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Vaccine-Preventable Disease Tile Infographics

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Vaccine-Preventable Disease Tile Infographics (Text Version)

Chickenpox

Graphic of a child with spots on his body.
Chickenpox can be serious in healthy babies, adults, and people with weakened immune systems.
About 9 out of 10 children who get 2 doses the vaccine will be completely protected from chickenpox.
CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against chickenpox, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Diphtheria

Graphic of a silhouetted profile of a child with targets on his nose and throat.
Diphtheria is a serious disease that causes a tick coating to form on the back of the nose or throat.
This make it hard to breathe or swallow.
Diphtheria can be deadly, especially for children younger than 5 years old.
CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against diphtheria, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Hepatitis A

Graphic of an apple and a drink with germs on each.
Hepatitis A is a very contagious liver disease.
It spreads through contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by the feces (poop) of an infected person.
Children under 6 years old often have no symptoms, but they can pass the disease to older children and adults.
CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against hepatitis A, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Hepatitis B

Graphic of 10 babies crawling with one colored darker than the others.
Hepatitis B can cause liver damage and cancer.
Mothers can unknowingly pass the disease to their babies at birth.
9 out of 10 infants who get hepatitis B from their mothers develop long-term infections.
CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against hepatitis B, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Hib Disease

Graphic of a silhouetted profile of a child showing highlighting the brain with dots near the top of the skull.
Hib most often sickens babies and children under 5 years old.
Hib is a seirous disease caused by bsacteria that can lead to meningitis, pneumonia, and severe throat infections.
It can cause lifelong disability.
CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against Hib disease, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Influenza (Flu)

Graphic of a hospital.
Flu is a respiratory disease that infects the nasal passages, throat, and lungs.
It is more serious than a cold.
Flu causes 20,000 children younger than 5 to be hospitalized in the United States each year.
CDC/HHS logo.

Pregnant women and children 6 months and older should receive a flu shot.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Pneumococcal Disease

Graphic of a silhouetted profile of a child with highlights on the ears and torso.
Pneumococcal disease is caused by bacteria that can result in serious sinus infections, meningitis, pneumonia, and blood infections.
These bacteria cause up to half of middle ear infections.
Children under 2 years old are among those most at risk for pneumococcal disease.
CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against pneumococcal disease, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Polio

Graphic of a pair of crutches and a background of germs.
Polio is a crippling virus that can invade the brain and spinal cord, paralyzing or even killing children.
Polio still exists in the world.
It most often sickens children younger than 5 years old.
Image of CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against polio, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Rotavirus

Graphic of rotavirus germs.
Rotavirus is a very contagious disease that most often sickens infants and young children.
Rotavirus causes severe diarrhea and vomiting.
It can lead to dehydration, hospitalization, and even death.
CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against rotavirus, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Rubella

Silhouette graphic of a pregnant woman.
Rubella is a dangerous disease that can cause miscarriages and birth defects.
It is rare in the United States but can be brought to the U.S. by travelers.
If you are planning to get pregnant, make sure you are up-to-date on your MMR vaccines.
Image of CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against rubella.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

Tetanus

Graphic if a hand with a cut on the palm.
Tetanus (lockjaw) is a serious disease that can cause breathing problems, muscle spasms, and paralysis.
Unlike other vaccine preventable diseases, tetanus does not spread from person to person.
It enters the body through cuts of puncture wounds.
Image of CDC/HHS logo.

Protect your children by getting them vaccinated against tetanus, by 2 years old.

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents

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