National Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever Surveillance

CDC has conducted surveillance for typhoid fever since 1975. State and local health officials use a standard report form to report detailed epidemiologic information on laboratory-confirmed cases, including patient demographic and clinical information, typhoid vaccination status, and travel history. A case of typhoid fever is defined as an acute illness compatible with typhoid fever in which Salmonella serotype Typhi was isolated from a normally sterile site or from stool or urine. Travel-associated typhoid fever is defined as illness in a person who traveled outside of the United States in the 30 days before illness began, and domestically acquired typhoid fever is defined as illness in a person without such a travel history.

CDC has conducted surveillance for paratyphoid fever since 2008. Paratyphoid fever, which is caused by Salmonella serotypes Paratyphi A, tartrate-negative Paratyphi B, and Paratyphi C, is nationally notifiable, which means jurisdictions notify CDC of reported cases.

National Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever Surveillance Overview Cdc-pdf[PDF – 2 pages]

Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever Annual Summaries

Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever Surveillance Report Form Cdc-pdf[PDF – 1 page]