Sample Social Media Content

Use these Tweets and Facebook messages on your social media platforms to spread the word about flu prevention in your community.

Twitter: Samples Tweets

Click the share button next to each message to automatically post this message to twitter. Or copy and paste into your twitter feed to share flu vaccination messages with your followers.

General Public
  • It is not too late to get a flu vaccine. CDC recommends #flu vaccination as long as influenza viruses are circulating. https://go.usa.gov/xnHJHExternal #FightFlu
  • While #flu vaccination is the most important way to prevent flu, flu antiviral drugs are the most important way to treat flu. https://go.usa.gov/xnHJhExternal #FightFlu
  • As flu activity continues to spread across the U.S., take 3 steps to #FightFlu:
  1. Take time to get a flu vaccine! It’s not too late.
  2. Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.
  3. Take antiviral drugs to treat flu, if prescribed to you. https://go.usa.gov/xRpeJExternal
  • #Flu activity is on the rise. Be sure you know common flu symptoms and get vaccinated to protect yourself from flu. https://go.usa.gov/xEDCfExternal #FightFlu
  • #FluTip: Help stop the spread of germs at home, work and school with these 6 health habits: https://go.usa.gov/xnHScExternal
  • Is it a cold or #flu? Both are respiratory illnesses, but are caused by different viruses. Learn more about the differences between the common cold and flu. https://go.usa.gov/xEDr8External
  • Are you sick with #flu? Stay home and avoid close contact with others, except if you need medical care. Prescription drugs called “antivirals” can lessen symptoms and prevent complications, if started early. https://go.usa.gov/xnHJhExternal
  • Here’s what to do if you get sick with flu: http://go.usa.gov/xEDrKExternal
  • Most people with flu will have mild illness and do not need medical care. However, stay alert for emergency warning signs of flu sickness, such as difficulty breathing. http://go.usa.gov/xEDrKExternal
  • #Flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started soon after flu symptoms begin. Talk to your doctor about the best treatment for your illness: https://go.usa.gov/xEDr3External
  • Be in the know this #fluseason, and get the latest updates on flu activity in the U.S. and in your state. Read CDC’s weekly #FluView surveillance report for details: https://go.usa.gov/xnHSqExternal
Parents
  • Tragically, children die from flu every year; about 80% of reported pediatric flu deaths occur in children who had not received a #flu vaccine. Get your kids vaccinated today. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSCExternal
  • Did you know? #Flu vaccination has been shown to reduce flu-associated deaths among healthy children by 65%. Learn more about the benefits of #flu vaccination: https://go.usa.gov/xPb35External
  • #Flu is more dangerous than the common cold for children. Parents and caregivers: here’s what you need to know to protect the children in your life. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSCExternal
  • #Flu germs spread when sick people sneeze or cough. Kids can learn more facts from Ready Wrigley’s adventure: https://go.usa.gov/xnHSrExternal
  • Did you know #flu antiviral drugs can treat flu and can be taken by children? More information: https://go.usa.gov/xnHSYExternal
Older Adults (Age 65+)
  • CDC recommends #flu vaccination as long as flu viruses are circulating. There are 2 flu vaccine options designed specifically for people aged 65+ years; both aim to create a better immune response. https://go.usa.gov/xRptsExternal
  • During most flu seasons, people aged 65+ years bear the greatest burden of severe flu disease. Take these actions to protect yourself this #fluseason. https://go.usa.gov/xRptsExternal
  • Did you know? Human immune defenses become weaker with age, placing some aged 65+ years at greater risk of flu related complications. Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xRptsExternal
  • Are you 65+ years old and experiencing flu symptoms? Seek medical advice quickly to see whether you might need medical evaluation or treatment with antiviral drugs. More tips: https://go.usa.gov/xRptsExternal
  • Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious flu-related complication that can cause death. CDC recommends adults aged 65+ years receive one or more pneumococcal vaccines. Talk to your doctor about which vaccines are best for you. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSaExternal
People with Chronic Medical Conditions
  • #Flu can make some chronic medical conditions worse, even if they are well managed. CDC recommends flu vaccination as long as flu viruses are circulating to reduce your risk of flu illness and flu-related complications. https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
  • #Flu is serious and can be especially dangerous for people at high risk of flu-related complications. See if you are at high risk, and take steps to protect yourself and loved ones. https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
  • The most common underlying medical conditions among children hospitalized with #flu are asthma and neurologic conditions. Learn ways to protect your kids from flu. https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
  • Do you have #flu symptoms? Seek medical care promptly if you are very sick or are at high risk of flu complications. https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
  • If you have #flu and are at high risk of serious flu complications, treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness and having a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay: https://go.usa.gov/xnHJhExternal
Health Care Providers
  • Health care providers are trusted sources of health info. Stay informed on the latest antiviral recommendations. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSWExternal
  • Clinicians: CDC recommends that if you suspect #flu in a severely ill or high-risk patient, don’t wait for the results of a flu test before beginning antiviral treatment. Antiviral drugs work better the earlier you begin treatment. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSWExternal
LAIV Recommendation
  • The nasal spray vaccine, also known as FluMist®, is again recommended as a #flu vaccine option for the 2018-2019 #fluseason. See other recommendation updates for this season: https://go.usa.gov/xPbquExternal
  • For the 2018-2019 #fluseason, CDC & ACIP recommend nasal spray flu vaccine as an option for people 2 years through 49 years of age who are not pregnant. Learn more about this recommendation: https://go.usa.gov/xPb3DExternal
Facebook: Sample Posts

