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Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults in the United States

Overview

  • Nearly 18 of every 100 U.S. adults aged 18 years or older (17.8%) currently smoke cigarettes. This means an estimated 42.1 million adults in the United States currently smoke cigarettes.1
  • Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, accounting for more than 480,000 deaths every year, or 1 of every 5 deaths.2
  • More than 16 million Americans live with a smoking-related disease.2
  • Current smoking has declined from nearly 21 of every 100 adults (20.9%) in 2005 to nearly 18 of every 100 adults (17.8%) in 2013.1

Current Smoking Among Adults in 2013 (Nation)

Note:

  • Current smokers are defined as persons who reported smoking at least 100 cigarettes during their lifetime and who, at the time they participated in a survey about this topic, reported smoking every day or some days.
Overall1
  • About 1 in 5 or nearly 18 of every 100 American adults (17.8%)

By Gender1
  • More than 20 of every 100 adult men (20.5%)
  • About 15 of every 100 adult women (15.3%)

Note:

  • Men were more likely to be current cigarette smokers than women.

By Age1
  • Nearly 19 of every 100 adults aged 18–24 years (18.7%)
  • About 20 of every 100 adults aged 25–44 years (20.1%)
  • Nearly 20 of every 100 adults aged 45–64 years (19.9%)
  • Nearly 9 of every 100 adults aged 65 years and older (8.8%)

Note:

  • Current cigarette smoking was higher among persons aged 18–24 years, 25–44 years, and 45–64 years than among those aged 65 years and older.

By Race/Ethnicity1
  • About 26 of every 100 non-Hispanic American Indians/Alaska Natives (26.1%)
  • More than 9 of every 100 non-Hispanic Asians (9.6%)
  • About 18 of every 100 non-Hispanic Blacks (18.3%)
  • About 12 of every 100 Hispanics (12.1%)
  • More than 19 of every 100 non-Hispanic Whites (19.4%)
  • Nearly 27 of every 100 non-Hispanic multiple race individuals (26.8%)

Notes:

  • Current cigarette smoking was highest among people of multiple races and non-Hispanic American Indians/Alaska Natives and lowest among Asians.
  • Non-Hispanic Asians do not include Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders.

By Education1
  • About 24 of every 100 adults with 12 or fewer years of education (no diploma) (24.2%)
  • More than 41 of every 100 adults with a graduate education degree (GED) certificate (41.4%)
  • 22 of every 100 adults with a high school diploma (22.0%)
  • Nearly 18 of every 100 adults with an associate's degree (17.8%)
  • Nearly 21 of every 100 adults with some college, no diploma (20.9%)
  • About 9 of every 100 adults with an undergraduate college degree (9.1%)
  • More than 5 of every 100 adults with a graduate degree (5.6%)

Note:

  • Current cigarette smoking was highest among persons with a GED certificate and lowest among those with a graduate degree.

By Poverty Status1
  • About 29 of every 100 adults who live below the poverty level (29.2%)
  • About 16 of every 100 adults who live at or above the poverty level (16.2%)

Notes:

  • Current cigarette smoking was higher among persons living below the poverty level than those living at or above this level.
  • Poverty thresholds are based on U.S. Census Bureau data.

By U.S. Census Region1
  • More than 20 of every 100 adults who live in the Midwest (20.5%)
  • About 19 of every 100 adults who live in the South (19.2%)
  • Nearly 17 of every 100 adults who live in the Northeast (16.9%)
  • More than 13 of every 100 adults who live in the West (13.6%)

Note:

  • Current cigarette smoking was higher in the Midwest and South than in the Northeast and West.

By Disability/Limitation1
  • 23 of every 100 adults who reported having a disability/limitation (23.0%)
  • 17 of every 100 adults who reported having no disability/limitation (17.0%)

Note:

  • Current cigarette smoking was higher among persons with a disability/limitation than among those with no disability/limitation.

By Sexual Orientation1
  • More than 26 of every 100 lesbian/gay/bisexual adults (26.6%)
  • More than 17 of every 100 straight adults (17.6%)

Note:

  • Lesbian/gay/bisexual adults were more likely to be current smokers than straight adults.

Current Smoking Among Adults in 2013 (States)

  • Current smoking ranged from about 10 of every 100 adults in Utah (10.3%) to about 27 of every 100 adults in West Virginia (27.3%).3

The figures represent the percentage of the population who are current smokers

The figures represent the percentage of the population who are current smokers.4




Note: These data are periodically updated on the following CDC Web sites:

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults—United States, 2005–2013.. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2014;63(47):1108–12 [accessed 2015 Jan 22].
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2015 Jan 22].
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Prevalence and Trends Data, 2013. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2013 [accessed 2015 Jan 22].
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation System. Interactive Maps: Cigarette Use—Adult Current Smokers—BRFSS [accessed 2015 Jan 22].

For Further Information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office on Smoking and Health
E-mail: tobaccoinfo@cdc.gov
Phone: 1-800-CDC-INFO

Media Inquiries: Contact CDC's Office on Smoking and Health press line at 770-488-5493.

 


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