Stroke Communications Kit

With the support of health professionals like you, DHDSP is better able to educate the public about stroke prevention. The social media messages and graphics below can help your audiences understand the basics of stroke, including signs and symptoms, the importance of a F.A.S.T. response during a stroke, and treatment. Help DHDSP spread awareness by sharing these resources on your social media pages.

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Social Media Messages

Take action to prevent stroke. Up to 80% of strokes in the U.S. are preventable.

Raise awareness of the importance of stroke prevention all year long by adding these hashtags to your social media messages.

May 2020: National Stroke Awareness Month (#StrokeMonth)

May 17–23, 2020: National EMS Week (#EMSWeek)

October 29, 2019: World Stroke Day (#WorldStrokeDay)

Facebook/LinkedIn/Instagram

  • Time lost is brain lost. Every minute counts when you or someone you know is having a stroke. Act F.A.S.T. and call 9-1-1 right away if you spot signs of stroke. http://bit.ly/2mYG0xaexternal icon
  • Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability nationwide and around the world—but it doesn’t have to be. Learn how you can treat and prevent stroke with tools from CDC [tag]. http://bit.ly/2oJOwleexternal icon
  • Do you know the signs and symptoms of stroke? F.A.S.T. is an easy acronym to help you remember them—and perhaps save a life. https://bit.ly/2nwcsZUexternal icon
  • From the first symptoms of stroke to recovery at home, here’s how the CDC [tag] Coverdell Program connects health care professionals across the system of care to save lives and improve care. http://bit.ly/2ovTdlhexternal icon
  • A stroke can happen at any age, at any time—just ask these 10 survivors. Read their stories about how stroke changed their lives. http://bit.ly/2HVJJejexternal icon
  • Did you know that some stroke symptoms in women may be different from those in men? Here are 5 risk factors women should know to protect their brain health. https://bit.ly/2Yl30JMexternal icon
  • Not all women are equally affected by stroke; African American women are more likely to have a stroke than any other group of women in the U.S. Try these 4 lifestyle changes to lower your risk. https://bit.ly/2Yl30JMexternal icon
  • About 1 in 4 Hispanic women have high blood pressure, a major stroke risk factor. Learn how the ABCS of heart health can help lower your risk. https://bit.ly/2Yl30JMexternal icon
  • After decades of declining rates of stroke deaths, progress in preventing stroke deaths in the U.S. has slowed. The good news? YOU have the power to make a difference. Explore stroke data and prevention strategies for health systems, health professionals, and state health departments. http://bit.ly/2vUKTA4external icon
Ensuring high-quality stroke care for 15 years.

Join us in celebrating 15 years of stroke care through the Coverdell Program! Learn more about the program’s history, currently funded states, and partnership opportunities.

Twitter

  • Recognizing the signs and symptoms of a #stroke F.A.S.T. can help save lives. Here’s how. http://bit.ly/208s3wkexternal icon
  • Every 3 minutes and 35 seconds, someone dies of #stroke. Learn how you can prevent a stroke or lower your risk of having one with tips from @CDCHeart_Stroke. http://bit.ly/2hSXBY9external icon
  • Learn how the @CDCHeart_Stroke Coverdell Program works to improve access and care for #stroke patients nationwide. http://bit.ly/2ovTdlhexternal icon
  • A #stroke can happen at any age, at any time—just ask these 10 stroke survivors. Read their stories on @CDCHeart_Stroke. http://bit.ly/2HVJJejexternal icon
  • DYK #women have unique #stroke risk factors from men? Here are 5 risk factors women should know to protect their brain health. https://bit.ly/2Yl30JMexternal icon
  • Not all #women are equally affected by #stroke; #AfricanAmerican women are more likely to have a stroke than any other group of women in the U.S. Try these 4 lifestyle changes to lower your risk. https://bit.ly/2Yl30JMexternal icon
  • About 1 out of 4 #Hispanic women have high #BloodPressure, a major #stroke risk factor. Learn how the ABCS of heart health can help lower your risk. https://bit.ly/2Yl30JMexternal icon
  • Up to 80% of strokes are preventable. Reduce #stroke deaths in your community with prevention and treatment strategies from @CDCHeart_Stroke. http://bit.ly/2vUKTA4external icon

Shareable Graphics

Download these stroke graphics to share on your social media pages.

