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Campaign Resources

Learn more about the health damage smoking causes — and help spread the word. Tips From Former Smokers campaign resources available here include buttons and badges, videos, social media content, print ads from the campaign, and more, often tailored for specific audiences.

If you are a CDC partner or member of the press, please see the Newsroom for more resources.

Additional campaign materials are available free, for a limited time, at CDC's Tips From Former Smokers Download Center.


Badges and Buttons

Place Tips from Former Smokers badges and buttons on your own Web site.

Example of button for general public

Buttons for the General Public Share the message of the Tips campaign on your Web site.

Example of button for healthcare providers

Buttons for Healthcare Providers Let other physicians and providers know about the Tips campaign.

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Videos

Videos featuring Tips television commercials and extended interviews with Tips From Former Smokers participants, where they tell their stories and experiences related to smoking and secondhand smoke.


Anthem AdAnthem Ad This TV ad, from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, features Shane, Sharon, and Shawn — three people who have stomas as a result of their smoking. They provide tips on how to live with this condition.

Beatrice's StoryBeatrice's Story Beatrice's son, Nick, wrote her a letter urging her to quit smoking. In this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, she tells how this act of love gave her the courage to end a lifelong habit.

Beatrice: I Told Everyone I Stopped SmokingBeatrice: "I Told Everyone I Stopped Smoking" Beatrice describes some of the techniques she used to recognize and avoid her smoking triggers that helped her to quit smoking. Even though it was hard to do, by making a plan and sticking to it, she beat her addiction to cigarettes and stopped smoking for good. This video is part of CDC's campaign, Tips From Former Smokers.

Bill's Ad: Smoking and DiabetesBill's Ad: Smoking and Diabetes Bill has diabetes and he used to smoke. Cigarette smoking made his diabetes much worse. In this TV spot from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Bill explains that he experienced a number of health problems by the age of 40, including kidney failure, blindness in one eye, and a leg amputated due to poor circulation. Bill suggests that smokers make a list of everything they are willing to give up if they continue to smoke.

Bill's StoryBill: Smoking and Diabetes Don't Mix Bill, a person with diabetes, started smoking at 15, not realizing the problems it would eventually cause him and his family. He didn't stop smoking until he was almost 40—after having had a leg amputated. In this emotional video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Bill says he is glad he quit before losing everything, and he encourages others to quit, too.

Brandon's StoryBrandon's Story Brandon describes losing his foot, fingers, and other body parts to Buerger's disease, a disorder linked to smoking, and testifies to the strength of addiction in this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Buerger's Disease AdBuerger's Disease Ad Smoking causes Buerger's disease, which can lead to amputations. In this TV ad, Brandon and Marie talk about living with the effects of Buerger's disease as part of CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Cessation Tips AdCessation Tips Ad You can quit smoking! This inspiring TV ad features Beatrice, James and Wilma — three people who successfully quit smoking after many years. They share their practical tips on how to quit for good in this ad from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Ellie: It was Terrifying to Get an Asthma AttackEllie: "It was Terrifying to Get an Asthma Attack" Ellie was in her mid-30's when she had her first asthma attack — triggered by exposure to secondhand smoke. She loved her job as a bartender, but began to dread going to work. In this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign she says, "I could feel my lungs getting tighter. I knew I couldn't be around the smoke or I was going to die, or something bad was going to happen to me." Eventually Ellie quit her job for the sake of her health, but feels everyone deserves to have a safe and healthy work environment.

Jamason's StoryJamason: "I Didn't Know Why I Couldn't Breathe" Jamason and his mother Sherri talk about the day Jamason had to go to the hospital after having a severe asthma attack at work, triggered by exposure to secondhand smoke. Recounting the drive to the hospital, Sherri said, "I just held his hand, and told him just squeeze it every now and then so I know he's breathing." In this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Jamason admits that after such a severe attack, he was afraid to leave the hospital because he knew that outside, in the real world, people smoke.

James' StoryJames' Story James started smoking as a kid to be like his father. He discusses his father's health problems and their relationship in this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

James: I Can't Be Diabetic and Smoke TooJames: "I Can't Be Diabetic and Smoke Too" When James was told he had diabetes, he knew he had to stop smoking in order to better manage his health. His healthcare provider told him that he needed to exercise more, and he found that smoking cigarettes made exercising difficult. For James, this became an important reason to quit smoking for good. This video is part of CDC's campaign, Tips From Former Smokers.

James: No, I Won't Buy You SmokesJames: "No, I Won't Buy You Smokes" You never know when a decision you make could undermine your choice to quit smoking. James describes a moment he had with his roommate after he had resolved to stop smoking cigarettes. James realized the potential for relapse, and took steps to make sure that it didn't happen. This video is part of CDC's campaign, Tips From Former Smokers.

