Infographics

Adolescent Connectedness

YRBS Data Summary and Trends

High-Risk Substance Use

HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. HIGH-RISK PROGRESS SUBSTANCE USE  PROGRESS Fewer students have ever used illicit drugs.* *cocaine, heroin, methamphetamines, inhalants, hallucinogens, or ecstasy. 2007 - 23% compared to 2017 -14%  CHALLENGES Nearly 1 in 7 students have ever misused prescription opioids. 14% in 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017

Mental Health

HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. MENTAL HEALTH PROGRESS Most students experience positive mental health. Adults can sup port students’ mental health by watching for warning signs and linking students to help.  CHALLENGES During the past year, almost 1 in 3 students persistently felt sad or hopeless. 29% in 2007 compared to 32% in 2017  Students who made a suicide plan: 11% in 2007, 14% in 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017

Sexual Behaviors

HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. SEXUAL BEHAVIORS  PROGRESS Fewer students are having sex.   48% in 2007 compared to 40% in 2017   Fewer students have had 4 or more sex partners. 15% in 2007 compared to 10% in 2017  CHALLENGES Fewer students who have sex are using condoms. 62% in 2007 compared to 54% in 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017

Violence Victimization

HEALTH OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY RESULTS Although progress has been made, there are still too many students reporting risky sexual behaviors, high-risk substance use, violence victimization, and poor mental health, including suicide risk. VIOLENCE VICTIMIZATION  PROGRESS Fewer male students are bullied at school. 19% in 2007, 16% in 2017  Fewer students experience sexual dating violence.  10% in 2013, 7% in 2017  CHALLENGES About 1 in 5 students are still bullied at school. 20% in 2007, 19% in 2017  More than 1 in 10 female students have ever been forced to have sex. 11% in 2007 and 2017  WHY IS THIS INFORMATION IMPORTANT? These health risk behaviors and experiences can lead to HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, and pregnancy. WHAT CAN BE DONE? SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, AND COMMUNITIES CAN WORK TOGETHER TO POSITIVELY AFFECT STUDENTS’ HEALTH. RESOURCES Learn more about student health behaviors on CDC’s Healthy Youth website (www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth).  Source: CDC, YRBS Data Summary & Trends Report: 2007-2017

HIV and Risk Behaviors in Youth

Strategies and Protective Factors

Schools and Health