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Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure to Tobacco in Media Among Middle and High School Students—United States, 2004


This page is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being updated.

April 1, 2005 / Vol. 54 / No. 12


MMWR Highlights

High School
  • From 2002 to 2004, among high school students, there was no significant decline in the use of tobacco products overall (28.2%) or for any individual tobacco product.
  • In 2004, cigarettes (21.7%) were the most commonly used product, followed by cigars (12.9%), smokeless tobacco (5.5%), pipes (3.2%), bidis (2.7%), and kreteks (2.5%).
  • Among non–Hispanic blacks from 2002 to 2004, decreases were observed in the use of any tobacco product (from 21.7% to 16.8%) and pipes (from 3.7% to 1.7%).
  • Among Hispanics from 2002 to 2004, cigar use increased from 10.8 percent to 13.5%, and bidi use increased from 3.5% to 4.8%.
  • From 2002 to 2004, a significant overall decline was observed among high school students who reported seeing actors using tobacco on television or in movies (from 91.3% to 86.6%).
  • During 2002–2004, a significant increase was observed in seeing tobacco products on the Internet (from 33.5% to 38.6%).
  • Among current smokers aged <18 years in high school, 63.4% were not asked to show proof of age when they purchased or attempted to purchase cigarettes from a store, and 61.2% were not refused purchase of cigarettes because of their age. No significant differences were observed from 2002.
Middle School
  • In 2004, 11.8% of middle school students used any tobacco product. Cigarettes (8.4%) were the most commonly used, followed by cigars (5.3%), smokeless tobacco (2.8%), bidis (2.4 percent), and kreteks (1.6%). There was no significant difference in use of any of these products from 2002.
  • Among middle school students, pipe use declined significantly from 3.5% in 2002 to 2.7% in 2004.
  • From 2002 to 2004, declines among males were observed in the use of cigarettes (from 9.8% to 7.9%), pipes (from 5.1% to 3.5%), and kreteks (from 2.7% to 2.0%).
  • From 2002 to 2004, declines among Asians were observed in the use of cigarettes (from 7.4% to 2.7%), cigars (from 5.0% to 1.2%), and pipes (from 4.6% to 1.5%).
  • Among non–Hispanic blacks, use of pipes decreased from 3.9% in 2002 to 2.2% in 2004.
  • Among Hispanics from 2002 to 2004, significant increases were observed in the use of cigars (from 6.3% to 8.2%) and bidis (from 2.9% to 4.3%).
  • From 2002 to 2004, decreases were observed in seeing actors use tobacco on television or in movies (from 89.9% to 77.8%), and seeing advertisements for tobacco products on the Internet (from 42.7% to 34.1%).
  • In 2004, 69.9% of current cigarette smokers in middle school were not asked to show proof of age when they purchased or attempted to purchase cigarettes from a store, and 68.5% were not refused purchase of cigarettes because of their age. No significant differences were observed from 2002.

 


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