Jessica's Asthma AdJessica's Asthma Ad Exposure to secondhand smoke can trigger a life-threatening asthma attack. This TV ad, from CDC's Tips campaign, features Jessica, a mother with a young son who suffers from asthma attacks due to secondhand smoke exposure. In her tip, she urges people not to be shy to tell people not to smoke around kids.

Un consejo de Jessica sobre el asmaJessica in Spanish: Un consejo de Jessica sobre el asma (en Español) La exposición al humo de segunda mano puede provocar un ataque de asma que puede ser mortal. Este comercial de televisión de la campaña de los CDC Consejos de exfumadores, muestra a Jessica, la madre de un niño pequeño que tiene ataques de asma por la exposición al humo de segunda mano. Ella les pide a las personas que no les dé pena decirles a otras que no fumen cerca de sus hijos.

Mariano: La suerte de tener otra oportunidadMariano in Spanish: La suerte de tener otra oportunidad (en Español) Mariano fumó cigarrillos durante 30 años. Un día se despertó y se sintió mareado y con náuseas. "No sabía qué me pasaba y empecé a sudar". Mariano necesitó una operación a corazón abierto para salvar su vida. En este video de la campaña de los CDC Consejos de exfumadores, él afirma: "Tuve la suerte de tener una segunda oportunidad en la vida". Mariano espera que otros no arriesguen su salud y que dejen de fumar hoy.

Marie's StoryMarie's Story Marie talks about discovering she had Buerger’s disease, an illness caused by smoking, and its effects on her life in this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Michael's Ad: COPD and SmokingMichael's Ad: COPD and Smoking Michael, who is in his 50s, has Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) —a condition caused by smoking—that makes it harder and harder to breathe. In this TV commercial from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Michael offers a tip that if your doctor gives you 5 years to live, like his doctor did, spend it sharing your wisdom and love with your children and grandchildren so they have something to remember you by.

Michael: My body screamed for air!Michael: I Live in Constant Fear Michael, an Alaska Native, was shocked when doctors found serious lung damage from smoking. He was only 44. In this video, Michael talks about living in constant fear. Smoking gave him COPD, a disease that makes it harder and harder to breathe. He says, "If I get the flu, I can die."

Michael: My body screamed for air!Michael: "My body screamed for air!" Michael suffers from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), which makes it harder for a person to breathe and can cause death. In this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Michael talks about how he wishes he had never started smoking, and the damage it caused to his lungs. He describes waking up one morning unable to breathe and having to go to the hospital. He also talks about the pain his condition has brought to his family.

Michael's I started smoking at age nineMichael: I Started Smoking at Age 9 Michael started smoking at age 9, when his sister gave him his first cigarette. In this video, he talks about getting addicted as a child. By age 44, he had a serious lung disease. He says, "It's my desire that… you won't come to this place…."

Nathan's Ad: Secondhand Smoke AsthmaNathan's Ad: Secondhand Smoke Asthma Nathan was surrounded by secondhand smoke every day at work. This caused permanent lung damage and triggered severe asthma attacks. Nathan himself never smoked. In this TV commercial from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Nathan tells viewers that because of his health problems, he could no longer work at the same job or participate in some of his favorite activities. Nathan died at age 54 of illnesses caused by secondhand smoke exposure.

Nathan: I never smoked a day in my life!Nathan: "I never smoked a day in my life!" Nathan was Lakota, a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe, and never smoked. However, he worked in a facility where smoking was allowed, and experienced health problems as a result. In this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Nathan describes his health problems—including asthma—triggered by exposure to secondhand smoke. He had to give up many activities he loved, including tribal dancing, because of damage to his lungs. That damage led to his early death at age 54.

Roosevelt's AdRoosevelt's Ad Roosevelt never thought that at 45-years-old he would have a heart attack due to his smoking. In this TV ad, from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, he talks about the impact his smoking-related heart attack has had on his life.

Roosevelt's StoryRoosevelt's Story Roosevelt, who had a heart attack and six artery bypasses as a result of smoking, tells how his health problems prevent him from being active with his children in this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Roosevelt: It's Hard to QuitRoosevelt: "It's Hard to Quit" Even when the effects of smoking stare you in the face, it can be hard to stop smoking. Roosevelt talks about how difficult it was for him to quit smoking cigarettes even after having heart bypass surgery. This video is part of CDC's campaign, Tips From Former Smokers.

Roosevelt: Stop Believing That LieRoosevelt: "Stop Believing That Lie" Roosevelt talks about how hard it is to quit smoking, and that people often lie to themselves about the effects of smoking cigarettes. He emphasizes that it's important to try to stop smoking, both for yourself and for your loved ones. This video is part of CDC's campaign, Tips From Former Smokers.

