Occupational Dermatoses

Slides 136 to 139

Slide 136 – Dental Assistant (allergy to glutaraldehyde and neomycin)

SLIDE 136 - Dental Assistant (allergy to glutaraldehyde and neomycin)

Workers frequently develop a secondary contact allergy to topical products such as antibiotics that they use to treat their work-related dermatitis. This dental assistant with hand dermatitis was allergic to glutaraldehyde that she used to sterilize instruments, and to neomycin.

Slide 137 – Optician – non-dominant hand dermatitis (allergy to ethyl acrylate)

SLIDE 137 - Optician - non-dominant hand dermatitis (allergy to ethyl acrylate)

Dermatitis primarily on the non-dominant hand develops in workers who grip an object while performing a more delicate task, often with a tool, with the dominant hand. This right-handed optician recalled only after patch-testing positive to ethyl acrylate that he sometimes held heated acrylic frames in his left hand, which caused his dermatitis.
 

Slide 138 – Hair stylist (allergy to hair dye and permanent wave solution)

SLIDE 138 - Hair stylist (allergy to hair dye and permanent wave solution)

Slide 139 – Hair stylist (patch test sites)

SLIDE 139 - Hair stylist (allergy to hair dye and permanent wave solution)

This hair stylist with hand dermatitis was allergic to para-phenylenediamine (hair dye) and glyceryl monothioglycolate (permanent wave solution). The latter penetrates both vinyl and rubber gloves and allergy may be a cause of permanent disability.

Page last reviewed: January 5, 1998 (archived document)