Copy and paste into your Facebook newsfeed to share flu vaccination messages with your followers.

General Public
  • Take these 3 actions to fight flu this season:
  1. Get a flu vaccine.
  2. Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.
  3. Take antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them. https://go.usa.gov/xRpeJExternal
  • Influenza (flu) is a serious disease that causes hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations, and tens of thousands of deaths in the United States each year. Here’s what to do if you or a loved one becomes sick with flu this season: https://go.usa.gov/xEDrKExternal
  • CDC recommends flu antiviral drugs to treat illness in people who are very sick with flu and those at high risk of serious flu complications. https://go.usa.gov/xnHJhExternal
  • Flu and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different viruses. It can be difficult to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone and may require special diagnostic tests. Learn some of the differences between cold and flu: https://go.usa.gov/xEDr8External
Parents
  • While flu vaccination is the most important way to prevent influenza, antiviral drugs are the most important way to treat influenza infection. Studies have shown that early treatment with a flu antiviral drug can shorten the duration of fever and illness symptoms, and can reduce the risk of serious flu complications. Protect yourself and your family against flu with these tips: https://go.usa.gov/xnHSCExternal
  • Flu can be a serious disease for children of all ages and lead to hospitalization or, in rare cases, death. Protect your family from flu this season. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSCExternal
  • Flu is more dangerous than the common cold for children. Parents and caregivers: here’s what you need to know to protect the children in your life. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSCExternal
Older Adults (Age 65+)
  • There are flu vaccine options available for people 65 years and older that aim to create a better immune response than standard flu vaccine. Learn more about high dose and adjuvanted vaccines, and how to fight flu at https://go.usa.gov/xRptsExternal
  • Are you 65 years or older and experiencing flu symptoms? Seek medical advice quickly to see whether you might need medical evaluation or treatment with antiviral drugs. https://go.usa.gov/xRptsExternal
  • During most flu seasons, people 65 years and older bear the greatest burden of severe flu illness. As immune defenses become weaker with age, people in this age group are at risk of having serious flu-related complications. If you or a loved one is 65 years and older, here’s what you should know: https://go.usa.gov/xRptsExternal
  • Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious flu-related complication that can cause death. CDC recommends adults aged 65+ years receive one or more pneumococcal vaccines. Talk to your doctor about which vaccines are best for you. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSaExternal
People with Chronic Medical Conditions
  • Flu can make some chronic medical conditions worse, even if they are well managed. CDC recommends flu vaccination as long as flu viruses are circulating to reduce your risk of flu illness and flu-related complications. https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
  • Some people are more likely to have serious flu complications that can result in hospitalization or even death. Learn who is at high risk for flu-related complications here: https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
  • Diabetes, asthma, and heart disease (even well managed) are among the most common long-term medical conditions that put people at high risk for serious flu complications. If you are at high-risk of complications from flu and have flu symptoms, seek medical care promptly as you may need antiviral treatment. https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
  • The most common underlying medical conditions among children hospitalized with flu are asthma and neurologic conditions. Learn ways to protect your kids from flu. https://go.usa.gov/xRptuExternal
Health Care Providers
  • Clinicians: CDC recommends that if you suspect flu in a severely ill or high-risk patient, don’t wait for the results of a flu test before beginning antiviral treatment. Antiviral drugs work better the earlier you begin treatment; prompt action is key. https://go.usa.gov/xnHSWExternal
LAIV Recommendation
  • LAIV, also known as FluMist®, is again recommended for use during the 2018 – 2019 season. Review additional recommendation updates for this season: https://go.usa.gov/xPbquExternal
  • CDC and ACIP recommend yearly flu vaccination for everyone 6 months and older as the best protection against flu. This year, nasal spray flu vaccine is again a recommended option for people 2 years through 49 years of age who are not pregnant. Learn more about this recommendation: https://go.usa.gov/xPb3DExternal