Roosevelt: Younger Smokers Think They Aren't AddictedRoosevelt: "Younger Smokers Think They Aren't Addicted" Roosevelt tried to stop smoking cigarettes many times before he succeeded. He talks about smokers who try to fool themselves about their addiction, even though most of them want to quit smoking. This video is part of CDC's campaign, Tips From Former Smokers.

Shane's StoryShane's Story Shane, whose throat cancer was a result of smoking, discusses how he didn't realize the health complications that could result from tobacco use in this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Sharon's StorySharon's Story Sharon was diagnosed with throat cancer in her thirties. She talks about how she never thought smoking would lead to problems at such a young age in this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Shawn's StoryShawn's Story Shawn, diagnosed with throat cancer in his mid-forties, discusses how he never thought he'd get sick as a result of smoking in this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Shawn's Struggle to Quit SmokingShawn's Struggle to Quit Smoking In this video, Shawn talks about his addiction to cigarettes and his struggle to quit smoking, even after throat cancer. It wasn't until his voice box was removed that he quit. He finally realized "You either quit smoking or you're going to die." This video is part of CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Suzy's AdSuzy's Ad Smoking contributes to one in five strokes in the United States. In this TV ad for CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Suzy talks about losing her independence after smoking caused her to have a stroke.

Un consejo de SuzySuzy in English with Spanish subtitles: Un consejo de Suzy (en Inglés con subtítulos en Español) El tabaquismo es un factor que contribuye a uno de cada cinco accidentes cerebrovasculares en los EE. UU. En este anuncio televisivo de la campaña de los CDC Consejos de exfumadores, Suzy cuenta que perdió su independencia después de sufrir un accidente cerebrovascular a causa del cigarrillo.

Terrie's AdTerrie's Ad Smoking causes cancer. In this TV ad for CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Terrie talks about how she gets ready for the day after the effects of treatments for throat cancer caused her to lose her teeth and hair, and to have a laryngecotomy.

Terrie's Ad: Consequences of SmokingTerrie's Ad: Consequences of Smoking Terrie had cancer as a result of smoking. In a 2012 Tips From Former Smokers TV commercial, Terrie showed us how she got ready for her day. In this video, Terrie shares that the only voice her grandson ever heard was an artificial one. He was born after doctors removed her larynx. Her tip to smokers is to "make a video or recording of yourself reading a children's storybook and singing a lullaby—before smoking affects your health."

Terrie's Ad: Teen HeartacheTerrie's Ad: Teenage Regrets Terrie started smoking in high school to look cool. Soon, cigarettes became her constant companion. Then at age 40, Terrie got cancer from smoking and started years of medical treatments. Shortly before her death, she talked about the heartache of seeing teenagers smoking.

Terrie's Place in HistoryTerrie's Place in History When Terrie was a child, doctors first linked smoking with cancer. As a teen, Terrie started smoking. As she grew older, smoking was linked to more and more diseases. At age 40, Terrie got cancer. In this TV ad, photos of Terrie put a human face on the millions killed by smoking.

Terrie's StoryTerrie's Story Terrie, diagnosed with throat and oral cancer, describes how her addiction to tobacco and cigarettes had her smoking right up to the front door of the hospital the day of her surgery, and what finally made her quit. This video is part of CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign.

Terrie: Terrie, What Are You Doing?Terrie: "Terrie, What Are You Doing?" Terrie smoked her first cigarette at 13. In 2000, she found a sore in her mouth that was diagnosed as oral cancer. Later she found out she had throat cancer. In this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Terrie talks about getting home from the hospital after having surgery and her first realization that she had to quit smoking. She picked up a cigarette, put it in her mouth, and "for the first time, I looked at myself in the mirror, and I thought, 'Terrie, what are you doing?'"

Tiffany's Ad: Smoking and FamilyTiffany's Ad: Smoking and Family When Tiffany was 16, her mother—a cigarette smoker—died of lung cancer. Despite her loss, Tiffany started smoking 3 years later. In this TV commercial from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Tiffany says she quit smoking at 34 because she could not bear the thought of missing out on any part of her own daughter's life.

Tiffany: How I Quit SmokingTiffany: How I Quit Smoking Tiffany had an emotional reason to quit smoking: as a teen, she lost her mother to lung cancer. She knew that restroom breaks and car trips would tempt her, so she carefully planned to quit by using nicotine patches, walking, and friends' support. In this video, Tiffany talks about how she quit smoking for good.

