Mining Publication: Using CPDM Dust Data

Original creation date: February 2016

Authors: EJ Haas, D Willmer, JJ Meadows

Non-Peer Reviewed Journal Article - February 2016

NIOSHTIC2 Number: 20047706

Coal Age 2016 Feb; 121(2):40-41

A major part of the newly updated dust regulation requires mine operators to begin collecting respirable dust samples using continuous personal dust monitors (CPDMs) for designated occupations (DO) and "other" designated occupations (ODO) beginning February 1, 2016. With the regulation now in place, mine operators, mine-workers and stakeholders are each responsible for various tasks to ensure an appropriate amount of CPDM 3700 samples are completed per quarter. With the CPDM providing miners with near-real-time feedback about their level of respirable coal dust exposure on the job, a new opportunity is arising for management who—in collaboration with their employees—can use this information to determine methods for reduced exposure. Some researchers have effectively argued that the use of information technology can enhance organizational communication around health and safety. In line with that argument, taking a nonjudgmental yet proactive approach to discuss the dust data produced by the CPDM may help to identify and support actions to limit future exposure during reoccurring work tasks.

In light of the new regulation, it is highly important for mine operators and miners to not only understand how they can use the technology to monitor personal exposure to respirable dust, but exactly what and how they can engage in actions to reduce exposure. Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently met with several coal miners who were learning how to use the technology during their shifts. During the discussions with these miners, they learned key points about how the CPDM can be introduced and used to encourage positive health communication efforts among miners.

Cover image for Using CPDM Dust Data
Non-Peer Reviewed Journal Article - February 2016

NIOSHTIC2 Number: 20047706

Coal Age 2016 Feb; 121(2):40-41


Page last reviewed: 12/3/2019 Page last updated: 12/3/2019