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Sleep Awareness Week, April 23–29, 2017

Sleep Awareness Week, the National Sleep Foundation’s annual campaign to educate the public about the importance of sleep in health and safety, will be observed April 23–29, 2017. The amount of sleep a person needs changes with age. Adults need ≥7 hours each night to promote optimal health and well-being (1); children and adolescents require even more sleep. Sleep needs decrease from 12–16 hours of sleep per 24 hours (including naps) for infants aged 4–12 months to 8–10 hours of sleep for teenagers aged 13–18 years (2). Children who regularly sleep less than the recommended amount are more likely to have behavior and learning problems, physical and mental health conditions such as obesity, diabetes, depression, or injuries (2). A regular bedtime routine can help children get adequate sleep. The American Academy of Pediatrics provides advice for parents at https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/sleep/. Additional details about how much sleep is recommended across a lifespan is available at https://www.cdc.gov/sleep/about_sleep/how_much_sleep.html.


References

  1. Watson NF, Badr MS, Belenky G, et al. ; Consensus Conference Panel. Joint consensus statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society on the recommended amount of sleep for a healthy adult: methodology and discussion. Sleep 2015;38:1161–83. PubMed
  2. Paruthi S, Brooks LJ, D’Ambrosio C, et al. Recommended amount of sleep for pediatric populations: a consensus statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12:785–6. CrossRef PubMed

Suggested citation for this article: Announcement. Sleep Awareness Week, April 23–29, 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;66:411. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6615a6.

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