Touching the lives of over 1 million stroke patients.

Supporting stroke systems of care.

Ensuring high-quality stroke care for 15 years.

Understand your risk for stroke. Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke.

Learn the signs. Face. Arms. Speech. Time to call 9-1-1.

A stroke can strike at any age. Make healthy lifestyle choices to lower your risk.

Take action to prevent stroke. Up to 80% of strokes in the U.S. are preventable.

Stroke care is a team effort. Lean how CDC helps improve care and save lives.

Time lost is brain lost. Every minute counts during a stroke. Call 9-1-1 right away.

Women and Stroke: women have unique risk factors for stroke. Learn the risks, know the signs.  cdc.gov

Women and stroke: A woman can have a stroke at any age. Learn the signs, know the risks.  cdc.gov

Women and Stroke: Each year, stroke kills twice as many women as breast cancer. Learn the risks, know the signs. CDC

Women and Stroke: 1 in 3 women with high blood pressure--the biggest stroke risk factor--doesn't know she has it. Learn the risks, know the signs. CDC

Women and Stroke: 1 in 5 women will have a stroke. Learn the risks, know the signs. CDC

Videos

Recognize the Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

 

Published October 26, 2015

When someone is having a stroke, every minute counts. Just as putting out a fire quickly can stop it from spreading, treating a stroke quickly can reduce damage to the brain. If you learn how to recognize the telltale signs of a stroke, you can act quickly and save a life—maybe even your own.

Coverdell Stroke Program: Ensuring That All Americans Receive the Highest-Quality Care

 

Published October 27, 2015

The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program, implemented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tracks and measures acute stroke care in order to improve the quality of care, from first contact with emergency medical services to the hospital and after the patient returns home from the hospital. The program works to improve stroke care nationwide and reduce stroke complications and deaths, particularly among those with the highest burden.

Dr. Michael Frankel’s Story: Understanding the Components of Better Care for Stroke Patients

 

Published April 26, 2016

As the lead neurologist for the Coverdell Stroke Program in Georgia, Dr. Michael Frankel engages hospitals to participate in Georgia’s stroke registry. Participating hospitals better connect the continuum of care so that physicians have more information to make the right decisions every time. The data show that stroke death rates are lower in the communities served by hospitals that embrace practices supported by Coverdell.

Dr. Frankel’s Coverdell Story: Improving Stroke Care in Georgia

 

Published October 27, 2015

As the lead neurologist for the Coverdell Stroke Program in Georgia, Dr. Michael Frankel engages hospitals to participate in Georgia’s stroke registry. Participating hospitals better connect the continuum of care so that physicians have more information to make the right decisions every time. The data show that stroke death rates are lower in the communities served by hospitals that embrace practices supported by Coverdell.

Prince Quire’s Stroke Story

 

Published October 27, 2015

Every 40 seconds, someone in the U.S. has a stroke. One of those people was Prince Quire, who is African American. At only 39 years old, he was younger than the typical stroke patient, but EMTs know that a stroke can happen at any age. Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death for all Americans, including African Americans, but African Americans are twice as likely to have a stroke as whites are.

Tips From Former Smokers: Blanche’s Story

Published April 17, 2015

Blanche is a CDC employee who smoked cigarettes for more than 25 years and quit after suffering a stroke.

Visit CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers web site for more information.

Quiz

Additional Resources

For Health Professionals

For Consumers

  • Know the Facts About Stroke
    Learn the risks, signs and symptoms, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of stroke.
  • Stroke and You Fact Sheet Series
    Share these resources with your audiences to help them make healthy lifestyle changes and control health conditions that raise their risk for stroke.
  • Stroke Survivor Stories
    Read these survivor stories to learn how you may be at risk for stroke and what to do if stroke happens.
  • Three Steps to Stroke Recovery
    This CDC Features article talks about what to expect if you are recovering from stroke and how to prevent another stroke from happening.
  • Pregnancy and Stroke: Are You at Risk?
    This CDC Features article discusses the connection between pregnancy and stroke and what you can do to keep yourself and your baby healthy.