIV at www.cdc.gov/hivtreatmentworks. https://go.usa.gov/xnMzn

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Image 5: Roughly 1 out of 3 report feeling guilty or ashamed of their HIV status.
Roughly 1 out of 3 report feeling guilty or ashamed of their HIV status.

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Image 7: Nearly 2 out of 3 say that it is difficult to tell others about their HIV infection.
Nearly 2 out of 3 say that it is difficult to tell others about their HIV infection.

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Image 6: Nearly 1 in 4 say that being HIV-positive makes them feel dirty or worthless.
Nearly 1 in 4 say that being HIV-positive makes them feel dirty or worthless.

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Slide Sets

Medical Monitoring Project 2015 Cycle

Download the complete slide set:

Medical Monitoring Project 2014 Cycle

Download the complete slide set:

Medical Monitoring Project 2013 Cycle

Download the complete slide set:

Questionnaires

Interview Instruments

English

Spanish

HIV Medication Card

  • For copies of the MMP Medication Card please contact CDC.
Medical Record Abstraction

Medical Record Abstraction Forms