Tiffany: You Don't Quit Just for YourselfTiffany: You Don't Quit Just for Yourself Tiffany talks about losing her mother, a smoker, to lung cancer when she was 16. Despite this, Tiffany smoked for years before realizing what she might miss in her own daughter's life. In this video from CDC's Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Tiffany's daughter's, Jaelin, says she cannot imagine living without her mother. Jaelin goes on to tell her mom how proud she is of her for quitting smoking for good.

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Images and Photos

Print-ready and web-quality Images and photos featuring Tips participants.


Tips 2013 Photos


Bill

Photo of Bill
[JPEG, 400x267 - 47KB]

Bill, 40, Michigan; diagnosed with diabetes; has other health problems, too

Ellie

Photo of Ellie
[JPEG, 400x267 - 38KB]

Ellie, 57, Florida; had asthma attack triggered by secondhand smoke at 35


Jamason

Photo of Jamason
[JPEG, 267x400 - 34KB]

Jamason, 18, Kentucky; had asthma attack triggered by secondhand smoke at 16

Mariano

Photo of Mariano
[JPEG, 400x267 - 47KB]

Mariano, 55, Illinois; had open heart surgery at age 47


Michael

Photo of Michael
[JPEG, 400x267 - 36KB]

Michael, 57, Alaska; diagnosed with COPD at age 44

Nathan

Photo of Nathan
[JPEG, 400x267 - 40KB]

Nathan, 54, Idaho; has severe lung damage from secondhand smoke exposure


Terrie

Photo of Terrie
[JPEG, 400x267 - 37KB]

Terrie, 52, North Carolina; diagnosed with oral and throat cancers at 40

Tiffany

Photo of Tiffany
[JPEG, 400x267 - 47KB]

Tiffany, 35, Louisiana; quit smoking at 34; smoke-free since January 2012


Tips 2012 Photos


AnnettePhoto of Annette [JPEG, 200x286 - 73KB], 57, New York; diagnosed with lung cancer at age 52

BrandonPhoto of Brandon [JPEG, 200x292 - 71KB], 31, North Dakota; diagnosed with Buerger’s disease at age 18


ShawnPhoto of Shawn [JPEG, 154x251 - 55KB], 51, Washington State; diagnosed with throat cancer at age 46

ShawnPhoto of Shawn [JPEG, 586x198 - 101KB], 51, Washington State; diagnosed with throat cancer at age 46

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Social Media Content

Optimized images featuring Tips From Former Smokers participants for sharing via social media platforms such as Pinterest or Facebook.


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Podcasts

Podcasts featuring Tips radio commercials and campaign-related information.


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Print Ads

Print ads featured in the Tips From Former Smokers campaign.


English Ads


Spanish Ads


Ads in Other Languages
Asian Ads

The text for these ads in various Asian languages reads: "You Can Escape From Smoking. Are you ready to quit smoking? We have effective tips for you. Call the Asian Smokers' Quitline now and receive free services that are proven to substantially increase a smoker's chances of successfully quitting, including one-on-one advice over the phone. Please call us today – you can do it!" Each ad provides the phone number for the Quitline with support for that language.

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Matte Articles

Pre-written matte articles ready for adaptation and use by journalists, bloggers, or other members of the media about the Tips from Former Smokers campaign.

Tips Campaign Matte Article: for the General Public. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Continues Tips From Former Smokers.

Tips Campaign Matte Article: for African Americans. CDC Continues Tips From Former Smokers Campaign.

Tips Campaign Matte Article: for American Indian/Alaska Natives. CDC Continues Tips From Former Smokers Campaign.

Tips Campaign Matte Article: for Asian Americans. CDC Continues Tips From Former Smokers Campaign.

Tips Campaign Matte Article: for Hispanics/Latinos. CDC Continues Tips From Former Smokers Campaign in Spanish.

Tips Campaign Matte Article: for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT). CDC Continues Tips From Former Smokers Campaign in Spanish.

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Data and Statistics

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Download Center

Campaign materials are available free, for a limited time, at CDC's Tips From Former Smokers Download Center. The materials can be used free of charge for educational or information purposes or as part of community or organization programs to decrease tobacco use and encourage quitting.

Items available from the Download Center include:

  • Low-resolution TV, print, radio, online, and out-of-home ads for use by educators, health care providers, and community organizations
  • Continuous-loop videos for doctors' offices, clinics, health departments, etc.
  • Public service announcements about quitting smoking and the effects of secondhand smoke (available in English and Spanish)

For information about broadcast-quality ads, use of PSAs for media, use of materials in textbooks, and use of materials as part of a media buy or placement, please contact CDC's Media Campaign Resource Center.

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Get Involved

Visit these sites if you'd like to learn more about tobacco prevention efforts or to become involved in your state or community's tobacco prevention efforts.

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Additional Resources

Agencies and organizations available to provide additional information and resources about tobacco use.

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