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High blood pressure is a common and dangerous condition. Having high blood pressure means the pressure of the blood in your blood vessels is higher than it should be. But you can take steps to control your blood pressure and lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.About 1 of 3 U.S. adults—or about 75 million people—have high blood pressure.1Only about half (54%) of these people have their high blood pressure under control.1 This common condition increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, 2 of the leading causes of death for Americans.2Get more quick facts about high blood pressure, or learn more about high blood pressure in the United States.

High blood pressure is called the “silent killer” because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people do not know they have it. That’s why it is important to check your blood pressure regularly.

The good news is that you can take steps to prevent high blood pressure or to control it if your blood pressure is already high.

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Stroke Survivors Stories

DHDSP Recognizes Stroke Survivors
In observance of National Stroke Awareness Month this May, the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention (DHDSP) is spotlighting stroke survivors and the importance of stroke awareness. Visit our new Survivor Stories webpage to learn more about stroke and how it can happen to anyone, even fitness enthusiasts and new moms.

Best Practices for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Programs

Best Practices Guide for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention
Current strategies for controlling cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, are not widely used as standard practice. CDC developed this guide to provide health professionals with evidence-based strategies for effective and sustainable CVD prevention, including health and economic impact and potential for reducing health disparities.

Person getting their blood pressure taken.

2017 Hypertension Clinical Practice Guidelines Released
The “2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines” was released on Monday, November 13, 2017.

Tips for Taking Blood Pressure Medication as Directed

Video: Tips for Taking Blood Pressure Medicines As Directed
High blood pressure (hypertension) is one of the leading causes of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and death in the United States. One major cause of poor blood pressure control is not taking medications at the right time and in the right amount. Learn the steps you can take to help you or your loved ones.

Self-Measure Blood Pressure Monitoring

Million Hearts® Action Guide: Self-Measured Blood Pressure Monitoring [PDF-1M]
Clinicians, public health practitioners, health care systems, and individuals can improve blood pressure control and health outcomes for patients with high blood pressure. Self-measured blood pressuring monitoring is one strategy to reach those objectives.

Reference

  1. Merai R, Siegel C, Rakotz M, Basch P, Wright J, Wong B; DHSc., Thorpe P. CDC Grand Rounds: A Public Health Approach to Detect and Control Hypertension. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2016 Nov 18;65(45):1261-1264
  2. Yoon SS, Fryar CD, Carroll MD. Hypertension Prevalence and Control Among Adults: United States, 2011-2014. NCHS data brief, no 220. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2015.
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